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New Bike Advice For Newbie

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by theboytaylor, 28 Nov 2007.

  1. theboytaylor

    theboytaylor Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Charlton, London
    Hi,

    Just signed up as I was impressed by the amount of useful advice I found with a few rough and ready searches of the threads. I've been cycling to work in London for a few months on an old Raleigh Pursuit but it's died. I was really enjoying it and now want to get a nice new bike for the new Year.

    Three 2008 models have caught my eye:
    http://www.evanscycles.com/product.jsp?style=87037
    http://www.evanscycles.com/product.jsp?style=86324
    http://www.evanscycles.com/product.jsp?style=87296

    Any recommendations/experience with any of their earlier versions? I'm erring towards the Bianchi, but open to suggestions

    Cheers
     
  2. Tynan

    Tynan Veteran

    Location:
    e4
    everyone seems to like bianchi

    go somewhere that'll let you take them for a spin
     
  3. I notice that Bianchi is Campag and the other two are Shimano...you might prefer one brake "hood" over the other. (I have only Campag but I fancy trying the seemingly bigger Shimano hoods sometime :biggrin: )
    Also, it may be helpful to start with Keo pedals (Bianchi) against the rat traps of the other two.

    The Bianchi colour has 'jumped the shark' though... :biggrin: Black is the new Celeste :sad:
     
  4. gbb

    gbb Legendary Member

    Location:
    Peterborough
    Hi Theboytaylor and welcome ...

    Tynans right, try find a shop / shops and test ride them.

    I have the 05 Via Nirone Xenon 9 speed with alloy frame. Flawless in every sense but i didnt like the 34T compact ring. Too much of a jump between 50 and 34T for the flat areas round here. No problem, a 40T goes on, cost around £15, easy to do and makes it much more user friendly. By the same token, a compact may be just what youre looking for.
    Ambrosio rims and Miche hubs have been bombproof on mine (i misjudged a kerb just last week...christ it didnt half bang the wheels as i went up...no damage thankfully. :biggrin: )

    Our LBS have the Felts...quite nice looking...sorry, nothing more to offer than that.


    Ultimately, they're all fine bikes...down to personal choice. (but i'd go for the Bianchi...but i'm as biased as a biased thing can get :biggrin: )
     
  5. domtyler

    domtyler Über Member

    You can get an all carbon Focus Cayo for £800 smackers nowadays.
     
  6. John the Monkey

    John the Monkey Frivolous Cyclist

    Location:
    Crewe
    Evans have lots of pretty good deals on the 2007 range too - well worth a look (I was in looking at some in the Manchester branch t'other day).

    The Pinnacle range seemed to have decent equipment levels for the price, might be worth a look (I was in asking about the Dahon Jack, so only had a quick look over the road bikes)

    One thing to think about if you're commuting in British conditons is whether the bike will take proper mudguards (and if not, whether you mind arriving dirty/wet).
     
  7. theboytaylor

    theboytaylor Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Charlton, London
    I'm actually looking to use the Cyclescheme and fortunately there's a shop not too far from me which not only supports the scheme but stocks both the Trek and Bianchi.

    Looks like I've got my next few Saturdays planned out then....

    And Aperitif, yeah, the main thing holding me back from just going for the Bianchi is the colour, rather lairy.

    I've read in C+ the Felt can take mudguards but not seen much detail on the Bianchi yet.
     
  8. John the Monkey

    John the Monkey Frivolous Cyclist

    Location:
    Crewe
    I'm sure the LBS will be able to fill you in on which bikes are capable in that regard - look for eyelets on the forks and rear dropouts, and a fair amount of clearance between the brake calipers and tyres.

    The alternative is to fit clip on guards (like raceblades) - from what I hear, these are ok, but you'll get wetter than you would with full guards.
     
  9. Tynan

    Tynan Veteran

    Location:
    e4
    I like that bianchi colour, it's nice

    from my squinting to date there's not much going on in the mudguards/rack dept for bianchis though
     
  10. theboytaylor

    theboytaylor Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Charlton, London
    To be honest, mudguards ain't the end of the world as I can keep a change of kit at work (along with all my shirts, etc).

    Main issue is getting a good bike that won't let me down and I can use on weekends for longer rides as well as zipping to work and back.

    With the cyclescheme I can afford to spend that little bit more than I would have done.

    GBB - thanks for the point about the ring. The sort of issue I wouldn't have thought of at all.

    Thanks all - pls keep the suggestions coming
     
  11. Jacomus-rides-Gen

    Jacomus-rides-Gen New Member

    Location:
    Guildford / London
    Personally, the Trek gets my vote, especially as you can ask for it to come as a tripple (which is a must for me), I also love my Trek MTB to pieces, even though I didn't go Trek as my roadbike.

    About mudguards - I have a set of SKS raceblades, but I never use the front one because there is no way you are catching me put a mudguard on a set of £270 forks! The rear mudguard is different though - I loathe the line of road carp that get fired up your crack by the rear wheel when it rains, so the reaceblade is perfect for stopping that happen, and I can leave it off when the weather is fine.

    It is handy to put some frame protectors on the seat stays where the guards rest though.

    As the others have said - go for some test rides, you will get on one of them and think "this is The One" and nothing anyone can say will stop you from buying that one :biggrin: :biggrin: :sad: check out Specialised too - their Allez range is brill.
     
  12. Avoid buying a bike from Evans if you can possibly help it, their managing director is a devil worshipping alien baby eater with connections in the masons. Your details will go into their data base and they'll start exposing you to invisible mind altering force beams which will render you impotent and make you vote for the Liberals. Honest.
     
  13. theboytaylor

    theboytaylor Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Charlton, London
    Thanks Mickle,

    That could have turned out nasty. Have a few days off work and bike scouting is deffo on the schedule (although the missus doesn't realise this yet!)
     
  14. Jacomus-rides-Gen

    Jacomus-rides-Gen New Member

    Location:
    Guildford / London
    I agree with mickle about the MD of Evans - don't whatever you do let their apes take your bike in for a service. Not only will it cost you literally hundreds of pounds in labour alone, your bike will come back with more wrong than when it went in.
     
  15. fossyant

    fossyant Ride It Like You Stole It!

    Location:
    South Manchester
    If it's a commuting bike then mudguards are 100% needed... makes your trip much better and you'll cycle 100% of the time. From a die hard roadie, whose both road bikes won't accept any guards, if it's a day to day bike, like my mtb thingy/commuter, then guards are it. They look "ship" in summer, but it rains a lot over here so you won't get a wet ass....

    Good rides are for the 'proper bikes' so if it's damp, I get damp. etc.... but getting to work comfortable/dry(ish) then an orrible guarded beastie it is....