The UK should become a Republic

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
I suspect the attitude to the Queen of most Australians is typified by the remarks of that Aussie newscaster when he commented on Meghan.

As good a character assassination as you are likely to hear.

A few anti-monarchy protesters usually turn up for royal visits down under, but they are only there to amuse the crowd prior to the arrival of the main attraction.
 
Ah. OK. Didn't know that, thanks. So what's this got to do with our head of state - you're not suggesting that Liz does this personally?
Many years ago I used to be a visiting officer for the DHSS. This included doing home visits a couple of months before a pensioner's 100th birthday to confirm that they were actually still alive and wanted Liz to send them a telegram.

The hardest part was explaining why I had to visit.
Most seemed to think the queen just knew when everyone's birthday was and would just pop down to the post office to send a telegram on the right day.
 

Yellow Fang

Legendary Member
Location
Reading
I reckon we are a republic in all but name. The Supreme Court countermanded BoJo's prorogation of parliament using the Royal Prerogative, that means the Queen is not the source of constitutional authority, which was a political fiction anyway. Alright, the Supreme Court ruled BoJo's advice to the Queen was illegal, but her ink did not fade off the paper when they decided that.
 
I reckon we are a republic in all but name. The Supreme Court countermanded BoJo's prorogation of parliament using the Royal Prerogative, that means the Queen is not the source of constitutional authority, which was a political fiction anyway. Alright, the Supreme Court ruled BoJo's advice to the Queen was illegal, but her ink did not fade off the paper when they decided that.
Hmm, in that case it's probably about time to respectfully replace the rather expensive institution then, if it's basically taking up space in a big building.

We have [Edit: "Germany has"] a constitutional court that is separate to the head of state, but we still have a head of state. In our case the court makes a decision on a federal law first and then it goes on to the President as the last step, but they act separately.

I think part of the problem the UK has is that the constitution, such as it is, isn't written down anywhere. This means effectively a politician with a majority in the commons can make things up as they go along.
 
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Hmm, in that case it's probably about time to respectfully replace the rather expensive institution then, if it's basically taking up space in a big building.

We have a constitutional court that is separate to the head of state, but we still have a head of state. In our case the court makes a decision on a federal law first and then it goes on to the President as the last step, but they act separately.

I think part of the problem the UK has is that the constitution, such as it is, isn't written down anywhere. This means effectively a politician with a majority in the commons can make things up as they go along.
A written constitution is only as good as the paper it's written on :rolleyes:
 
OP
R

roubaixtuesday

Veteran
A written constitution is only as good as the paper it's written on :rolleyes:
Vellum m'boy, vellum.

Mere paper being a sad, vegan substitute for the proper repository of monarchial wisdom, and fit only for rectal cleansing.
 

Dave Davenport

Legendary Member
Location
Hampshire
Or finest parchment hand written and illuminated by monks (now waiting for someone to enlighten me (see what I did there) that illuminated manuscripts were always done on vellum)).
(and someone else to point out I got the comma rule thing wrong)))))).
 
A written constitution is only as good as the paper it's written on :rolleyes:
It's a bit more than that: written correctly it not only lays down a set of rules for a government, but also builds up the institutions to protect it, so a government can't change it without the other institutions agreeing: this is deliberately difficult in the case of the German one, where making a law requires the agreement of five different independent government institutions which derive power from different sources.
Of course, you could just have a coup or a revolution, but short of that, a government has to deal with significant obstacles to try the sort of shenanigans the UK has seen in the last few years, and ignoring the constitution is otherwise impossible because you'd have to get laws past four different institutions, including the constitutional court, and then get it agreed to by the states.
 
Vellum m'boy, vellum.
Mere paper being a sad, vegan substitute for the proper repository of monarchial wisdom, and fit only for rectal cleansing.
Or finest parchment hand written and illuminated by monks (now waiting for someone to enlighten me (see what I did there) that illuminated manuscripts were always done on vellum)).
(and someone else to point out I got the comma rule thing wrong)))))).
The German one is a book.
Well, it would be, it's German...
Yesterday's technology. The new British constitution will be on Non-Fungible Tokens
 
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