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New chain slipping

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by TheDutch, 6 Jun 2008.

  1. TheDutch

    TheDutch New Member

    Hi all, I have a beginner / tech crossover problem; I suspect the answer to which is money and time.

    I was lucky enough to snap the chain on my aging bike a couple of days ago, and have today installed a new Shimano HG50 chain. Having done so the chain constantly slips when a reasonable amount of force is applied, though light pedalling is OK. The cassette is a Shimano HG-C 8 speed type ah, and it slips to varying degrees on every sprocket. I cannot say for sure how long it's been on for as I didn't put it on.

    My suspicion is that the sprockets are worn out and should be replaced with the new chain, but it does not look (to my exceedingly untrained eye) to be massively worn out. Are there any other reasons this may be happening? Is the new chain likely to 'bed in' whatsoever?

    Here are a couple of terrible camera phone pics of the suspect:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    So there you go; new cassette or something else?

    Many thanks,

    Dutch
     
  2. domtyler

    domtyler Über Member

    You guessed right! Always replace the cassette at the same time as the chain as they [sort of] wear together.
     
  3. dodgy

    dodgy Veteran

    Location:
    Wirral
    There will be a small amount of bed in time, but I'm afraid it's more likely that you left your chain change until too late. When a chain is in use it stretches over time until it no longer 'fits' the sprockets properly, so the sprockets start to wear (sorry if this is an egg sucking lesson).

    If you change your chain regularly enough (use a chain measuring gizmo to know when is the right time), you can massively extend the life of your cassette and chainrings.

    DAve.
     
  4. walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    new cassette
     
  5. OP
    OP
    TheDutch

    TheDutch New Member

    Well that's 3 out of 3 then. Will grab one tomorrow. Thanks for the expert opinions.
     
  6. If you have a old cassette and a new chain it will slip but if you get a new cassette and a new chain it will be fine. If you change your chain ever 6 months or so you will not need to buy a new cassette for years as it will keep its shape for longer.

    So yes you do need to buy a new cassette.
     
  7. Blue

    Blue Legendary Member

    Location:
    Ireland
    I agree with that.

    I purchased my first road bike 3 years ago. During the years I have replaced the chains as soon as they were worn and have only had to replace the original cassette last week.
     
  8. domtyler

    domtyler Über Member

    Shouldn't it be measured in miles rather than months? Not much wear if it's just left in the shed! :thumbsup:

    Say, every 2000 miles?
     
  9. dodgy

    dodgy Veteran

    Location:
    Wirral
    No, it should be measured by 'measuring' it.

    Dave.
     
  10. walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    yes your right Dom,

    I would give it 3k miles to be honest, unless your running top end gear which wear's quicker
     
  11. OP
    OP
    TheDutch

    TheDutch New Member

    Age is meaningless - my steed is 15 years old now and I think it's only on it's second chain, not because I haven't used it, but used it until destruction as in this case. If I did more miles I would certainly have a better maintenance regime, but this lax approach only seems to have cost me one new cassette in 7 years, I think I can live with that.
     
  12. Well yes and no there is no way of saying a chain will last 6 months or 2000miles. there is so many for a chain to wear out riding hard, not lubing, leaving the bike out, hi mileage....... It is beat to just keep checking it and then changing it when it has worn out.
     
  13. dodgy

    dodgy Veteran

    Location:
    Wirral
    Park Tools CC-3, best 6 quid I ever spent on a cycle tool.

    Dave.
     
  14. That is one way of doing it.

    And the thing is 9 and 10 speed chains will wear out faster then single speed chains as they are thicker.
     
  15. Joe24

    Joe24 More serious cyclist than Bonj

    Location:
    Nottingham
    My last chain lasted about 5/6 weeks:sad:
    I take care of it, lubing it and cleaning it, but it lasted about 1200miles.
    They do normally last about 1500miles though, which still isnt long enough.
    I had the cassette replaced last time though because that was worn, i had about 2 chains on that until i forgot to measure it and what felt like 2 weeks was a month :thumbsup: