Winter bike vs Winter wheels vs ???

SamN01

Well-Known Member
Location
Cambridge
I recently bought a carbon road bike which I love, I have just bought some carbon clinchers to hopefully race next year but currently if there is any rain in the air or on the ground I am not riding the bike. I have also not stuck a load of lights on the bike.

I am considering buying a cheaper bike as a 'winter' trainer. Something I can stick a load of lights on and ride even when conditions arent great. Does that sound sensible or should I just man up and get out in the rain on my carbon bike (which some lights added to ride in fading light!)
 

alecstilleyedye

nothing in moderation
Moderator
get a winter bike, maybe a cheap steel framed bike from ebay which can take mudguards and put cheap wheels on it (or at least cheap rims built up with decent hubs).
 

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
get a winter bike, maybe a cheap steel framed bike from ebay which can take mudguards and put cheap wheels on it (or at least cheap rims built up with decent hubs).
Agreed, a winter bike is a good investment.
A winter fixie is good too, that's what I did in my London cycle-commute days, fixed for winter, shiny geary bits for Summer.
Also get slightly fatter tyres on the winter bike... bit more grip but also offer a bit more resilience to potholes unseen in the dark!

The final benefit is when you change from your winter hack to the carbon best-bike... it'll feel like it's made of Gossamer!
 

TheDoctor

Europe Endless
Moderator
Location
Stevenage
You're far more likely to stack a bike when it's dark and slippery. Scuffing up a steel frame is no big deal, but trashing a grands worth of carbon might be.
 

battered

Guru
I favour the winter bike approach. My year round bike is a 15 yr old MTB, it's great. I ride it all over and don't have to worry when I park it, it's still a decent ride and it's a handy way of trickling down older components. I run it out of the bits box with wheels and pedals that mates have discarded. As others have said, if you drop it you don't cry, whereas it might not be the same tale if your lovely Ultegra kit got covered in salt, the ally pitted and the lacquer started peeling.

Good idea to fit broader tyres in winter, it gives you a bit more spring when you hit some bomb crater you hadn't seen in the dark.

It pays to be a fan of the oily side of life if you run an older bike as everyday wheels, it's surprising how often things need fettling.
 

Rob3rt

Man or Moose!
Location
Manchester
Winter fixed for definate.

In the dark and rain sometimes potholes arent visible or look like water on the road, then you hit them and learn otherwise. Wouldnt enjoy the elevated risk of totalling on your pride and joy whether it be steel, alu, carbon on ti. A cheap hack will leave you to enjoy your ride much more, rather than constantly worrying about the chance of a crash and the amount of damage incurred.
 

swee'pea99

Legendary Member
I've never really seen the point of spending half the year on half the bike. Then again, it depends how and where you ride. Almost all of my riding is the daily commute, so I'm not worried about hitting potholes in the dark and wet - I know every one on my route. If I varied my routes more, I suppose I might feel differently. But no - I ride my #1 bike all year round. 
 

alecstilleyedye

nothing in moderation
Moderator
Why dont people use carbon bikes in winter? If I buy a bike for 2 grand I expect it to work all year!
i do see your point. when i first started off with my £250 carrera virtuoso i has quite happy to ride it all year around and similarly did not get the whole deal about having more than one bike.

however, once i upgraded the components, particularly the wheels, i found that having a spare groupset and other bits lying around was good enough reason to get a good steel frame to put them on for winter. certainly you rarely see club riders on the same bike in july that they were riding in january.

the way to think about it is thus: if i could afford a ferrari, would i drive it in all weathers getting it scratched, chipped and requiring more frequent servicing, or would i also keep something more practical and mundane for everyday and keep the ferrari for weekends.

the analogy to bikes; therefore; is don't buy a fancy race bike and expect it to last very well with all year round use. far better to get a runabout for when conditions are poor or you're commuting to work etc.
 

jayonabike

Powered by caffeine & whisky
Location
Hertfordshire
As a second bike what about a cyclo cross bike like the Specialized Tricross, can take fatter tyres, mudguards and a rack if you need it. I'm thinking of getting one of these as my winter bike.
 

vorsprung

Veteran
Location
Devon
I have 3 bikes

A Ti wunder bike that I use for events and weekends. It's too expensive to leave locked up while I do the shopping
A all year round hub geared bike with full mudguards and tyres that weight about a ton. This is the main commute bike
An Orbea Aluminium framed racing bike. This is for summer commuting, bit of training. At a push it can substitute for the other two bikes

My advice would be get a heavy cheap bike to ride in the winter. Don't grind your gears to paste in the mud and wet
 

shrew

New Member
Location
St Neots , Cambs
I spent 2k on a bike this summer and damn right am i riding it all year around, would you buy a porshe for the summer and drive a robin reliant in the winter? no no no (in my opinion).

i could be dead in a year, enjoy the now, enjoy your bike and just maintain it more regularly over the winter, clean the salt and muck of as regular as possible, cleaning the bike front to back every week is a must.

a nice bike is a joy but dont be afraid to use it )
 

DavieB

MIA
Location
Glasgow
i do see your point. when i first started off with my £250 carrera virtuoso i has quite happy to ride it all year around and similarly did not get the whole deal about having more than one bike.

however, once i upgraded the components, particularly the wheels, i found that having a spare groupset and other bits lying around was good enough reason to get a good steel frame to put them on for winter. certainly you rarely see club riders on the same bike in july that they were riding in january.

the way to think about it is thus: if i could afford a ferrari, would i drive it in all weathers getting it scratched, chipped and requiring more frequent servicing, or would i also keep something more practical and mundane for everyday and keep the ferrari for weekends.

the analogy to bikes; therefore; is don't buy a fancy race bike and expect it to last very well with all year round use. far better to get a runabout for when conditions are poor or you're commuting to work etc.


I do get that, but if I had a ferrari I would have an Audi RS6 for pottering about in..... So when I get my new bike about a grands worth, I dont want to be jumping about on my Virtuoso it will be given to my dad lol. If it snows I may use my MTB
 

cyberknight

As long as I breathe, I attack.
I do not have a 2 k bike just a virtuosso but to me its my best bike and i was loathe to put a rack on it but i like to use it as much as possible.

For winter i use my subway 1 (slicked) and find it great for commuting in the dodgier weather.I am really considering looking out for a cheap roadiy off ebay to use as a winter bike but truth be told i am happy enough with what i have atm.
 
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