State of the Planet

burntoutbanger

Über Member
Location
Devon
The dinosaurs didn’t bring about their own downfall.
I’m listening to a podcast at the moment called The End of The World. It sets out various reasons why life exists and how we are likely to end.
There is a concept called The Great Filter which all life has to go through. The asteroid was the filter for the dinosaurs. Climate change and limited resources is very likely to be our Great Filter.
You only get one shot at getting it right, you either pass through or fail.

I can't see every man, woman and child on this earth being wiped out by climate change and limited resources. I think small pockets of humans would survive. This correction to much smaller human numbers on this planet would then have a much smaller detrimental effect on the planet going forward.

The only thing I can see wiping out our race completely is something like an asteroid strike or nuclear war (even then I feel very small pockets may survive though back at near stoneage levels).

Granted global warming and a lack of resources could bring about a nuclear war.
 

stowie

Guru
[QUOTE 5488874, member: 9609"]Gove would probably make it through[/QUOTE]

Gove needed to be told that unblocking a toilet using a hoover was a bad idea. He may last the nuclear war, but I wouldn't bet that his survival skills would keep him alive much longer afterwards.
 

Unkraut

Master of the Inane Comment
Location
Germany
What we need is an ark or two.
We'll have to reestablished the ancient art of being an arkwright then. I'm sure lots of people will be ready to pitch in. I believe the French have also been inspired to do this by one of their national heroines.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTJw1QzL6PSrJFIuoB27qPp5-2zB0ZhN6jg9qtWmuxYO1mXrMAaYQ.jpg
 

MrPie

Telling it like it is since 1971
Location
Perth, Australia
'ang on, 'ang on.....the CO2 graph clearly shows we have a peak & trough every c10,000 years. The period of today's peak is consistent with history. The gradient of the peak is consistent with history. No?
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
The biggest disaster ever to hit this planet is the human race.
Of course it isn't. No matter how we alter the climate the planet will be here till the sun gobbles it up, whether we're here or not. If we want to prolong our stay here we've got to cut our reproduction until the population is down to a sustainable level. We won't do that of course, because of our "God given right" to have as many children as we please, even if it means demanding IVF treatment for those who can't reproduce naturally at everyone else's expense.

While we keep doing that cycling to work and getting the bus to Tescos is going to make bugger all difference.
 

dutchguylivingintheuk

Well-Known Member
The dinosaurs didn’t bring about their own downfall.
I’m listening to a podcast at the moment called The End of The World. It sets out various reasons why life exists and how we are likely to end.
There is a concept called The Great Filter which all life has to go through. The asteroid was the filter for the dinosaurs. Climate change and limited resources is very likely to be our Great Filter.
You only get one shot at getting it right, you either pass through or fail.
Maybe their poop held so much co2 that the planet got angry and wiped them out.. Or maybe that co2 is just complete BS and if there is man-made climate change it has various other causes.

[QUOTE 5487311, member: 9609"]Just a little snap shot at a few figures at the turn of the year

from
https://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/charctic-interactive-sea-ice-graph/


From the Antarctic, there has never been less sea ice at this time of the year
and look at the figures for this, average over the last 40 years at xmas was 8 million sq km, this year there is 6 - that is 25% LESS. this is not insignificant

They say it all has something to do with CO2, so let us have a look at the Keeling curve
https://scripps.ucsd.edu/programs/keelingcurve/

here is a snapshot of CO2 levels at xmas over the past 40 years
[/QUOTE]
What's the use of using data over the past 40 years if our planet is millions of years old? Putting those figures in a much longer timeframe gives a whole other picture.
 

Rusty Nails

We remember
Location
Here and there
I do my best not to be wasteful, I recycle a lot, buy unwrapped fruit and veg, my wife has become quite anti high air miles food, I use the car less and the bike more, the house is well insulated, I don't have the CH set too high. I admit to a very big weakness in that I like to fly to holiday in warmer countries twice a year.

I live in a modern world with out of town shopping precincts that require a car if you want to shop around, and a family that are spread out around the country that I like to visit.

In short I am one of those people who support the idea of a less wasteful world, and try to do my bit in a privileged middle-class sort of way, but fall far short of what I really could be doing. I feel that my piddling little efforts would be completely lost against some of the efforts of the rest of the world to continue with their waste and pollution so I and up just drifting along. Our politicians can't be ar*ed to do much so why should I?

Someone said earlier in this thread that we are not destroying the world, just the existence of the human race, which gave me a lot to think about. Perhaps this is true and if so isn't that just part of nature? I do not believe in a God so if we are just a species that lives and dies and rots away and that is the end of it, why should we expect the species to exist forever?

Sorry for a rather wandering, depressing sort of post, but perhaps that's what you get from such a dark, wet, miserable Monday morning. It's supposed to be sunny tomorrow so I hope I'll be a bit more cheerful and positive then.
 

Unkraut

Master of the Inane Comment
Location
Germany
I feel that my piddling little efforts would be completely lost against some of the efforts of the rest of the world to continue with their waste and pollution so I and up just drifting along. Our politicians can't be ar*ed to do much so why should I?
For the sake of conscience? I'm far from convinced at all the doom-mongering, but not polluting unnecessarily is good in its own right.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
Someone said earlier in this thread that we are not destroying the world, just the existence of the human race, which gave me a lot to think about. Perhaps this is true and if so isn't that just part of nature? I do not believe in a God so if we are just a species that lives and dies and rots away and that is the end of it, why should we expect the species to exist forever?
We are a species that exists because we are on a planet in which very rare conditions evolved to allow us to form, breed and multiply. That wasn't the case for billions of years before we came and it won't last for more than the blink of an eye in the lifetime of the universe.
 

Johnno260

Über Member
Location
East Sussex
Sad thing is we're killing the only known place in the universe that supports life.

I think I'm at the point where I re-cycle more waste, but it's a small drop in the ocean and I'm not convinced it all gets recycled since China stopped taking our waste, or we just move the waste from point A, to point B, and produce more carbon doing it.

Just watch something like Bear Grylls the island and look at all the junk that washes ashore it's a disgrace.

For some reason since I took up Astronomy it's made me more thoughtful of how we treat this world, sadly I think the human race will not live long enough to colonize anywhere else, it's sad, but I think that's probably a good thing..
 

Flying_Monkey

Toll Collector on the Road to Nowhere
What's the use of using data over the past 40 years if our planet is millions of years old? Putting those figures in a much longer timeframe gives a whole other picture.
Well, yeah, but one that's of varying relevance. I mean, sure, there was once a time when free atmospheric oxygen was are and its sudden increase was the main threat to live as it had then evolved, but I'm not sure you'd regard oxygen as a big problem these days, if you are coming from the point-of-view of human beings and other life as it exists now...

In terms of what is relevant to life as it exists now, the scientific research into climate change over thousands of years (what is called paleoclimatology) backs up the findings on recent decades, showing that we are going through an unprecedented increase in atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), and increasingly other greenhouse gasses too - the most dangerous of which is methane (CH4), a far more potent greenhouse gas than CO2. Unfortunately there is also a cascade effect that may well occur should atmospheric temperatures increase further which could mean the melting of the currently permanently frozen tundra in northern Canada and Russia, releasing an enormous amount of CH4, which will in turn accelerate warming still further...

Making some vague reference about change over billions of years doesn't enable you to dismiss the reality of what is going on now and the scientific research that has demonstrated unequivocally how serious it is.
 
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