The many benefits of leaving the EU.

Unkraut

Master of the Inane Comment
Location
Germany
Redwood does make a good point, where is the bonfire of the crap EU rules and regulations?
Do you have any specific examples?

When I left the UK at the end of Major's government, I had no job security and had to accept temporary renewable contracts for a job in local government that by its nature was permanent. This was before the UK signed up to the social chapter. That was definitely a benefit to the workforce in things like holiday entitlement.

Now the UK is free of any obligation to follow the requirements of this legislation, do you think the government is intending to implement even better working conditions, or little by little whittle them away back to the situation I experienced in the late 90's?
 

JBGooner

Über Member
It was cancelled when the incoming government discovered there were no 'crap EU rules and regulations' with which to fuel a bonfire.
Because the EU is the embodiment of administrative perfection?
Aye, right. ;)
 

JBGooner

Über Member
Do you have any specific examples?
The tampon tax.

Another change, forbidden under EU rules, that was doing the rounds was preferential beer tariffs in pubs i.e. cutting or even abolishing the duty on beer that is sold in pubs whilst increasing it on beer sold in supermarkets. Revenue neutral whilst saving our pubs. :okay:
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
The tampon tax.

Another change, forbidden under EU rules, that was doing the rounds was preferential beer tariffs in pubs i.e. cutting or even abolishing the duty on beer that is sold in pubs whilst increasing it on beer sold in supermarkets. Revenue neutral whilst saving our pubs. :okay:
how much is a bottle of 'vin du table' in France, less than a couple of Euro and yet the same wine here is £6-7 and it ain't the French making money at this con.
 

snorri

Legendary Member
Because the EU is the embodiment of administrative perfection?
Aye, right. ;)
Nothing to do with administrative perfection.
Many of the EU rules scorned by the present Westminster government protected the employment rights of workers from exploitation by unscrupulous employers. Not a matter that would concern many Tory MPs but important for the less well off in UK society.

Edit Unkraut clearly has first hand experience!
 
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Unkraut

Master of the Inane Comment
Location
Germany
Edit Unkraut clearly has first hand experience!
The intention was not to cause you to get the Kleenex out to wipe away the tears. ^_^

It was a no brainer though to leave the country for a job which did have job security - even if in the end after I left it the company did fold. An American company bought it, it wasn't making enough profit so they closed it down.

You don't get the best out of a workforce by treating them badly, and even if Brexit ends up offering some trading advantages, a demoralised staff on naff conditions ("flexible, lean and competitive") may well not have the productivity to make proper use of such advantages.
 

Kajjal

Veteran
Location
Wheely World
The intention was not to cause you to get the Kleenex out to wipe away the tears. ^_^

It was a no brainer though to leave the country for a job which did have job security - even if in the end after I left it the company did fold. An American company bought it, it wasn't making enough profit so they closed it down.

You don't get the best out of a workforce by treating them badly, and even if Brexit ends up offering some trading advantages, a demoralised staff on naff conditions ("flexible, lean and competitive") may well not have the productivity to make proper use of such advantages.
This is similar to my experience. Having worked for US companies the UK is very similar in approach. It is a work them hard while paying as little as possible approach, the NHS workers also highlight this with being given a 1% pay rise and not even a bonus for their hard work and sacrifice. Having also worked for European companies the culture and approach is very different with the workforce being much better treated and far more productive.
 

deptfordmarmoset

Full time tea drinker
Location
Armonmy Way
Another change, forbidden under EU rules, that was doing the rounds was preferential beer tariffs in pubs i.e. cutting or even abolishing the duty on beer that is sold in pubs whilst increasing it on beer sold in supermarkets. Revenue neutral whilst saving our pubs. :okay:
If the government wanted to reduce the cost of a pint of beer, it could have removed the Beer Duty (just under 11p per % of a pint, e.g. a pint of 5% beer would be 54p cheaper [as at 2018]). I know of no reason why shop-sold beer could not have a higher rate of Beer Duty. Perhaps that would give rise to claims of unfair and discriminatory pricing against off-sales. That possibility would apply equally with a VAT reduction.

But the government continued levying the duty when it could have dropped it or reduced it. I wonder why.
 

JBGooner

Über Member
If the government wanted to reduce the cost of a pint of beer, it could have removed the Beer Duty (just under 11p per % of a pint, e.g. a pint of 5% beer would be 54p cheaper [as at 2018]). I know of no reason why shop-sold beer could not have a higher rate of Beer Duty. Perhaps that would give rise to claims of unfair and discriminatory pricing against off-sales. That possibility would apply equally with a VAT reduction.

But the government continued levying the duty when it could have dropped it or reduced it. I wonder why.
Well I expect HMRC didn't want to see a drop in its intake.
Alcohol Structures Directives (92/83/EEC and 92/84/EEC) was apparently why the UK couldn't differentiate between the duty on beer for pubs and the duty on beer for shops.
 

deptfordmarmoset

Full time tea drinker
Location
Armonmy Way
Well I expect HMRC didn't want to see a drop in its intake.
Alcohol Structures Directives (92/83/EEC and 92/84/EEC) was apparently why the UK couldn't differentiate between the duty on beer for pubs and the duty on beer for shops.
Exactly, the UK wanted the money. Germany and Spain manage to levy the equivalent of 5p per 5% pint while the UK takes 54p. And apparently seeks to blame the EU for it all....
 
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