Should all schoolchildren aspire to go to University

My nephew is taking a year out from uni just now after having a bit of a breakdown. After 2 years of geology he finally succumbed to the stress that the expectations of his parents and peers had created. He feels he was channelled into uni at an age when he wasn't sure what he wanted to do in life. He still doesn't but I've told him that at 21, he's still got plenty of time to find his niche. Some of us never do.
 
Location
Salford
My nephew is taking a year out from uni just now after having a bit of a breakdown. After 2 years of geology he finally succumbed to the stress that the expectations of his parents and peers had created. He feels he was channelled into uni at an age when he wasn't sure what he wanted to do in life. He still doesn't but I've told him that at 21, he's still got plenty of time to find his niche. Some of us never do.
Nearly, ahem, 50 and still looking
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
'What am I going to do?' is a very difficult question to answer and people should not be judged harshly for being honest and saying they don't know. Often the honesty is judged by other with personality differences as being things like a lack of 'drive' or 'guts' and so on.

Not only are most apprenticeships not worth much, but the economy in the 2010s is full of very low paid, low skill work with little prospects.

On the back of a difficult question to answer, people go for other easier questions to answer.

What makes the most money?
What is everyone else doing?
What do I 'enjoy'?
 

DCLane

Found in the Yorkshire hills ...
Working in a university it's not for everyone. And there are many jobs it's not appropriate for. My 18yo got his A-level results this morning and is off to study a more applied course at university (Mechanical Engineering at Lincoln), with most of his peers going to university - but not all.
 

Dayvo

Just passin' through
Absolutely not.

If a young person wants to pursue a career as a craftsman (plumber, mechanic, carpenter, electrician etc.) then they should be encouraged to do so. I worked as a hod carrier, on and off, for about 8 years and thoroughly enjoyed it and learned a lot about the building trade. I don't know if apprenticeships are available in GB anymore, but skilled people are very much needed.

Not everyone can be a media darling, IT designer, solicitor, accountant etc. (valuable jobs as they are), but people should be helped to find and follow the career they feel is right for them.

I went to university at the age of 35, but only because I thought I was going to be a translator and/or TEFL teacher. Now I just cut grass and love it.

Edited to correct poor spelling.
 
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Phaeton

Phaeton

Guru
Location
Oop North (ish)
Hopefully the message will get to those at the top & to filter some money out of universities & down to the practical people
 

Chris S

Guru
Location
Birmingham
I went to a Russell Group university and a former polytechnic. The amount of academic dishonesty, by both lecturers and students, was about the same in both. In my opinion non-vocational degrees from British universities are now useless and worthless.
 

Dayvo

Just passin' through
Oh, and another thing.

If a school-leaver lacks the qualifications for 'a career job' then I would also recommend voluntary work combined with travelling. This will open many doors, give you friends and memories for life, and experiences 'normal types' could only dream of.

And along the way, you could very well find the motivation and inspiration to make a difference, and find THAT job that is right for you.
 

Julia9054

Guru
Location
Knaresborough
Oh, and another thing.

If a school-leaver lacks the qualifications for 'a career job' then I would also recommend voluntary work combined with travelling. This will open many doors, give you friends and memories for life, and experiences 'normal types' could only dream of.

And along the way, you could very well find the motivation and inspiration to make a difference, and find THAT job that is right for you.
Travel and voluntary work are both admirable pursuits but you need to have a way of funding them. Most of us have to balance the pursuit of happiness with putting food on the table and a roof over our heads. If those things coincide then you have it made.
 
There's nothing wrong with going to University, it can be an end of itself, although, the loan system almost puts paid to that. Apprenticeships are ace if you can find one that's worth a salt and then get in. Competition is fierce.

What worries me slightly is the way universities are managing their funds and the profligacy of their spending. Right now, there's a downturn in applicants because there is simply not the numbers physically there, birth rates are still falling. To counteract this, in the last two years, uni's have started making unconditional offers and making up numbers via clearing, where courses available have jumped dramatically. It's simply not sustainable

If you want a good job, the route has not changed if that's were you want to go. Redbrick Uni, traditional course, milk round recruitment. You want to work for Shell or someone like that, you better have gone to the right Uni and not have come out with a 2nd.
 

Tracy

Active Member
Location
Newcastle
No i dont think its for everyone. There's nothing wrong with starting a job at the bottom and working their way up.
3 of mine went and 1 didnt. But they all earn roughly the same.
And one isn't working in a job that has anything to do with what she studied.
I've always just told them ...if they enjoy what they do and they'll never work a day in their lives.
 
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