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handlebar height

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by roadiewill, 3 Apr 2008.

  1. roadiewill

    roadiewill New Member

    Location:
    Wiltshire
    OK, Ive sorted the seat height out now on my bike, but Im struggling with the handlebars. Apparently my back should be horizontal when in the drops. Is this right?

    So, I took some of the spacers out of my SCR3 stem and lowered the bars. However, now I have about 2cm of the fork stem sticking out the top. I put some spacers around this bit to cover it up but they arent under any pressure and just wobble. Is there anything I can do/buy to improve this, without having the bare steerer tube petruding.

    Also, Ive forgotton in what order you retighten the bolts. Do you tighten the star nut bolt first and then the bolts on the side, or vice a versa?

    ta
     
  2. OP
    OP
    roadiewill

    roadiewill New Member

    Location:
    Wiltshire
    this is the previous handlebar height:

    [​IMG]
     
  3. RedBike

    RedBike New Member

    Location:
    Beside the road
    It's not essential to have a flat back. This is the most aerodynamic position and therefore the quickest. However, there's no point riding like this if it's uncomfortable. Most riders (unless they're pros) will sit slightly more upright. At the moment you're sat bolt upright like you would be on a MTB. When racing you will put you at a noticeable disadvantage.

    Here's another pic
    754339475_801717659e_m.jpg
    Note, the backs almost flat but he's not on the drops.

    You want enough spacers so that they extend about 5mm above the top of the steerer tube. You then put the top-cap on first and tighten it (to pre-load the bearings). Then you tighten the bolts on the stem. The spacers definately shouldn't rattle.

    Don't worry about the spacers ontop. You can eventually cut the forks steerer to size;
    ** But don't start hacking bits off the steerer until you're sure you want your bars that low!! **

    - GF3 -
     
  4. Joe24

    Joe24 More serious cyclist than Bonj

    Location:
    Nottingham
    On my SCR4 the handlebars started off up high, but has slowly dropped down.
    I only have the smallest spacer at the bottom of the stem at the moment, which gives me a pretty flat riding position. But i am stretched out, but i like this.
    Here is how my bike is.
    th_Image022_1.jpg
    Still need to cut the steerer down, but not got round to it yet.
    I took out the big spacer and had the stem pointing down at the start, then when i got used to it, i took the next biggest spacer out. If this is uncomfortable, then changes the 2nd spacer you took out to the smallest spacer.
     
  5. RedBike

    RedBike New Member

    Location:
    Beside the road
    Forgot to add. If you put the bars to low you will naturally try to sit more upright by straightening your arms. Straight arms are bad news, all the road vibration / bumps will be transmitted straight to your wrists, neck, back.

    -gf3
     
  6. punkypossum

    punkypossum Donut Devil

    As long as you stick all the spacers you have taken out back on top, it should work perfectly fine...don't understand how they can be wobbly, but then I'm definitely not a techie myself... ;)
     
  7. Jacomus-rides-Gen

    Jacomus-rides-Gen New Member

    Location:
    Guildford / London
    Looking at your saddle angle, you need to do some more fettling, it should be as near horizontal as possible!! A saddle nose down like that suggest that your bars are too low in relation to your flexibility, forcing you to crush your nads as you bend into the drops.

    I would recommend looking at your saddle height (should be around 109% of your inner leg length, from the top of your pedal to the top of the saddle, when the crank is in line with the seatpost (so around the 7 ''clock position) )

    If that is correct, and you still need the nose tipped down like that, I would recommend flipping your stem, or if you have the reach, try moving the saddle back on the rails.

    I certainly wouldn't drop them until you can ride with a horizontal saddle!
     
  8. Jacomus-rides-Gen

    Jacomus-rides-Gen New Member

    Location:
    Guildford / London
    p.s. Horizontal back for mortals is rarely achieved without dedicated training and a proper bike fit.

    You must work to overcome the effect of closing your hip angle - even if a rider manages to get a flat back, they may be losing tons of power by closing thier hips too much, and completely negate the aero advantage.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    roadiewill

    roadiewill New Member

    Location:
    Wiltshire
    thanks all, Il have a look tomorrow.

    hi there GF3!