Jenny Jones #curfewformen

I suggest you read the thread again, this time with open eyes. :okay:
Your post meets the definition of violence and goes against the forum rules.
 
Your definition of violence is very odd, however, please report any posts you feel are constitute "violence" to you, or anyone else. :okay:
Thank you for your advice. It's a shame you don't feel some people are able to show self control or abide by the forum rules, particularly on a thread such as this.

EDIT to point out, the definition of violence I am using, is the same as the ones in the reports used to support the OP. :okay:
 
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Cirrus

Active Member
Men are socialised to turn their feelings outwards to violence and confrontation. Women are socialised to turn it inwards to self-harm.
Women will also turn it toward their children, which unless it's picked up will go pretty much unreported so the extend will be unknown.

I know that my own mother's depression and anger manifested itself with physical and emotional violence directed at me as a child
 

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
Women will also turn it toward their children, which unless it's picked up will go pretty much unreported so the extend will be unknown.

I know that my own mother's depression and anger manifested itself with physical and emotional violence directed at me as a child
Yes that can happen.

Imo we need a realistic reappraisal of what it means to be a parent, and the nuts and bolts, practical and emotional of parenting.

Many parents are either ill equipped, or ill supported, and that can of course impact the children.

The 'joys' of motherhood are often 'sold' to women, as an aspiration, but the downsides of it all, in our society as its currently ordered not so much.

It's low status, and unpaid work, in reality, despite the supposed venerating of the 'mother figure' on occasion.

The reality is often otherwise.

As ever education, and empowerment of girls women, equal parenting role modelling, good support from both state and community, free access to reproductive health services, can all go a long way to making it better for both parents, and the children we raise.

Some men still seem to see the day to day work of parenting as in some way beneath them.

I was 'lucky*' enough to have men around me who saw raising kids as an equal shared task.

The resulting men, may or may not be testament to that, but I don't think it's just coincidence that they've not got sexist views on parenting responsibility.

Or much else, as it happens.

* it wasn't by luck, it was by design.. But that's another story.
 
Yes that can happen.

Imo we need a realistic reappraisal of what it means to be a parent, and the nuts and bolts, practical and emotional of parenting.

Many parents are either ill equipped, or ill supported, and that can of course impact the children.

The 'joys' of motherhood are often 'sold' to women, as an aspiration, but the downsides of it all, in our society as its currently ordered not so much.

It's low status, and unpaid work, in reality, despite the supposed venerating of the 'mother figure' on occasion.

The reality is often otherwise.

As ever education, and empowerment of girls women, equal parenting role modelling, good support from both state and community, free access to reproductive health services, can all go a long way to making it better for both parents, and the children we raise.

Some men still seem to see the day to day work of parenting as in some way beneath them.

I was 'lucky*' enough to have men around me who saw raising kids as an equal shared task.

The resulting men, may or may not be testament to that, but I don't think it's just coincidence that they've not got sexist views on parenting responsibility.

Or much else, as it happens.

* it wasn't by luck, it was by design.. But that's another story.
Isn't one of the reasons that motherhood is sometimes (and only by some) viewed as low status, a result of the campaigning by feminists?
 

Mugshot

Cracking a solo.
Some interesting points on this quote from another thread.:okay:
Two personal comments. You perhaps need to review the forum rules.
Please avoid the personal comments. They go against board rules and are within the definition of violence.
That post is misrepresenting other peoples view and meets the definition of violence.
It would be better if people used self control, especially on a thread like this. I'm sure the mods have more than enough to do.
Your post meets the definition of violence and goes against the forum rules.
Again, that post meets the definition of violence and goes against the forum rules. Please respond to the content rather than the poster.
Thank you for your advice. It's a shame you don't feel some people are able to show self control or abide by the forum rules, particularly on a thread such as this.
I'm sensing a pattern here, not just in this thread either. That slap on the wrist you got the other day is really smarting isn't it?
 

AuroraSaab

Über Member
You hinted at it in a previous post - testosterone. Adolescent males are a complete mess of hormones brought about from an evolutionary state whereby at that age they are expected/required to fight for resources, stake their claim etc. In a geological timescale, we're only one swing away from the tree and if you look at male behaviour in a number of species - chimps, dolphins, ducks - it's much easier to understand adolescent male behaviour in humans.
I agree with some of your points but I'd say socialisation plays a bigger role than hormones. It's also due to your brain not maturing fully until you are 25 and thus young people having poor impulse control.

Agreed that there are conflicts between how boys are expected to act and what life is actually like, which causes tension and aggression in some of them. But again this is how we are socialising our kids - our society is awash with porn and popular culture that encourages all kids to aspire to stuff they are never going to attain. Which is why I have said several times that we need a cultural shift in attitudes - of all of us, because this culture isn't healthy for boys and young men either.

I know you aren't saying hormones = 'Boys will be boys' as an excuse for violence or sex crimes, but it's still a view some people hold that these things are inevitable, rather than a behavioural issue that can be addressed if we have the will to do so.
 
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I agree with some of your points but I'd say socialisation plays a bigger role than hormones. It's also due to your brain not maturing fully until you are 25 and thus young people having poor impulse control.

Agreed that there are conflicts between how boys are expected to act and what life is actually like, which causes tension and aggression in some of them. But again this is how we are socialising our kids - our society is awash with porn and popular culture that encourages all kids to aspire to stuff they are never going to attain. Which is why I have said several times that we need a cultural shift in attitudes - of all of us, because this culture isn't healthy for boy and young men either.

I know you aren't saying hormones = 'Boys will be boys' as an excuse for violence or sex crimes, but it's still a view some people hold that these things are inevitable, rather than a behavioural issue that can be addressed if we have the will to do so.
Are there many societies around the world, where gender roles differ vastly from those here in the west? I think most animal societies follow gender roles too, which raises a few questions when considering nature v nurture.
 
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