Young, mega-rich - and demanding to pay more tax

Slick

Veteran
It would probably make more difference if they and others just paid what they are due without all the gymnastics.
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
Interesting slant on addressing financial inequality:
It is interesting, as in american history there is the chequered history of philanthropy on a large scale, on occasions, often local in nature.

But it also goes against the trickle down narrative in America which is so incredibly persuasive. What? You want to pay more tax? But if you have millions in your pocket it'll trickle down, whereas if you give it to the government they'll spend it on donkey sanctuaries.
 
OP
SpokeyDokey

SpokeyDokey

Into my 64th
Moderator
It is interesting, as in american history there is the chequered history of philanthropy on a large scale, on occasions, often local in nature.

But it also goes against the trickle down narrative in America which is so incredibly persuasive. What? You want to pay more tax? But if you have millions in your pocket it'll trickle down, whereas if you give it to the government they'll spend it on donkey sanctuaries.
Based on my conversations with some wealthy friends and acquaintances some of the resistance to paying more taxes is the pessimism surrounding what exactly Gov' would do with do with the increased revenues.

A system of transient Governments and Houdini-esque accountability on the part of individual Government members does nothing to enhance confidence that what is raised is directed at issues that really matter to the populace.

I think many people would happily fund a percent or two on the sacred cow of Basic Tax Rate for the beleaguered NHS if it could be demonstrated that it would not be frittered away instead of reaching the areas of critical need.

Same probably applies to any suggestions of increases in tax take from the wealthy - maybe there is scope for a Gov' sponsored campaign along these lines that targets this section of society.
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
Based on my conversations with some wealthy friends and acquaintances some of the resistance to paying more taxes is the pessimism surrounding what exactly Gov' would do with do with the increased revenues.
America or here? America isn't the only country with the culture talked about, some European countries also have this culture, even western european ones e.g. Italy.

The NHS the national insurance contributions have been raised/tweaked a fair bit the last 20 years. It is of course not enough for the NHS.

Alain de Botton and the inland revenue and I hear other areas like nudge economics are interested in what you can do to change attitudes towards tax. Whether changing the language used on forms, basic facts that (nearly everyone can agree with) what tax is used for. Some other ideas along those lines of hypothecated tax.

The current worry I have in the UK is that the US has a culture of filing tax returns and I've often wondered if that is some part of attitudes. The UK has been over the years been drifting towards more and more self assessement and with fiscal drag higher rate tax payers increasing. There seems to me to be a bit of acrimony and attitude problem about tax when people are sucked into the higher tax and filling in more forms.

As we were talking about the US, there's interesting differences in tax rates. As others have said in the US people have said that a large proportion of the population believe that $250,000 higher rates is about right suggesting that many aspire to earn this. In the UK the higher tax rate is pegged at about a quarter of that.
 
OP
SpokeyDokey

SpokeyDokey

Into my 64th
Moderator
America or here? America isn't the only country with the culture talked about, some European countries also have this culture, even western european ones e.g. Italy.

The NHS the national insurance contributions have been raised/tweaked a fair bit the last 20 years. It is of course not enough for the NHS.

Alain de Botton and the inland revenue and I hear other areas like nudge economics are interested in what you can do to change attitudes towards tax. Whether changing the language used on forms, basic facts that (nearly everyone can agree with) what tax is used for. Some other ideas along those lines of hypothecated tax.

The current worry I have in the UK is that the US has a culture of filing tax returns and I've often wondered if that is some part of attitudes. The UK has been over the years been drifting towards more and more self assessement and with fiscal drag higher rate tax payers increasing. There seems to me to be a bit of acrimony and attitude problem about tax when people are sucked into the higher tax and filling in more forms.

As we were talking about the US, there's interesting differences in tax rates. As others have said in the US people have said that a large proportion of the population believe that $250,000 higher rates is about right suggesting that many aspire to earn this. In the UK the higher tax rate is pegged at about a quarter of that.
Here - to answer your question.

Bolded para' - sometimes all it takes is to adopt simple solutions such as changing language & tone. I'll look up A d B.
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
Here - to answer your question.

Bolded para' - sometimes all it takes is to adopt simple solutions such as changing language & tone. I'll look up A d B.
He's just an every day philosopher. I don't think stuff he's said is seriously meated out, just the idea has been expressed over a number of years in print, on guest appearances on things like this week, news etc. I gather nudge/freakonomics type books may have something, but I don't know, not read them.

A lot of his stuff (except his appearances on his popular youtube channel which I'm not even sure if people realise he does voice overs for) is out of fashion, subsumed by Psychology. I always thought if you worried about certain things/had an interest in certain things you did a Philosophy or Theology degree, apparently I keep on getting told you do a Psychology degree now :smile:.
 

Unkraut

Master of the Inane Comment
Location
Germany
Based on my conversations with some wealthy friends and acquaintances some of the resistance to paying more taxes is the pessimism surrounding what exactly Gov' would do with do with the increased revenues.
My dad used to say this (and was not stinking rich). 'I wouldn't mind so much if they didn't waste so much of it'. That was after his hard-earned reddies were being taxed for the third or fourth time.

many people would happily fund a percent or two on the sacred cow of Basic Tax Rate for the beleaguered NHS if it could be demonstrated that it would not be frittered away ...
The tome I read on Blair's govt obviously had a section on the NHS. I remember the part describing how Blair repealed some Tory legislation on ideological grounds, only to find that in reality it had actually helped make the system a bit more efficient, after which they reintroduced their own similar reforms, but bearing a different name. You wonder just how much this to-ing and fro-ing costs. They also injected more money, but the increase in performance did not match the extra cash. So whilst I am sure the current lot have and are ensuring the NHS is strapped for cash, just increasing the budget will not of itself deal with its weaknesses.
 

Diogenes

brr, summer's over
My dad used to say this (and was not stinking rich). 'I wouldn't mind so much if they didn't waste so much of it'. That was after his hard-earned reddies were being taxed for the third or fourth time.



The tome I read on Blair's govt obviously had a section on the NHS. I remember the part describing how Blair repealed some Tory legislation on ideological grounds, only to find that in reality it had actually helped make the system a bit more efficient, after which they reintroduced their own similar reforms, but bearing a different name. You wonder just how much this to-ing and fro-ing costs. They also injected more money, but the increase in performance did not match the extra cash. So whilst I am sure the current lot have and are ensuring the NHS is strapped for cash, just increasing the budget will not of itself deal with its weaknesses.

Obviously this is anecdotal and only one hospital but my wife spent a lot of time at Kilmarnock's Crosshouse hospital in 1999/2000-01. That was when Labour significantly increased NHS spending. Crosshouse renovated the reception areas with new floors, carpets, seating, paintwork - all very, very nice and quite plush. They also installed carpets in some wards - despite warnings about increased infection risks. When they started having problems with increased infections, they "deep-cleaned" the wards, ripped out the carpets and put new ones down. One ward was done three times in 8 months.

All through this, nurses had to share one pair of scissors on the ward and families were coming in to clean the single patient rooms because of a lack of cleaners.

Again - only one hospital and anecdotal, but some of the decisions made on spending were highly questionable.
 
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