Anyone with a vagina - cervical screening campaign

SpokeyDokey

Into my 64th
Moderator
Moot point is that if a campaign with high impact gets more people who have a cervix into the screening program and saves some lives, then it's job done imo.

In a way it is sad that Vagina is considered a shock word in this day and age.

The take up rate is appallingly low for smear tests especially amongst young people, who are at highest risk, and we need to do all we can to get at risk people to get over there hang-ups (genital appearance & smell when I read a NHS report some while back) and tbh even if the use of the C word, with much more shock value, in advertising is what it takes to achieve this than so be it. I'd rather there be a hundred 'Offended of Tunbridge Wells' in a fret than one dead person whose life could've been saved.

The debate over terminology use is a non-starter for me - the real debate is why people do not take up all the NHS screening opportunities available to them and what should be done to increase uptake rates.
 

winjim

Iron pony
If I have got the terminology correct, then a trans woman does not have a cervix. Are they really so ignorant of their own biology* that they insist on tests on a body part they do not have? I don't suppose the NHS wastes that much time for the receptionists telling such patients the reason why they do not need/cannot have this test.

* this ignorance seems very unlikely to me given what they would have had to go through to become a trans woman.
I don't know but I could imagine that some people would see the test as part of the experience of being a woman so might wish to have it done, or a version of it, as part of that.
 

Pat "5mph"

A kilogrammicaly challenged woman
Moderator
Location
Glasgow
You, me & Alicat = 3
Still a small sample but 100% of the women in this thread (I think!)
And me, I'm not put off by the lingo either.
I'm put off by the actual test!
Still go, though: I figure that if the NHS makes the effort to organize a nation wide screen at no cost to us, we should attend.
As a non UK national, I know well that women on the continent have to pay for most gynecological checks.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
And me, I'm not put off by the lingo either.
I'm put off by the actual test!
Still go, though: I figure that if the NHS makes the effort to organize a nation wide screen at no cost to us, we should attend.
As a non UK national, I know well that women on the continent have to pay for most gynecological checks.
Make that 5 women. The test isn’t especially pleasant but better than the potential alternative of having undetected late stage cervical cancer
 
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