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Quill stem stuck - help!

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by Danny, 29 Jun 2008.

  1. Danny

    Danny Legendary Member

    Location:
    York
    I have to confess that one of my first posts on the old C+ forum was a somewhat complacent and dismissive response to claims that quill stems could get stuck, which was along the lines of "well it's never happened to me". years".

    OK - now it has happened to me :blush:

    How do I get the bugger out without performing major surgery on my bike?
     
  2. Undo the quill bolt a couple of turns then hit it with a nylon hammer. Repeat. This will drive the wedge out of the stem releasing it from the steerer.
     
  3. Smokin Joe

    Smokin Joe Legendary Member

    That's ok if it is the old style expanding wedge, but if it is one of the later type (I forget what they are called) it is probable that the stem has corroded into the steerer. In which case a search for threads on stuck seatposts would be the answer.
     
  4. asterix

    asterix Comrade Member

    Location:
    Limoges or York
    For the wedge style if like me, you haven't a nylon hammer - just pad with a piece of wood (ply's best, it won't split) of sufficient thickness.
     
  5. Danny

    Danny Legendary Member

    Location:
    York
    I think mine has a wedge so I'll try this.

    Presumably I need to take care that I don't undo the bolt so much that it becomes detached from the wedge.
     
  6. Danny

    Danny Legendary Member

    Location:
    York
    Mickle's a genius - it worked first time :blush:
     
  7. Often it's the wedge itself which has become corroded to the inside of the steerer. Stem wedges are often the lowest quality chunk of steel on your bike. When you come to install it make sure it's clean, free of rust and well coated in greaze, especially the threads and the surface of the wedge which engages the stem.
     
  8. I'm not a genius I just know how to hit stuff with hammers.
     
  9. bonj2

    bonj2 Guest

    This is one of the reason quill stems are shite. There is a reason for the invention of the threadless headset -they're what's called b e t t e r.
     
  10. fossyant

    fossyant Ride It Like You Stole It!

    Location:
    South Manchester
    Quills aren't shite - I perfer the look - far better aesthetics - OK you don't get a integrated option - but a good quality headset looks great.

    What I don't like about ahead systems are all the sticky out bolts - looks a mess on a road bike - fine on a MTB.

    The ahead system has great benefits, but for me the aesthetics are terrible. Take a Look at a Cinelli XA stem or the 3TTT Status and they are neat - hence why it's fitted to my road bikes..

    Bonj, you also know I am a saddo for neatness.

    I can see why ahead is better - far easier to adjust and you also get the neat and tidy integrated headset units, all spoilt by the big bolts on the stem.... Ahead is also better for changing stems - unbolt bars and change - quill types need one whole side of the bar hardware removing....

    Me I'm just fussy.........
     
  11. Yorkshireman

    Yorkshireman New Member

    Ahead sets are also uglier :?: Quill stems don't rust/stick if they get a little grease lathered on once a year, and at least you can easily adjust the h/bar height (unless you have a bike with a short head tube ... like mine :biggrin:).
     
  12. bonj2

    bonj2 Guest

    yeah they are neater - i'll give you that... it's nice on your bike for example, very elegant like the rest of the bike!. But my problem with them is they don't make sense like threadless headsets. I like things that are simple mechanically, for me something that is mechanically simple and obvious is something that is beautifully engineered. One thing provides force parallel to the steerer to create compression, then another thing provides force like a 'cuff' around the steerer holding it there. Easy. I've had a threaded one before and it kept getting loose, such that eventually the handlebars would be able to move relative to the wheel! Tightening up the quill would sort it temporarily, but it would soon go back like that again. Admittedly it was a cheapo bargain-basement-bin 'mtb', but what can you do? All the working are internal. yes there probably is something you , but it isn't cost effective/obvious, or both!
     
  13. Yorkshireman

    Yorkshireman New Member

    I don't find that one set is easier to adjust than the other ... they're just different. Quill stems are still available with two and sometimes four bolt h/bar clamps (getting a bit 'thin on the ground' though) :?:.
     
  14. mr Mag00

    mr Mag00 rising member

    Location:
    Deepest Dorset
    mine is stuck and no amount of hammering will move it and i have damaged the bolt now and damaged the top of the thread of the forks too, so all in all its fubar atm. im looking for a 1 inch ahead stem to fit to it now, what i like about it is easier to maintain doesnt take as long and i quite like the sturdy look, which im sure will loook silly on my road bike now.
     
  15. fossyant

    fossyant Ride It Like You Stole It!

    Location:
    South Manchester
    You won't get a 1" ahead easily - you'll need new forks to start with and a longer fork steerer !!!

    Stuck bits are as a result of a poor maintenance regime - doesn't matter what parts are fitted to any bike...........