Bike advice for limited mobility rider please

crisscross

Senior Member
My father needs a bike.

He is in his 70's and not at all fit.

He is over weight and has not been able to excercise for some time.

He really enjoyed the velib bikes in paris and I just wondered if anyone sells anything similar.

They are easy to get on and off - with a very low crossbar, hard wearing and don't have many bells and whistles.

Does this kind of bike have a real name? And any recommendations please.

Thanks

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summerdays

Cycling in the sun
Location
Bristol
What about the Kona Africa Bike? Though I don't know how it compares to the above.
 

palinurus

Velo, boulot, dodo
Location
Watford
So something with a step-through frame, hub gears, perhaps built in lighting?

Velib' bikes are great- they are heavy though, you should be able to find something lighter with some similar features. Here is an example

Other manufacturers offer similar types of bike, often marketed for women,

Like this one from Dawes

I've just looked at the Kona that Summerdays mentioned- nicer price than the two examples I've given.

These are some examples, you'll probably want to choose based on what is available in shops in your area so your father can test ride them.
 
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crisscross

Senior Member
Thanks for the advice guys, I wasn't sure if these ladies bikes would be strong enough.

My wife has a Specialized Expedition which is a very upright looking bike.

He rode that to see if he would cope with the velibs so maybe that would be an idea.
 
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crisscross

Senior Member
Thanks peeps, but having taken advice from "the boss" she reckons that if he gets an electric bike he won't bother with the pedalling bit - which may well defeat the object!

So back to the drawing board.
 
crisscross said:
Hadn't considered an eBike, he'd probably not pedal at all with one of those, but shape and spec seem good - can't see a price though?

There are basically two types of ebike....

The first is where you have to pedal and the motor then assists with the input and effectively subsidies your efforts, however you have to keeep pedaling for it to work as there will be no subsidy when not pedalling

The second is where the motor is independent (sometimes a minumium speed cutout) where the power is controlled by a twist grip and you can power along whilst not pedaling.

Each has its pros and cons. The latter will get you home with no effort if you have overdone it, but the former ensures that you get exercise
 
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