No Vac Passport.

I don't understand how a vaccination passport is discriminatory.
The formidable pubco/brewing lobby does but according to an Ipsos/MORI poll 62% of you approve of the requirement for entry to pubs.
Andrew Bridgen says it is discriminatory, I consider Bridgen to be susceptible to lobby interests.
It would be highly cynical of me to suggest that most of the wallets being opened often and freely in pubs belong to the young.
 

Bollo

Failed Tech Bro
Location
Winch
A group of 40 Tory MPs have joined Jezza in opposing a vaccination passport scheme, with Sir Graham Brady describing the idea as “... divisive and discriminatory”. Doesn't Sir Graham understand these are two reasons why this government would consider doing something.
 

Ajax Bay

Guru
Location
East Devon
Ditch the 'passport' word. To fly people have for some time needed certification of a negative PCR test
. . . .
I reckon the whole 'vaccine certification' thing is being maintained to encourage vaccine take-up, when offered, in the under 30s.
From this afternoon's briefing: "COVID Status Certification" is the term pushed for use by the PM.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
My elderly mum got a card including her name and NHS number with details confirming which vaccine batch she received for her first one... if they give out cards with the second vaccine that would prove people have had them and when.
I too got a card when I had mine.

Im unsure of the ultimate utility of such an idea. While it reduces the chances of doing so in some circumstances, being a vaccine recipient does not actually stop a person carrying the infection and transmitting it to other people.

This being the case, all it ultimately proves is that you've twice had a needle stuck in you, and nothing more. You can still walk in thenpub and pass it on to some other shcmuck,
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
Whatever you call it, we need them, if only to keep the 'Grey Pound' flowing.
I've spoken to several friends of 1950s vintage. The unanimous feeling is that, without certification, we will not be pursuing our interests in trains, photography, dining out and so on, where it involves mixing in an uncertified crowd.
Lady Byegad and I are several thousand pounds 'in funds' due to not spending in shops, cafes, pubs, joy rides on trains, theatre or whatever. While the Hon' Number 1 and Hon' Number 2 sons will be pleased, more to inherit! I doubt our absence from our usual haunts alone will slow the recovery, but there are millions of old duffers, like us, who have vulnerabilities to covid who will not risk infection in a place where we have no idea who may be infectious, even after both our jabs.
Pre-covid, we would go, mid-week to Whitby* for the day having coffee, a meal, and shopping, a day out could easily see us spend well over £200 between us, in Whitby. Moreover we would often, in our 70s be among the youngest people there.
Without assurances in the form of certificated entry to indoor venues, while we might one day go, we will be taking a packed lunch and spending the petrol money at our local garage and nothing else. Our holidays, most years taken in England, mid-week mini-breaks, always taken in England, will be a thing of the past if we cannot eat out, visit venues or the theatre.
So much for certification limiting freedom, the lack of certification will limit ours, and that of many more people like us.


*Or many other places, including that well publicised ophthalmologist approved destination Barnard Castle.
 

matticus

Veteran
Im unsure of the ultimate utility of such an idea. While it reduces the chances of doing so in some circumstances, being a vaccine recipient does not actually stop a person carrying the infection and transmitting it to other people.
The jabs massively reduce your chance of transmission. The science is out there.

(You can't gather near other people with ZERO risk. )
 

Archie_tect

De Skieven Architek... aka Penfold + Horace
Location
Northumberland
I too got a card when I had mine.

Im unsure of the ultimate utility of such an idea. While it reduces the chances of doing so in some circumstances, being a vaccine recipient does not actually stop a person carrying the infection and transmitting it to other people.

This being the case, all it ultimately proves is that you've twice had a needle stuck in you, and nothing more. You can still walk in thenpub and pass it on to some other shcmuck,
[/QUO
Everyone has to be sensible still.
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
The formidable pubco/brewing lobby does but according to an Ipsos/MORI poll 62% of you approve of the requirement for entry to pubs.
Andrew Bridgen says it is discriminatory, I consider Bridgen to be susceptible to lobby interests.
It would be highly cynical of me to suggest that most of the wallets being opened often and freely in pubs belong to the young.
The grey pound is what keeps places going, week in week out. While the 'big night out is certainly worth a lot of money, the daytime grey visitor helps keep chefs, bar staff and waiters in full time employment. Businesses need both to thrive.
 

matticus

Veteran
Whatever you call it, we need them, if only to keep the 'Grey Pound' flowing.
I've spoken to several friends of 1950s vintage. The unanimous feeling is that, without certification, we will not be pursuing our interests in trains, photography, dining out and so on, where it involves mixing in an uncertified crowd.
Lady Byegad and I are several thousand pounds 'in funds' due to not spending in shops, cafes, pubs, joy rides on trains, theatre or whatever. While the Hon' Number 1 and Hon' Number 2 sons will be pleased, more to inherit! I doubt our absence from our usual haunts alone will slow the recovery, but there are millions of old duffers, like us, who have vulnerabilities to covid who will not risk infection in a place where we have no idea who may be infectious, even after both our jabs.
Pre-covid, we would go, mid-week to Whitby* for the day having coffee, a meal, and shopping, a day out could easily see us spend well over £200 between us, in Whitby. Moreover we would often, in our 70s be among the youngest people there.
Without assurances in the form of certificated entry to indoor venues, while we might one day go, we will be taking a packed lunch and spending the petrol money at our local garage and nothing else. Our holidays, most years taken in England, mid-week mini-breaks, always taken in England, will be a thing of the past if we cannot eat out, visit venues or the theatre.
So much for certification limiting freedom, the lack of certification will limit ours, and that of many more people like us.
There is a massive ethical dilemma here, still to be solved; but it's hard to disagree with what you've written there.
 
Top Bottom