UK EU trade deal ratification

What will the European parliament do?

  • Ratify the deal

    Votes: 16 38.1%
  • Reject the deal

    Votes: 3 7.1%
  • Postpone ratification to a later date

    Votes: 12 28.6%
  • Suspend the deal

    Votes: 1 2.4%
  • Amend the deal

    Votes: 3 7.1%
  • Something else

    Votes: 7 16.7%

  • Total voters
    42
  • Poll closed .
your continued instance that all remainers are clear, right thinking individuals and all Brexiteers are stupid and wrong,
Again, this is projection. It is your view, not mine.

My view, FWIW was cleary (I hope) expressed here

the current govt sees continuing antagonism to the EU as central to its identity and electoral appeal.

Entirely fantastical and false stories are built to continue this narrative.

https://www.cyclechat.net/threads/uk-eu-trade-deal-ratification.274169/post-6395510


That rather than debate what I have said, you invent opinions I do not, and have never held, reflects how weak your position is.

Which is also most likely why you make completely false statements such as many of the oh so confidently predicted trade difficulties failed to materialise, and many of those that did were ironed out in a couple of months.
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
Which is also most likely why you make completely false statements such as many of the oh so confidently predicted trade difficulties failed to materialise, and many of those that did were ironed out in a couple of months.
Many of the difficulties were ironed out, which is why the avalanche of Brexit is shite stories slowed to a trickle, and trade with Europe bounced back significantly from February onwards.

I know those facts don't suit your pre-determined view, but I can't help that.
 
Many of the difficulties were ironed out, which is why the avalanche of Brexit is shite stories slowed to a trickle, and trade with Europe bounced back significantly from February onwards.

I know those facts don't suit your pre-determined view, but I can't help that.
They are not facts, quite the opposite - and I have posted facts which directly contradict them. You have posted nothing but your personal opinion.

Why you can't accept reality, is an issue for you.
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
They are not facts, quite the opposite - and I have posted facts which directly contradict them. You have posted nothing but your personal opinion.

Why you can't accept reality, is an issue for you.
The trade recovery is factual, and the Bank of England's growth forecast is about as reliable as any economic forecast could be.

The reality is Brexit has not been the disaster so many remainers so confidently predicted.

Deny it all you like, but carry on doing so will make you look increasingly divorced from reality.
 
You wouldn't. He actually likes the UK.
Pointing out problems with the course a country is following do not imply dislike. Please don't make assumptions about my feelings towards the UK.

As to the rest, I'm not sure what the Brexit Supporters are complaining about. The UK wanted to leave. Many people explained what the consequences would be, but Brexit "won", and you are now out of the EU.

We are now seeing the consequences you were told about. As the Brexit promises were for major new trade deals and 350 million pounds a week for the NHS, and much more besides, it appears to have fallen short by a long way.

I'm not denying that Mr Rinaldi has qualifications. He's also a member of a right wing populist party, and the opinions of all populist politicians need to be viewed with extreme caution.

Populists may appear to be on "your" side. They rarely are, although you may find yourself facing the same way.
 
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It is the mindset that is the key, Ireland as an example is an outward looking positive country even given its recent past history and benefits greatly from this. The UK is frequently held back by a belief in being exceptional without actually putting in the hard work to achieve it. An example of this is the UK’s fall industrially over decades to the 1970’s due to believing it was the best rather than actually competing hard to be the best. This mindset led to the UK recently imposing significant trade sanctions on its self.
This sums it up well.

I think this also lead to the UK never really understanding the EU, it's goals and the way it grew out of the history of Europe, leading to this idea tha it somehow began as a "trade agreement" and somehow became the EU by some kind of bait and switch, when the history of the EU has followed a common theme throughout of working more closely to promote peace.

It is ironic that the UK has unwittingly provided an example of this now in Northern Ireland.
 
The trade recovery is factual, and the Bank of England's growth forecast is about as reliable as any economic forecast could be.

The reality is Brexit has not been the disaster so many remainers so confidently predicted.

Deny it all you like, but carry on doing so will make you look increasingly divorced from reality.
Bizarre. And remarkable.
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
Bizarre. And remarkable.
Don't worry about it, there's no shame when a prediction doesn't come to pass, after all it's only something you think would likely happen.

It's almost inevitable I will owe you a jam sandwich in a couple of months, and there's another one I always quote in these circumstances.

When Roman Abramovich was set to take over Chelsea, I confidently predicted he would turn out to be another of those dodgy businessmen trying to get into football, but whose cheques would bounce when it came to it.

Look how that one turned out.

Not only has he lavishly financed Chelsea, but he has also provided years of financial stability for the club, and looks set to continue doing so for years to come.
 
Many of the difficulties were ironed out.......
I'm sorry, I appear to have missed the "ironing out" of the Northern Ireland Protocol?

The incompatibility of the border on the island of Ireland with Brexit was predicted before the referendum. It is still with us.
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
I'm sorry, I appear to have missed the "ironing out" of the Northern Ireland Protocol?
You are not sorry, and of course you know fine well you haven't missed anything.

Which is why I said 'many' and not 'all'.

Given that the Irish question has baffled, bemused, and beaten every Prime Minister since Gladstone, I'm not expecting a solution anytime soon.

Others may be more optimistic.

As is the 40 (forty!) Percent reduction in food exports, but according to Paley, that doesn't exist either...
Paley is not saying the food export reduction does not exist.

But at the risk of losing another jam sandwich, I predict that's another economic indicator which will head in the recovery direction.

If it doesn't, it will become the new normal and British business will adapt to it, just as it always does.

As will European business on the other side, but I'm not so bothered about them.
 
As is the 40 (forty!) Percent reduction in food exports, but according to Paley, that doesn't exist either...
In all fairness, it is still very early to be claiming success or disaster based on statistics, especially during a global pandemic.

A deal agreed at the end of one year to commence the next is always going to lead to negative consequences. Similarly, there will be so many unforseen issues that will crop up that any trend (positive or negative) probably shouldn't be trusted.

There are far bigger issues at play than a month on month, quarter on quarter analysis.
 

Rocky

sacré bleu
You are not sorry, and of course you know fine well you haven't missed anything.

Which is why I said 'many' and not 'all'.

Given that the Irish question has baffled, bemused, and beaten every Prime Minister since Gladstone, I'm not expecting a solution anytime soon.

Others may be more optimistic.



Paley is not saying the food export reduction does not exist.

But at the risk of losing another jam sandwich, I predict that's another economic indicator which will head in the recovery direction.

If it doesn't, it will become the new normal and British business will adapt to it, just as it always does.

As will European business on the other side, but I'm not so bothered about them.
How is the visa thingy going? I see that our musicians and touring artists are pretty upset about the bureaucracy needed to tour in Europe.
 

stowie

Legendary Member
How does that work considering he is Italian?

I think his perspective is more that because of the crap deal the EU negotiated, Italy is going to lose unnecesarily.
1) How does his nationality affect the validity of the argument?
2) Italy was in danger of losing more than other EU nations. The deal struck mitigates this although any cannot replicate the previous trading relationship.
3) Moving from a highly integrated trading relationship to a FTA will incur friction. The UK government decided that it valued other aspects of Brexit over maintaining this highly integrated trading relationship. Otherwise we could have moved to an EFTA type arrangement. Having cake and eating it is not an option in the real world.

It may surprise you that I don't wholly disagree with the prof on the EU. There will always be a tension between collective harmonisation and agility against national sovereignty. Valid arguments can be made as to where that line should be drawn and clearly there are as many opinions on this as member states in the EU. What isn't valid is the belief that there is a magic formula where every country can do exactly what they want without any consequences but yet still retain the highly integrated trade environment.
 

Unkraut

Master of the Inane Comment
Location
Germany
"The UK humiliated us on this issue. I learned that the European Union has sued the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca. [Rinaldi]
I don't blame them. Reducing expected deliveries from 120 million to 31 million doses is extreme to say the least.

The general opinion here about the vaccination programme carried out in the UK is admiration for having got on with it. Fair enough. I have to say though I am getting fed up with British pride about this in view of the fact nearly one-third of doses injected in the UK came from the territory of the EU, and that the UK, like the USA, has concentrated on solely injecting its own population and unlike the EU not exported to the rest of the world. I don't know if this has changed recently, but it isn't something to be proud about.

The EU, that is the member states, actually acted fairly quickly on vaccine procurement considering all 27 had to agree, and some of the poorer eastern countries had legitimate concerns about financing the campaign which held things up. It probably could and should have been dealt with more quickly, but the principle of sharing the limited amounts of vaccine available, especially at the beginning, is more noble than any one rich country buying up and hogging the supplies for itself.

The meeting was in Turkey, between the EU and Turkey. There were two chairs - one for the head of state of Turkey, and one for the head of state of the EU.
Although it has some of the trappings of a state, the EU is not a unitary state, and doesn't have a government. There is no head of state for the EU. The ability of its unelected bureaucrats, based in Brussels, to initiate and implement legislation is, I believe, non-existent.

I wonder which will come first: people stop viewing the EU like this, or the last episode of The Archers. ^_^
 
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