Obesity

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Palm oil very often is in ready meals - not something one sees in home-made food ...
Not unless you live in Malaysia....
Many products need a source of hard fats, in the veg world there's only Palm, Coconut and Cocoa now that Hydrogenation is frowned-upon.
Animal fats are great, suet, butter, lard, dripping but there are issues with 'acceptability' in some parts of the population. Animal fats are also more expensive and with less stable supply chains for industrial use.
Almost all of my customers have removed Palm Oil from their products, the last few still have some tech issues to resolve.
 

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
You'd be bloody crucified...

I got taught this by a Chinese lady I know. It really does make the difference in the taste.
As they tend to be already partially degraded, they also fry much better* than veg oils (which straight from the bottle are mostly crap)...don't get me started on frying with Olive oil....

*More polar in nature which increases their heat-transfer at the surface of the foodstuff....
 

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Is that because it doesn't do so well at high temperatures ? We use olive oil most of the time, and occasionally coconut oil for stir fry/oriental meals.
Mostly....
If you want to brown stuff or quick-fry it's very poor. Also, it smokes and produces off-flavours at high temperatures. In which case use Rapeseed as it's cheaper and works much better.
If you have to use Olive oil for browning (as it's all you have), a knob of butter added to it works wonders.... I sometimes low-slow sauté leeks this way as all butter is a bit much! Browning mince for example is OK as the beef fat helps, but again I don't see the point of using Olive oil when Rapeseed is cheaper (OK, for a more 'authentic' Italian' experience maybe...).
I would only use Olive oil if you are frying at very low temps i.e. gently sautéing garlic for pasta aoli where the flavour from the olive oil is also preserved.
 

battered

Guru
35p soup... Thick, gloppy and woefully underseasoned. Forget it. The branded stuff is no better.

I'd much rather spend the time prepping veggies and making my own. What you seem to be conveniently forgetting is that the act of preparing and cooking food can be a pleasure in itself.
I'm not forgetting it for an instant. That's why I stood at the cooker for an hour doing it. However I can understand plenty of people not wanting to bother.
I cannot agree that tinned soup is any where near as good as home made
I also would likely get sick of chopping vegetables for a FULL hour as its usually a couple minutes max to chop a few veggies up fir family pot of soup ...and I'm slow at chopping

A FULL hour is an awful lot of veggies
I never said tinned was as good as home made. An hour is the time it took me to turn half a swede, most of a bag of carrots, a head of celery, 2 onions, into 1cm dice and get it in a pan. I think my knife skills are reasonable, but it took an hour. It is a big pan of soup. Most people don't want to do this.
I promise you, the solution to the obesity epidemic is not 'convince people to spend an hour chopping vegetables in order to replicate a 35p tin of soup'.
I didn't say it was, so the quote marks are inappropriate.
you are still talking about processed and ultra processed food though.
Which isn't good for folk - it needs to be eaten as a guilty treat, not as a daily diet.
The "low fat" thing did of course allow the ultra processed food industry to sell a lot of "low fat" stuff at premium prices that was loaded with other stuff - sugar and sweeteners etc.

Am reading this at the moment

View: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Spoon-Fed-almost-everything-about-wrong/dp/1787332292/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=spoon+fed&qid=1623302249&sr=8-1

Not that far in but he has already pointed the finger several times at the food industry for global dietary ills and health issues.
He points to their incredible economic power and their ability, nay keenness, to influence popular perceptions.
And highlights their sponsorship of research - much of which ends up serving their business needs.
May quote from it later.
Of course I am talking about manufactured foods. Natural foods, by their very nature, do not come in low fat/high fat variants. You can't generate a high fat carrot, or a high sugar carrot.
The food manufacturing industry manufactures what people want to eat. Just like bike manufacturers make what people want to ride. Of course they will try to present their products in as attractive a light as possible. They will also sponsor research that supports their business aims. Well, obviously. Bike manufacturers don't sponsor research into increasing car use, do they?
 

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
I'm not forgetting it for an instant. That's why I stood at the cooker for an hour doing it. However I can understand plenty of people not wanting to bother.

I never said tinned was as good as home made. An hour is the time it took me to turn half a swede, most of a bag of carrots, a head of celery, 2 onions, into 1cm dice and get it in a pan. I think my knife skills are reasonable, but it took an hour. It is a big pan of soup. Most people don't want to do this.
I didn't say it was, so the quote marks are inappropriate.

Of course I am talking about manufactured foods. Natural foods, by their very nature, do not come in low fat/high fat variants. You can't generate a high fat carrot, or a high sugar carrot.
The food manufacturing industry manufactures what people want to eat. Just like bike manufacturers make what people want to ride. Of course they will try to present their products in as attractive a light as possible. They will also sponsor research that supports their business aims. Well, obviously. Bike manufacturers don't sponsor research into increasing car use, do they?
Just to be picky.here but they do breed higher sugar carrots..

And all manner of other vegetable variants.

But overall yes, still a lot more 'natural' than many of the 'food type products' that are passed off as suitable components of a decent diet .

And
 

KnittyNorah

Well-Known Member
Of course I am talking about manufactured foods. Natural foods, by their very nature, do not come in low fat/high fat variants. You can't generate a high fat carrot, or a high sugar carrot.
Oh yes they do, and oh yes you can!
A natural vegetable, for instance from millennia ago, would be scarcely recognisable as such either by taste or appearance nowadays.
The tomatoes, pumpkins/squashes, carrots, peas and many other veggies available today come in many varieties - significantly sweeter or less sweet varieties as well as early and late, large and small, blight resistant or susceptible, hardy and less hardy etc etc; dark green leaf veggies - cooked or salad - come in bitter (or 'strong') and less bitter varieties, as well as the bitterness being somewhat alterable by age at harvest and weather conditions ...
Corn/maize comes in low fat/high fat varieties - you don't think the growers of maize/corn for the production of oil grow the same variety as that grown for the sweetest corn on the cob, do you? Sunflowers too - the ones I used to grow in my garden for multiple cutting heads are not the same variety grown for the production of the pressed oil ... Sugar beet is basically the same plant as field or fodder beet but is a variety with a much higher sugar content ... Vegetable crops, whether grown for home consumption, farm gate sale, delicatessen display, industrial processing or entry into the Worlds Biggest Parsnip competition, vary enormously in their 'make up', from starch, fibre, and protein content through to sugar and fat/oils. Some of this is affected by growing conditions, but a great deal of it is varietal.
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
Oh yes they do, and oh yes you can!
A natural vegetable, for instance from millennia ago, would be scarcely recognisable as such either by taste or appearance nowadays.
That's true, but is it important?

I ask because I'm always suspicious of any statement that endows the word "natural" with magic qualities. Are natural vegetables (low yield, not good tasting) in any way superior to their selectively-bred "unnatural" high yield, tasty cousins? Of course not, because we'd all starve if we replaced wheat with its unappealing grass ancestor and so on.

This gets interesting when we move towards GM crops. Is there anything inherently bad about GM? Obviously there are unethical commercial uses to which it can be put (eg "terminator" infertile seeds, and "roundup ready" lock-in to pesticide) and there are some risks (eg lateral gene transfer creating super-weeds) but if those problems are managed are GM crops to be considered unnatural, and is this necessarily a bad thing?
 
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As they tend to be already partially degraded, they also fry much better* than veg oils (which straight from the bottle are mostly crap)...don't get me started on frying with Olive oil....

*More polar in nature which increases their heat-transfer at the surface of the foodstuff....
And that's exactly why I use lard or dripping to fry / deep fry with or to make roasties. :okay: I might not have the exact scientific know-how, but that's what my years of experience in the kitchen tell me.

Otherwise, I use rape seed oil. Fewer food miles on that, too, as the one I buy is UK-produced.

Olive oil only gets used for salad dressings and for making hummus. Or maybe as a bit of flavouring, right at the end.

Previous week, I bought a 2.5kg slab of pork belly on yellow sticker for £3. Turned the leaner three fifths of it into a lovely porchetta. The rest went to make rilettes de porc :hungry: And I filled up my dripping jar as well.

P.S. I do love dripping (szmalec) on toast :hungry:
 

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
And that's exactly why I use lard or dripping to fry / deep fry with or to make roasties. :okay: I might not have the exact scientific know-how, but that's what my years of experience in the kitchen tell me.

Otherwise, I use rape seed oil. Fewer food miles on that, too, as the one I buy is UK-produced.

Olive oil only gets used for salad dressings and for making hummus. Or maybe as a bit of flavouring, right at the end.

Previous week, I bought a 2.5kg slab of pork belly on yellow sticker for £3. Turned the leaner three fifths of it into a lovely porchetta. The rest went to make rilettes de porc :hungry: And I filled up my dripping jar as well.

P.S. I do love dripping (szmalec) on toast :hungry:
Spot-on! Animal fats are more saturated and in general proportionally longer chained than veg oils and so are also more heat stable....great for roasting - high temp/long time.
I also collect and reuse fats/oils/dripping.
 

lazybloke

Lying in the grass looking at the clouds
Location
Leafy Surrey
<snip>
An hour is the time it took me to turn half a swede, most of a bag of carrots, a head of celery, 2 onions, into 1cm dice and get it in a pan. I think my knife skills are reasonable, but it took an hour. It is a big pan of soup. Most people don't want to do this.
<snip>
And there lies the problem (or one of them). People not making time to cook.

A person that doesn't make time to cook is prioritising convenience over nutrition. Fine occasionally, but not as a lifestyle.
And if there's no time to cook, then maybe no time for exercise either?

The simple solution is that people need to find a healthier balance of priorities. I could certainly benefit from a small adjustment. Too many need to make much larger adjustments.

The difficulty is in motivating enough people to make this decision.
 
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