Are the EU being Shellfish?

I'm glad we're not associated with them
You're right of course.

Except for sending them almost half of what we export, importing almost half of our food from them, sharing a history and enlightenment values, overcoming Nazism and Stalinism together, having millions of our citizens living there and vice versa, we have no association which the dastardly Eurowhatsits at all.

Oh, and a shared passion for controlling our borders, though you object to that on their part at least, it appears.
 

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
I'm sure the people there want to but your fish too, if they were only allowed.
They are allowed, but the EU is setting the rules about what foods are allowed over their borders, how unbelievably fascist of those communist Brussels bureaucrats.
 

snorri

Legendary Member
I'm not questioning the EU's ability to set its own rules. I'm questioning the motivation behind those rules.
The rules were set when the UK was a member of the EU, no doubt to protect the health of consumers among other things.
I doubt if the UK would welcome EU inspectors in to inspect the efficiency of UK shellfish cleaning plants now, so can we be surprised that the EU is unwilling to accept our shellfish?
 

JBGooner

Über Member
Unfinished you say? But we Got Brexit Done!
2026 is when the UK can get full control of its seas again.

Of course the nice neighbours have threatened to stop selling the UK electricity if the UK doesn't let them continue to take its fish for free! :laugh:

Great bunch they are.
 

JBGooner

Über Member
They are allowed, but the EU is setting the rules about what foods are allowed over their borders, how unbelievably fascist of those communist Brussels bureaucrats.
Treaty of Rome:
"DESIRING to contribute, by means of a common commercial policy, to the progressive
abolition of restrictions on international trade,"

Not really sticking to the spirit of their own foundation document are they?
 

Eric Olthwaite

Insert witty self-deprecating description here
The rules were set when the UK was a member of the EU, no doubt to protect the health of consumers among other things.
I doubt if the UK would welcome EU inspectors in to inspect the efficiency of UK shellfish cleaning plants now, so can we be surprised that the EU is unwilling to accept our shellfish?
The EU rule has nothing to do with UK shellfish cleaning plants. It prevents British vessels from selling live shellfish to the EU for cleaning in EU plants, but not EU vessels that have fished in exactly the same waters.

There is no public health rationale, it is protectionism pure and simple. Which the EU is perfectly entitled to engage in. And I am perfectly entitled to criticise. For me at least it is not an unexpected consequence, the EU is an unpleasant protectionist construct, and that's why I wanted out.
 

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
2026 is when the UK can get full control of its seas again.

Of course the nice neighbours have threatened to stop selling the UK electricity if the UK doesn't let them continue to take its fish for free! :laugh:

Great bunch they are.
No they didn't threaten that. The UK government gave them that leverage as part of the deal struck. It's simply that the fishing rights deal expires at the same time as the deal regarding frictionless access to the EU energy market.

Stop being bitter that brexit isn't wonderful like you thought. We've been telling you it's going to be a shitshow for years.
 

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
Treaty of Rome:
"DESIRING to contribute, by means of a common commercial policy, to the progressive
abolition of restrictions on international trade,"

Not really sticking to the spirit of their own foundation document are they?
But we told them to go fsck themselves and opted out of that common policy, what's your point?
 
I'm not questioning the EU's ability to set its own rules. I'm questioning the motivation behind those rules.
Why?

What does it matter?

They're free to pursue their own motivations, as are we. That was the point.

Whining that we don't like it won't help. We can either live with it, or negotiate closer alignment with the EU in exchange for more access. We made that choice. *Our* choice, as promised by Brexiteers. Choices have consequences.

FWIW, almost all countries and blocs have extremely tight regs on this sort of thing. EU are not unique.
 

JBGooner

Über Member
No they didn't threaten that. The UK government gave them that leverage as part of the deal struck. It's simply that the fishing rights deal expires at the same time as the deal regarding frictionless access to the EU energy market.
Implicit threat that if the UK doesn't continue to allow the EU to take our fish for free then the EU won't sell the UK their excess electricity.

By 2026 windpower in the UK will have doubled so the EU can keep its electricity :laugh:

But we told them to go fsck themselves and opted out of that common policy, what's your point?
:wacko: The EU's very foundation document states they want "progressive abolition of restrictions on international trade,"

Their current bunch of chumps shows that they clearly don't want that.
 
There was always going to be initial teething troubles, especially as we're still only just out, and even some aspects that will be negative, such is life, but I'm not sure what people think will change if they're raked over on a forum.

Finding some sort of pleasure from what you seem to believe is misery, seems a strange way of passing the day, but whatever floats your boat I suppose. :becool:
 
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