3feetplease

Discussion in 'CycleChat Cafe' started by brother, 26 Apr 2010.

  1. brother

    brother New Member

  2. ComedyPilot

    ComedyPilot Secret Lemonade Drinker

    As seen alongside:

    www.pleasedontdriveandphone.co.uk

    www.pleasedontdrinkanddrive.co.uk

    Yes, a good idea, but it is asking people to do something they should be doing anyway - someone with more time on their hands than me will quote the HC.
     
  3. twentysix by twentyfive

    twentysix by twentyfive Clinging on tightly

    Location:
    Over the Hill
    I won't look it up but it'll be something like "overtaking must be done only in a safe manner and only when it is safe so to do".

    There is no "right to overtake". So Patience is the order of the day IMHO.
     
  4. snorri

    snorri Legendary Member

    You have to wonder about any organisation in the UK which has not yet converted to metric measurements.:sad:
     
  5. thomas

    thomas the tank engine

    Location:
    Woking/Norwich
    Depending on the situation, three feet isn't that much.

    I'd be much for something which encourages driver to get into the other lane to overtake.
     
  6. Like all of the breweries? :becool:
     
  7. tyred

    tyred Legendary Member

    Location:
    Ireland
    It all depends on the width of the road. On the roads I usually cycle on, three feet and the driver would hit the hedge.
     
  8. GrasB

    GrasB Veteran

    Location:
    Nr Cambridge
    So cars shouldn't be overtaking you then. The way you ride on those roads is in primary with frequent shoulder checks & when you see a car approaching find a place to pull into.
     
  9. Hmmm. 3 feet might be fine at 20 or 30 mph in town.

    A 40-tonner passing you at 60 on a single-carriageway windy A road would be a different matter. 3 feet's nowhere near enough.

    Yes, I know they're not meant to be doing 60, but they do. And they don't like braking or changing gear to pass.
     
  10. "And if everyone complied, there would never be another collision."

    I'd dispute that. When a flat-fronted vehicle passes me at around 3 feet, at speed, on a windy day, it can take a lot of skill to avoid being pulled towards it by the suction it creates (this also causes caravans to "snake" on motorways - I'm not imagining it).

    It would be entirely possible for a cyclist to be passed at 3 feet, but then be sucked under the wheels of a large vehicle. But it'd be alright because the driver had left a 3-foot gap.....?
     
  11. S_t_e_v_e

    S_t_e_v_e ~ Vegan ~

    Location:
    Derbyshire

    +1 for you comments... Any large vehicle, dumper trucks, coaches need to be much further away.... as a minimum.
     
  12. hobbygirl

    hobbygirl Active Member

    i am only little and a lorry passed me i could have touched it. it sucked me in as it passed luckily the driver behind me was more considerate as i wobbled all over the road trying to maintain my balance. we were out cycling with our children and a car tried to get inbetween us all to turn at a junction he tried to weave in and out and got more than he bargained for when my hubby told him to get out of the car ! our children were really unnerved by the experience
     
  13. Mille

    Mille New Member

    Location:
    Stone
    I thought when the HC says to give as much room as you would a car, it means to overtake a cyclist AS IF you were overtaking a car. Not leave the same GAP between yourself and the cyclist as you would a car (ie brushing the wing mirror in some places). So a car would effectively move into the other lane on a narrower road for a cyclist.
     
  14. vernon

    vernon Harder than Ronnie Pickering

    Location:
    Meanwood, Leeds
    And milkmen and milkwomen.
     
  15. Funtboy

    Funtboy Well-Known Member

    Location:
    London via Jarrow
    :smile:He he, I'd like to see you enforce that in Central London...
     
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