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Bristol is named as the new Cycling City

Discussion in 'Advocacy and Cycling Safety' started by summerdays, 19 Jun 2008.

  1. summerdays

    summerdays Cycling in the sun Staff Member

    Location:
    Bristol
    Its in the news: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/bristol/7462791.stm

    its a pity that the clip they showed of someone cycling in Bristol, talking about cyclists going through red lights ... and in the background it looks like it shows cyclists going through red lights but they aren't ... its a toucan crossing point. (The best set of lights in town with a 15 second delay from pressing the button to the lights changing:biggrin:). Unfortunate timing in the film.
     
  2. zimzum42

    zimzum42 Legendary Member

    They've all sold their cars to buy smack ;)
     
  3. John the Monkey

    John the Monkey Frivolous Cyclist

    Location:
    Crewe
    "In other news, manufacturers of green paint celebrated an unexpected upturn in business..."
     
  4. OP
    OP
    summerdays

    summerdays Cycling in the sun Staff Member

    Location:
    Bristol
    Well if it takes green paint (I think its usually red in Bristol), to get folk on bikes then I'm all for it... hopefully those that initially start on the paths will gradually move to being on the road. And I'm assuming that there will be adult training on offer.

    I'm hoping that there will also be more racks around the town... some parts such as up by the University/Park Street/Cathedral just don't have any where near the number of racks needed.

    Now I wonder if they can double the number of cyclists and how they go about measuring that.
     
  5. Cab

    Cab New Member

    Location:
    Cambridge
    Encouraging cyclists onto the road by using cycle lanes is like encouraging people to eat well by giving them angel delight.

    Cyclists are not 'the problem' on our roads, the problem is volume and behaviour of motorists; you don't solve that attitude problem by ghettoising the more valid (in environmenta, economic and health terms) and reinforcing the perception that they should be kept out of the way for convenience of others.

    From what I can see, this is all about spending a little money (like, the equivalent of a few yards on new motorways) to be seen to be doing something; it isn't for cyclists, it isn't to encourage cycling, it is to be seen to be encouraging other people onto bikes because that'll make motoring more convenient.
     
  6. John the Monkey

    John the Monkey Frivolous Cyclist

    Location:
    Crewe
    An Australian blog I read recently said (paraphrased slightly) "There has to be more to cycle commuting than a series of frightened dashes between pieces of traffic free infrastructure".

    Good post Cab.
     
  7. MartinC

    MartinC Über Member

    Location:
    Cheltenham
    I've been working in Zurich for 4 months, they've got transport sorted. Cab is right the biggest problem with all UK transport issues is the volume and attitude of car drivers. Nothing will improve cycling much until that is changed. The UK is a car centric society and until space and oil run out completely it won't change. I very much doubt that people will see this coming (they've had 40 years already and he penny hasn't dropped) or be able to cope with a change. Politicians fiddling around the edges can't make a difference. Pessimistic, yes, unfortunately I think it's true.
     
  8. Fasman

    Fasman New Member

    I don't know Martin. Bristol feels like it its on the cusp of a big shift. Filling in the missing cycle links, better training, the hire scheme and all the other things proposed might just do it.

    The sum involved would buy, what, 10 metres of motorway? But if Bristol can prove you can double cycling with such a 'small' (in the grand scheme of things) sum, then maybe national policy may shift a little more in cyclists favour.
     
  9. marinyork

    marinyork Resting in suspended Animation

    Location:
    Logopolis
    £11 mil is what I heard. That's an awful lot of dosh when you compare to cycling budgets in most places or even the £50m sustrans have been given to piss spend away. On the other hand I do worry about what John the Monkey says about green and red tarmac, in my city they measure the amount put in in metres!!!!! However joking aside looking at the costings per scheme around here anyway £11m presumably does go a long way to wish lists and some of it will filter down into physical facilities rather than cosmetic ones. The doubling sounds ambitious but if they get anywhere near that then well done to them.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    summerdays

    summerdays Cycling in the sun Staff Member

    Location:
    Bristol
    I'm hoping that it won't just be bits of extra coloured tarmac along the edge of roads, but more joined up thinking, making it easier for cyclists (whether it be cycling against the flow in some one way routes, allowing short cuts through some parks that are currently no cycling). And I would love some lockers in Broadmead so I could dump my pannier and helmet when I go shopping.
     
  11. marinyork

    marinyork Resting in suspended Animation

    Location:
    Logopolis
    Well I'd have thought some of those schemes will be implemented. If you compare 11 mil to the sort of budget round here (reputedly 250-400k) it'd probably get spent on exactly the sort of schemes that are tens of thousands of pounds but on the wish list and likely to get shelved (like they are here in the 5 year plan and get delegated to later years or say they've run out of money like one scheme I enquired about).
     
  12. sheddy

    sheddy Veteran

    Location:
    Suffolk
    "The further 11 Cycling Demonstration Towns will build on the work of the existing six Cycling Demonstration Towns appointed in 2005, which have seen significant increases in cycling levels. They are Blackpool, Cambridge, Chester, Colchester, Leighton/Linslade, Shrewsbury, Southend on Sea, Southport with Ainsdale, Stoke, Woking and York" from http://nds.coi.gov.uk/environment/f...77&NewsAreaID=2&NavigatedFromDepartment=False
     
  13. simon l& and a half

    simon l& and a half New Member

    Location:
    Streatham Hill
    I know that you've read this before, but I've taken to counting the cars and the cycles on three major roads on our commute - Stockwell Road, Kennington Road and Blackfriars Bridge Road. On each cars are outnumbered by bikes - at the time of day (about 6.30) that we travel homewards.

    The result, or one of many results, is that cyclists are treated with a greater degree of respect than one would have thought likely five or ten years ago.

    Now, if any of the cycling towns can replicate this kind of success, then the diversion of monies from the motorway budget to the cycling budget can be accounted a success. And, however much we (I include myself in this) might quibble with the chosen means of increasing bicycle use, the intent is there, and it's undoubtedly the case that the DfT will want to learn the lessons from each city's experience.

    And, yes, this is not about us - it's about cyclists as yet unformed.
     
  14. marinyork

    marinyork Resting in suspended Animation

    Location:
    Logopolis
    Well said. I was merely trying to point out that the magnitude of the budgets should allow for instant action on these routes/projects rather than spread over a number of years (or even delayed). I'm more of a fan of physical infrastructure - bridges, short cuts, some junction tinkering, parking. However such a budget should allow for the lot - routes, physical infrastructure, back up, advertising, better maintenance, signage etc. At the moment it's rather stretched (well round here it is).
     
  15. Fasman

    Fasman New Member

    I think you'll be lucky if its even that high! Seems like a good plan, bring forward those things which have been programmed for years, but keep getting bumped down the list. Physical infrastructure would be my natural instinct, it's there forever and the chance to do many of larger schemes is rare, especially given the cost of anything which needs a CPO or difficult engineering (a new bridge, pontoon etc).

    But the objective of the project is to double numbers cycling and simon is right , its not about us converted i suppose, its about the yet to be converted. Bike re-cyc, training and so on will help do that. The single measure i'm most excited about having the most impact is grants for employers and landlords to install cycling facilities in work places. In my last job i had to use the loos... same for a lot of people.