Statues, then

Location
London
But returning to telly progs of old, and war n stuff.

I do remember something called "The World at War" that my Pa and Bro seemed inexplicably keen on watching.

The series seemed to go on for interminable years, on BBC 2 Sunday afternoons, whenever it was grey drizzly weather, and there was also that extra drear thought of the weekend coming to a close...

Even just glimpses of the endless grainy footage, of people having unimaginably horrible times in the trenches, or being blown up in variously nasty ways, certainly served to impress upon my young mind the full inglorious horror of war.

And how we should really do our very utmost to avoid it.

And build peace, and humane coexistance instead,

The whole 'Prancing Generals' on snorting steeds goes counter to all that imo.
The World at War was a truly excellent series and shoots the ground from under some folks who push a lazy view that the 70s was just crap.
It was made at a time when there were still loads of folk who had been there on all sides to interview.
My mum I think kind of subtly engineered things so that I saw the Holocaust episode.
And it leaves folk in no doubt about war- especially the last one or two episodes.
I assume father and brother took this message from it as well.
It's a masterwork - the title sequence with that music still gets me - Olivier's narration is superb - it's still shown a lot of course and I really saw it properly on one of its endless reruns.
Note - not a lot of trenches in it.
 
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Location
London
head down and crack on with your own life. I do and it involves shops once a week and daily calls to my parents , rest of time is mine , I'm learning new skills too :smile:
wrong thread?
 

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
And many people still haven’t learnt and others are denying that the worst atrocities even took place. Populism, jingoism and sabre rattling all go hand in hand.
But at the same time we have (I think) fewer wars ongoing right now, than anytime in previous history.

Still too many awful things happening, Yemen, Syria, and elsewhere, but perhaps theres cause for quiet hope.

And one significant populist less - as of last week :cheers:

It was IMO a very good series, trying to document the worst conflict lnown in a way that was neither glorious, jingoistic or triumphalist. I think it did a pretty fair job telling the story and showing the full graphic horror and misery of war.
Yup, I don't expect it would have been considered suitable watching if anything otherwise.

Certainly had the desired effect on me.:blink:
 
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mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
head down and crack on with your own life. I do and it involves shops once a week and daily calls to my parents , rest of time is mine , I'm learning new skills too :smile:
Good for you :okay:

Cracking on here as well - plenty of work still to do - sadly no parents left to call - but hey - that's just how it goes sometimes.

Learning new skills and staying engaged with the world - exchanging ideas and all that too :okay:
 

Joey Shabadoo

My pronouns are "He", "Him" and "buggerlugs"
In 1914, the largest formation any British officer had commanded in the field was a brigade - about 5000 men. This grew to Divisions of 30,000 and more. At the start of the war there were 400 officers who had been through Staff College and been trained in handling large forces with all the logistics and co-ordination required. By 1915 there were only 100 of these officers left. British officers very much lived with their men and led from the front at the war's outset but they were literally slaughtered by doing so. They had to be forced into stepping back from the front to do their job properly. Even so, senior British officers visited and spent more time in the front line than any other country's army. Over 200 Generals were killed, wounded or taken prisoner.

Blackadder is a comedy programme, not a documentary.
 

DRM

Veteran
Location
West Yorks
In 1914, the largest formation any British officer had commanded in the field was a brigade - about 5000 men. This grew to Divisions of 30,000 and more. At the start of the war there were 400 officers who had been through Staff College and been trained in handling large forces with all the logistics and co-ordination required. By 1915 there were only 100 of these officers left. British officers very much lived with their men and led from the front at the war's outset but they were literally slaughtered by doing so. They had to be forced into stepping back from the front to do their job properly. Even so, senior British officers visited and spent more time in the front line than any other country's army. Over 200 Generals were killed, wounded or taken prisoner.

Blackadder is a comedy programme, not a documentary.
But within the comedy lays the truth of what was going on, I also think that in reality the whole world is still fighting WW1, the fallout from it is direct cause of WW2, then all the proxy wars fought during the cold war, right down to the civil wars in the Balkans, all down to who was on which side in WW1.
 
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mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
For me the best 'War' film was Blackadder which showed the 'brass' as they were, completly out of touch with reality

Wars are not won by 'Generals' but by suffering and death. :sad:

View: https://youtu.be/NgyB6lwE8E0
And unimaginably grim suffering and deaths.

So it's our job to make more effort at peacemaking, and justice, and celebrate that side of humanity.
Rather than glorifying conflict.

But within the comedy lays the truth of what was going on, I also think that in reality the whole world is still fighting WW1, the fallout from it is direct cause of WW2, then all the proxy wars fought during the cold war, right down to the civil wars in the Balkans, all down to who was on which side in WW1.
What do they say

"Many a true word spoken in jest.."

Plus far more people will have settled down to watch Black Adder, and been impressed by that ending, than will have committed to a lengthy documentary, on the true grimness of war.

And then it's often resources, in addition to nationalism, and expansionism, that bring about wars - soil, oil, access to seaboards etc.

Just hope we can avoid going to war over water, and livable climates next. :sad:
 

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
https://www.theguardian.com/comment...little-closer-at-its-cabal-of-philanthropists

Which is where we came in. Erect a statue to Sir Jim for his services to tax avoidance.

How about, in a cunning inversion of the American colonialists' cri de guerre and an appeal to clean up democracy, "No representation without taxation!"?
Yes I reread your original post for some reason, only this morning.

Maybe we shouldn't have bronze or marble statues anymore at all.

Only those facepainted 'living ones' that you still see occasionally.

Folks can reenact something they feel is important to them for half a day, then leave the stage free for the next person..
 

Ian H

I am an ancient randonneur, & I stop often for tea
Location
East Devon
Talking of statues, I read somewhere that certain fellow countrymen were getting their knickers in a twist because a US president had been unkind or something about Churchill's bust. So I thought I'd share cartoonist Martin Rowson's take on it.
570392
 
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