1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Spanish for beginners

Discussion in 'CycleChat Cafe' started by gbb, 23 Mar 2008.

  1. gbb

    gbb Legendary Member

    Location:
    Peterborough
    :blush::blush::biggrin:

    So...how do i know which words are masc. and which are fem.

    ie

    casa...la casa...las casas.
    coche..el coche...los coches.

    If you take any word, how do you know whether to use la or el, las or los.

    Does that make sense ?
     
  2. rich p

    rich p ridiculous old lush

    Location:
    Brighton

    Che?
     
  3. rich p

    rich p ridiculous old lush

    Location:
    Brighton
    In my experince of Italian if it ends in 'a' it's feminine and 'o' it's masculine. Generally if t ends in anything else it's guesswork1 Don't know about Spanish but I suspect there is a similar rule of thumb
     
  4. punkypossum

    punkypossum Donut Devil

    Yup, that's pretty much it. Words ending in -o, -l, -r and -y are usually masculine.

    Nouns ending in -a, -ion, -dad/tad, -tud, -ed, -itis, -iz, -sis, -umbre are feminine.

    And then there are a few exceptions...
     
  5. Dayvo

    Dayvo Just passin' through

    Location:
    O' slO'
    Best just to go there and learn the hard easy way! Beats adult evening classes in the inner cities of England! :blush:
     
  6. gbb

    gbb Legendary Member

    Location:
    Peterborough
    No doubt that works...but a week in Spain and two weeks in Uruguay scarcely gives one (ooer...sound real posh dont i :biggrin:) the chance to learn anything substantial.
    Holidays in Spain and maybe a return to S America this year...i think it's time i stopped struggling and did something about it.

    So anyway, thanks peeps...i'm no wiser than when i started :blush::biggrin:
     
  7. Pete

    Pete Guest

    You just have to learn them by heart. There's no easy way, especially with nouns that end in a consonant. Get used to saying nouns with their definite or indefinite article. It's just as bad in French - and as for German with its unexpected neuters (das Kind .... das Mädchen....) :blush::biggrin::ohmy:

    There are 'catches' in Spanish too. "Agua" (water) is feminine, but you don't say "La agua" because of the clash of 'a's, you say "el agua". ¡Buena suerte!
     
  8. stevenb

    stevenb New Member

    Location:
    South Beds.
    I started to learn Itlian a few years back....but then gave it up....bit of a pointless language as only th Italians speak it........but I'd like to complete learning it....also Spanish and get fully up to spec in French.....French is my strongest of the three.
     
  9. Maz

    Maz Guru

    Like punkypossum said...there are a few exceptions to the rule, of the better known ones:
    La mano (the hand)
    El mapa (the map)
    El problema (the problem)

    Let me know if you've got more questions...I did my A-level Spanish recently and get to use it at work from time to time.
     
  10. Maz

    Maz Guru

    you should be wiser...read punkypossum's post.
     
  11. stevenb

    stevenb New Member

    Location:
    South Beds.
    I like that TV advert for Natwest (or at least I think its for Natwest)...where those three chaps are in Spain thinking of locations for an overseas call centre....
    The chap says 'Where?'...'or as the say in Espanol......Donde' :blush:
     
  12. gbb

    gbb Legendary Member

    Location:
    Peterborough

    No...:biggrin:

    I am realising my long long years since school are now working against me.
    I cant remember which are nouns, verbs etc etc etc. Then you (i) start to struggle even more.

    I get the gist of Punkys...but i'm realising there's no easy route. :blush:

    Thank'yall....keep it coming if it's of interest
     
  13. Maz

    Maz Guru

    a noun [in general terms] is a 'thing'...car, bike, house, paper, water etc etc
    a verb is an '-ing' word...one which identifies an action...pavent riding, red light jumping, etc etc [i chose those last 2 cos you're all too familiar with them, right? :becool:]
     
  14. gbb

    gbb Legendary Member

    Location:
    Peterborough
    :biggrin::ohmy: you've seen my riding then :biggrin::biggrin:
     
  15. Pete

    Pete Guest

    It now comes back to me: "---ma" usually means masculine and breaks the general rule that "----a" means feminine. I can think of several other examples: "el tema", "el sistema", "el programa". I think we're on words of Greek origin here, many of them technical.