9 Speed Chain Lifetime Expectancy

Rooster1

I was right about that saddle
Hi there

How many miles should I expect to get out of a Shimano HG53 9 speed chain
Mine's just dropped a link on one side so it's dead.
I reckon it has done 2500 miles (in 6 months) and through winter.
I do a lot of hills.

Sound about right?
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
2500 miles sounds good. How much has it 'stretched'? It may have been worn beyond its wear limit some miles ago.
 
OP
Rooster1

Rooster1

I was right about that saddle
I dont have a gauge unfortunately, though I am tempted to get one.
New chain ordered from Ribble, they are the cheapest at the moment £6.99 for the HG53
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
Shimano chains are OK, but aren't top flight. KMC are highly rated, and SRAM tend to be longer lived than their equivalent Shimano rivals.
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
A gauge will save you money if you use it and replace at 0.75% worn. I get 3-4 chains to one cassette and need to replace the most often used chainring every couple of cassettes. A worn out chain will wreck your cassette and chainrings in no time at all.
 

I like Skol

I don't think so, sonny!....
Location
Room 237
A gauge will save you money if you use it and replace at 0.75% worn. I get 3-4 chains to one cassette and need to replace the most often used chainring every couple of cassettes. A worn out chain will wreck your cassette and chainrings in no time at all.
Pretty much agree with this philosophy^^^^

I feel like I have done well if I get 2000 miles out of a chain on my commuter before it fails the 0.75% test
 

numbnuts

Legendary Member
Location
North Baddesley
Sit and spin and give the chain TLC with WD40 and you will get 6500 miles
 
Location
Loch side.
Chain life cannot really be measured in miles. Chain life is a function of distance, load, hygiene, lubrication and gearing.
1) Distance: I think that is obvious because it relates to how much the chain was used.
2) Load: this relates to under how much friction the chain enters and exits the various sprockets. It only wears at the moment that it articulates and, increased chain tension increases the amount of friction taking place during articulation.
3) Hygiene: The cleaner the chain, the less grit inside and thus the less friction and wear per articulated movement.
4) Gearing: The smaller the sprocket, the more the chain articulates and the more it wears.

Further, "end of life" is such a vague concept on top of the other variables, that you will get the sort of wildly-fluctuating figures seen in this very thread.
 

Tynan

Veteran
Location
e4
That all? I rue the day i chose ten speed as the running gear doesn't last long enough for me but I can still coax a year of commuting out of set before it's unrideable, so about 5,000 miles
 

boydj

Guru
Location
Paisley
2.5k miles is pretty good going for winter riding where water and grit play havoc with chains - especially for all-weather commuters who might get less than 1k miles.
 
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