Bad speelers of t wurld untie

icowden

Über Member
Location
Surrey
Perhaps for traditional subjects and PGCE exams it should be strict to the letter...
Maybe, but I think Education needs to modernise and stop sticking rigidly to Victorian teaching techniques.
There is no value to closed book exams when you are going into a world that relies on immediate research using the internet.
Beautiful handwriting is useful if you are going to be a calligrapher, but for most of us we will never write more than our signature.
Both my kids now talk to their laptops when they are writing homework.

Nobody needs to memorise history any more.
 
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...hpzgrMdAanSgXsJIImShRlqsQQpFk7DiC4Dmy6ZXsYSU4



Ummm. Where to start with this one?

I get that they're talking about the Arts courses, not real degrees, but even so. Aren't Universities seats of learning any more? Is Education a bad word there?

Really exposes how universities have become businesses before anything else. They have to attract customers and can't afford to scare any away by having standards. It's all about fleecing kids, saddling them with debt and giving them worthless scraps of paper in return.
I thought academics long ago stopped docking marks for spelling. It is the ability to provide correct and coherent answers that mattered. Nothing to do with being politically correctness or addressing perceived social and cultural imbalance. Ask any academic and they will tell you dyslexia alone contributes a lot of spelling errors. And there are some brilliant people out there with atrocious spelling but nobody gives a toss.

Anyway, all assignments now days are done on PCs and spell checked. Submitted article is run thru one of those plagiarism checkers which is now a mandate.

Not sure if this is a windup.
 

MontyVeda

a short-tempered ill-controlled small-minded troll
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...hpzgrMdAanSgXsJIImShRlqsQQpFk7DiC4Dmy6ZXsYSU4



Ummm. Where to start with this one?

I get that they're talking about the Arts courses, not real degrees, but even so. Aren't Universities seats of learning any more? Is Education a bad word there?

Really exposes how universities have become businesses before anything else. They have to attract customers and can't afford to scare any away by having standards. It's all about fleecing kids, saddling them with debt and giving them worthless scraps of paper in return.
I thought this had been the case for a few decades... plenty of students are dyslexic and docking marks against them would be discriminatory. Yes we could use spell checkers, but they're not always perfect. My spell checker is downright daft half the time.

edit... @Arrowfoot beat me to it :smile:
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
This bit is clearly a trap:
"
University tutors are being told not to dock marks for spelling mistakes because requiring good English could be seen as “homogenous north European, white, male, elite”.
"

It's bait for Gammon. I'm not falling for that one!
(easy for me to say, of course, being part of the elite ... )
Since when were we "elite"? Last time I looked we were everywhere!
 

nickyboy

Norven Mankey
I'm afraid that claim lacks veracity.

Here's a few books published in the 1820s.

All are easily understandable today, which is partly why they are still read today, and they are certainly not 'completely different' from today's English.

The language does evolve - I find Shakespeare hard work - but it's a very slow process and any noticeable change takes many lifetimes.

Thus we are all stuck with the accepted English of the time in which we live.

  • The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (Paperback) ...
  • The Last of the Mohicans (The Leatherstocking Tales #2) ...
  • Confessions of an English Opium Eater (Paperback) ...
  • Melmoth the Wanderer (Paperback) ...
  • The Last Man (Paperback) ...
  • The Night Before Christmas (Hardcover) ...
  • The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner (Paperback)
Verily, I say unto thee, thou'st mistaken
 

icowden

Über Member
Location
Surrey
I'd dispute that, unless you are just referring to dates.
So you just look stuff up in a flash and get
THE HISTORY?
Whose history? Whose interpretation?
Which facts even?
From which faction?
That's the point. You need to learn to look at multiple sources, to learn how to examine the provenance of those sources. It's all very well learning that Henry VIII had 6 wives, one of whom lost her head, but unless you are planning to be a historian it's unlikely to be of huge value to memorise it for a test. Better to set a question that asks the student to find out why Henry had 6 wives and what that meant for the political climate at the time, including references to source data. Get them searching and learning. Not memorising solely so they can vomit it out onto an exam paper on demand to score points.
 

newts

Senior Member
Location
Exeter
The pheasants are revolting
 

dutchguylivingintheuk

Senior Member
I see laziness cropping up in our language. Texting is primarily responsible for it with things like, 'Meet U B4 lunch' etc , which is just people not being arsed to spend a few more seconds (literally) typing out 'Meet you before lunch'. Language should not have anything to do with 'white elite'. It has standards like science.
yeah i really don't understand that i mean i have a Samsung phone i know there are people with other brand too but let's not brand shame, but if a write b it already has a lot of suggestions,, usually none of which i really wanted to write if that meet in this example would go ahead but the point is, je don't need to write in numbers to type fast.. that number writing thing always looks the me like you mist your calling and wanted to be a code writer or something. but that just me off course...

But if i would be a black hard working person with an university degree i would find it very offensive that my hard work is downgraded as a white-ist elite thing instead of a accomplishment, reached by working hard, being smart and those kind of things..
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
You can take the lass out of Yorkshire...
Which rather obscures the point that the English language hasn't evolved a great deal in 200 years.

Yes it does evolve, but even more slowly in the case of spelling and usage mistakes which obscure meaning.

Unless anyone thinks the current distinction between the likes of their, there, and they're is about to end anytime soon.

The odd spelling mistake is neither here nor there, but the usage mistakes are irritating because they trip up and confuse the reader.
 
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