It begins...

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
On Air Force One
At last, a ban on diesel cars entering a town centre outside of London...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-50292596

I pray fervently that this is the thin end of the wedge. Next the whole town. Then more towns. Then petrol cars. Then electric cars (over half of particulate emissions are from tyre and exhaust wear, which electric cars do nothing to alleviate).

It'll doubtless be a long road, but we're about to embark of a journey who's destination may be the severe curtailment of private car use. Less cars, less pollution, less danger....more cycling!
 

glasgowcyclist

Charming but somewhat feckless
Location
Scotland
Glasgow’s low emission zone restrictions on private cars take effect in 2022, when any diesel car made before 2014 and any petrol car made before 2005 will not be allowed in the city.

It’s not terribly ambitious but I suppose it’s a start. Hopefully it’ll become car-free eventually.
 

tom73

Über Member
Location
Yorkshire
Watched this on the news they asked people what they thought about. They came out with the normal anti stuff.
Every time they came out with yes but or but I need ect i just found myself thinking each time buy a bike.
One sort of made out that it may have something to do with making money out of higher electric car sales. :wacko:
Sadly they only showed one who totality got it and supported it.

Be great if this start to get rolled out as we can't carry on the way we are. But sadly many who can make it happen have closed minds.
 

NorthernDave

Never used Über Member
There are mutterings of something similar to come in Leeds, albeit not quite so draconian.
No real issue with it to be fair, but they really need to sort public transport out first. A bus from here into the city centre (5 miles) is scheduled to take 40 minutes, but often takes up to an hour.
That's not as a result of congestion, but due to idiots who don't have their money ready on boarding (and won't use the app), a load of new 20mph limits and traffic calming measures, and a series of tortuous rather than direct routes.
Plus First have a monopoly in the area, and as well as charging accordingly, are apparently up for sale as their parent company tries to offload them.
 

classic33

Legendary Member
There are mutterings of something similar to come in Leeds, albeit not quite so draconian.
No real issue with it to be fair, but they really need to sort public transport out first. A bus from here into the city centre (5 miles) is scheduled to take 40 minutes, but often takes up to an hour.
That's not as a result of congestion, but due to idiots who don't have their money ready on boarding (and won't use the app), a load of new 20mph limits and traffic calming measures, and a series of tortuous rather than direct routes.
Plus First have a monopoly in the area, and as well as charging accordingly, are apparently up for sale as their parent company tries to offload them.
Isn't that what the work on the Headrow is going to address, again! Watch out for the six digit fleet numbers, they're on hybrid buses. Many converted to a smaller engine powering a generator, with the ability to help if required. "Geoffrey Hilditch" doesn't work too well on inclines round here.

FirstBus & Arriva are up for sale.
 

tom73

Über Member
Location
Yorkshire
Totally right busses need fixing not sure any of the clowns know how though.
I've had to get off more than once as the countless reader won't work.
For years the ones round here would not use the smart bus lines as each one had been fitted with a different system.
So each bus has to be fitted with a different reader. Meaning tying down given busses to each route only.
Meanwhile our council's next ease congestion "green project" is turning 2 acres of urban park into a gyratory. :wacko:
 

NorthernDave

Never used Über Member
Isn't that what the work on the Headrow is going to address, again! Watch out for the six digit fleet numbers, they're on hybrid buses. Many converted to a smaller engine powering a generator, with the ability to help if required. "Geoffrey Hilditch" doesn't work too well on inclines round here.

FirstBus & Arriva are up for sale.
Aye, the Headrow scheme is this year's miracle cure to all our traffic woes.
Not sure how it will significantly improve public transport, especially as some buses had already been routed away from The Headrow due to the new (and still unfinished!) cycle lane on New York Street.

Plus, if you were going to put in a cross city centre cycling scheme, would you choose a route with the stiff climb up Eastgate and The Headrow, or go along the flat Duncan Street / Boar Lane route to tie in to existing infrastructure at City Square?

Oh, and there is still no news on the monorail...
 
OP
Drago

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
On Air Force One
I'm not so sure that extra spending on public transport is the total answer. The bone idle lazy british public will have to be forced from their cars kicking and screaming, and buses made by Bentley with a free foot massage service won't tempt them from their cars - they need to be dragged kicking and screaming, given no choice in the matter.

Not all of course, but the majority of people are fit and able enough to be making these local journeys on foot or by bicycle. If everyone that was reasonably able to do so did, then there would likely be sufficient bus capacity left for those sho cannot.

And then there is the segment who don't really need to physically travel at all. A lot of people in paper pushing or back room service industries don't actually need to travel to that office to sit at that desk. Modern information technology systems makes that just as easy to do from home in many cases. and that's something else that will eventually change.

But at each stage drivers need to be forced to desist. A political party in government will never grasp that nettle or they'll never be elected again. However, devolve those powers to local authorities and that is less of a consideration.

All sorts of ifs, buts, and speculation ahead, but at last we can see the thin end of the wedge. If Evacuation Marillion were serious about the environment instead of simply behaving like twits then this is the sort of thing they should be campaigning directly for in every town and city.
 

tom73

Über Member
Location
Yorkshire
@Drago has a good point money is only part of it a lot of unwillingness or not admitting they don't know what to do is rapped up as "we need more funding". Carrots only do so much it's going to need a few sticks along the way. Handing more control at a local level will help but only if it's real power and not left to elected members to control it. Our's for example has set carbon neutral target by 2030 asked about funding or will they be asking for ideas. It's been made clear no money set aside and no consultation. So basically no money and no plan.
Well ok they have one a new plan for car parking that states key to economic development is making it easier to get to town centre by car. :wacko:
 

Diogenes

brr, summer's over
And then there is the segment who don't really need to physically travel at all. A lot of people in paper pushing or back room service industries don't actually need to travel to that office to sit at that desk. Modern information technology systems makes that just as easy to do from home in many cases. and that's something else that will eventually change.
Not sure that's a good idea as it blurs the line between work and personal life. IMO it's likely to lead to employers making more demands on staff and the unpaid extra hours increasing. I don't think this helps in trying to create a good work/life balance and promoting such plans may well lead to mental health and stress issues down the line.

To my mind, work is for the workplace.

(typed in my kitchen on the work laptop)
 
The main problem that I see is that people are commuting far too much!
It used to be that people used to work in their own towns. A few commuted in from the surrounding areas but the majority of the workers were local who tended to spend their money in the town which helped to support the local shops .
With the advent of factory closures people were forced to seek employment further afield. Cuts in public transport meant that some routes were taken off causing people to use other means to get to work .
Taxing polluting vehicles which enter towns and cities sounds very good in theory but will have huge costs which will have to be passed on to customers.
Switching to online shopping isn't going to help either by building vast distribution centres miles from anywhere, where goods are brought in in lorries and then probably delivered back to near where they came from.
The whole system needs a total re think!
 
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