The push to return to the office....

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Should the govt. really be pushing people back into the commuting rat-race? I appreciate it’s having an impact on city centre economies, but maybe it’s boosting local economies instead?
Less commuting means less investment required in transport infrastructure. Central city office space could be turned back into housing as offices will be able to downsize. The economy will rebalance from a city-centralised to localised with more opportunity for cycle/walking and local busses vs. the car.
Once again the Tories seem out of step....unless protecting their donors in office construction and rental...

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...-offices-amid-pandemic?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other
 
Why?
When a lot of people and businesses are finding that they can work just as effectively from home . There is no more hassle of having to commute long distances by car train or bus. No congestion, parking , season tickets or fuel costs . There is also less risk of coming into contact with anyone who may have the virus .
The raising of train fares hasn't really encouraged people back .
 

Bonefish Blues

Banging donk
Location
52 Festive Road
Should the govt. really be pushing people back into the commuting rat-race? I appreciate it’s having an impact on city centre economies, but maybe it’s boosting local economies instead?
Less commuting means less investment required in transport infrastructure. Central city office space could be turned back into housing as offices will be able to downsize. The economy will rebalance from a city-centralised to localised with more opportunity for cycle/walking and local busses vs. the car.
Once again the Tories seem out of step....unless protecting their donors in office construction and rental...

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...-offices-amid-pandemic?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other
Because cities and towns are dying on their arses at the moment, and nobody has the slightest idea what the longer-term implications of this are, except that they are economically serious.
 

DCLane

Found in the Yorkshire hills ...
It's the panic of large office spaces being empty, less petrol/diesel revenue from reduced commuting, small/large cafe's/snack bars/restaurants losing business, loss of 'business' clothing sales, etc.

Cities have, and will, re-invent themselves. We'll find a new way of operating which probably includes some home-working and some office time.

The benefits will be less road use = less investment needed. Also greater leisure time from those who would have been commuting*

* My commute was by bike 90% of the time so ironically my mileage and fitness has plummeted.
 

Bonefish Blues

Banging donk
Location
52 Festive Road
It's the panic of large office spaces being empty, less petrol/diesel revenue from reduced commuting, small/large cafe's/snack bars/restaurants losing business, loss of 'business' clothing sales, etc.

Cities have, and will, re-invent themselves. We'll find a new way of operating which probably includes some home-working and some office time.
I'm sure we will, but it's the how and how soon that's causing alarum.
 

glasgowcyclist

Charming but somewhat feckless
Location
Scotland
I still have that very phone. (Nokia 6310i if I'm not mistaken, with infra-red and everything! Ackcherly I have about five of them.)
 

Beebo

Firm and Fruity
Location
Hexleybeef
Because cities and towns are dying on their arses at the moment, and nobody has the slightest idea what the longer-term implications of this are, except that they are economically serious.
This^
Take London as an example.
The City has huge buildings with enormous rents. The Docklands area is the same. There is a whole infrastructure grown up around them. Plus our pension funds have invested in commercial property.
If no one returns to work then TFL will have to cut jobs. The current network isn’t viable at low levels of passengers.
Maybe this will be London’s version of the coal mines closing.
 
OP
Fab Foodie

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Because cities and towns are dying on their arses at the moment, and nobody has the slightest idea what the longer-term implications of this are, except that they are economically serious.
The High Street has been in decline for ages and that's as a result of online sales that has certainly been accelerated by CV19 - so they definitely have to change regardless.
Basing an economy on tens of thousands of people moving in and out of city centres and 'business districts' like the tides is also madness - that has to change too.
There will be short-term pain, but the longer-terms gains might be significant. Repopulate city centres (as a place where people live) and they will thrive again but as far nicer places.
 
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Bonefish Blues

Banging donk
Location
52 Festive Road
The High Street has been in decline for ages and that's as a result of online sales that has certainly been accelerated by CV19 - so they definitely have to change regardless.
Basing an economy on tens of thousands of people moving in and out of city centres and 'business districts' like the tides is also madness - that has to change too.
There will be short-term pain, but the longer-terms gains might be significant. Repopulate city centres (as a place where people live) and they will thrive again but as far nicer places.
Indeed, but it's the cliff-edge nature of the decline that's scary.
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
Repopulate city centres (as a place where people live) and they will thrive again but as far nicer places.
Some city centres have been repopulated, around here the number of people living centrally has surged hugely in recent years.

Not sure where the nicer bit comes from. This tends to create a certain level of gentrification but one which needs office workers AND residents to sustain. A district around here if you analyse businesses going out of business is way more precarious than what bullish outsiders who proclaim it's brilliant proclaim.

Will the transport system outside of SE England become 3rd world with lack of numbers and investment?
 

screenman

Legendary Member
Maybe reducing overheads by removing the need for high rental offices will allow some companies to continue or hopefully even grow. In a past life I owned a business that used to take 25 days a month on average to pay costs and the other 5 were my wages/profit, one thing I decided when I sold that was to create another business with very low overheads as this created a less stressful life.
 
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