A guide to ebikes

TyrannosaurusTreks

Formerly known as Giantbadge
Location
Somerset
I was reading a review on a trek road bike & came across this.
Different interpretations
There are now fewer ‘grey areas’ than there were when UK and EU laws were different, but we still found some differences of opinion among some people in the industry.

James Fitzgerald, founder of electric bike retailer Just eBike says that “according to EU and UK law there is a 10 per cent margin on the maximum speed allowed for the motors to assist the pedals. But nobody knows about that.” That means that the motor could assist the cyclist up to a 17.5mph speed, and not 15.5 mph.


On the other hand, the brothers Lyle and James Metcalfe – founders of London-based UK ebike brand Volt, said they “had never heard of” this margin for error.

Peter Eland, technical manager of the Bicycle Association, which represents cycle suppliers, manufacturers and associated companies, told us: “The 10 per cent margin was clear in the EU legislation, but it’s questionable in the UK. Some motors cut off at the maximum speed allowed, some before that, but the majority do exceed the tolerance a little.”


Read more at https://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/product-news/electric-bikes-uk-law-234973#mhEAwkPLE3fppRSZ.99
 

voyager

E- tadpole Triker
EAPC regs state 15mph +/- 10%
= 16.5 mph

regards Emma
 

gbb

Legendary Member
Location
Peterborough
I've often noticed my Crossfire appears to be giving some assistance at around 16 mph but never thought much about it. I will watch more intently next time..
 

jowwy

The bearded Powerhouse
current eapc regs
https://www.cycleassociation.uk/e-bikes/regulations-eapc-regs/

appears to be 15.5 mph , no mention of +/- 10%

regards Emma
its the same as motor vehicle speeding never quotes the +/- 10% but it does exist, because public speedometers are not tested and regulated in MOTs as it would cost way too much........

Cressida dick the police commissioner has campaigned in the past for the 10% leeway to be removed

According to a National Police Chiefs' Council (NPCC) spokesperson that the rule is a “guidance” and “not part of legislation.”

“The 10 per cent rule is allowed in guidance but it is not part of legislation.

“It is used as a rule of thumb for enforcement – 10 per cent over the speed limit plus 2mph.

“The thinking behind this is to ensure that enforcement is proportionate.”

One of the main reasons that drivers are given a tolerance when speeding offences are concerned is due to inaccuracies in equipment that is used to measure speed.
 
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There have been several senior police officers around recently that are threatening to start prosecuting based on 1mph over the limit - and claim that they are entitled to do so

SO the 10% thing on ebikes may also be dodgy
anyway - mine cuts out at 15.5 - so I'm OK
can't see anyone checking though - and how could you prove easily that it had cut out and the cyclits wasn't pedalli a bit still
 

youngoldbloke

The older I get, the faster I used to be ...
There have been several senior police officers around recently that are threatening to start prosecuting based on 1mph over the limit - and claim that they are entitled to do so

SO the 10% thing on ebikes may also be dodgy
anyway - mine cuts out at 15.5 - so I'm OK
can't see anyone checking though - and how could you prove easily that it had cut out and the cyclits wasn't pedalli a bit still
This puzzles me too - how could anyone check whether you were riding with assistance or not? - and why bother? If you were riding at 20mph for example, the sort of speed it is quite reasonable to attain on a bike under leg power alone.
 
OP
Pale Rider

Pale Rider

Guru
This puzzles me too - how could anyone check whether you were riding with assistance or not? - and why bother? If you were riding at 20mph for example, the sort of speed it is quite reasonable to attain on a bike under leg power alone.
That is true, but where things might fall out of bed is if an illegal ebike is involved in a serious accident and there is a proper investigation.

The offence is not speeding, it's using a derestricted ebike in a place where the public has access.

In other words, it is illegal to use such a bike at 10mph.

I've not heard of any cases of an ebiker being prosecuted, but there may have been one or two.

There was an incident, I think in London, in which an ebiker knocked over a pedestrian and fled on foot.

Not sure if he was ever identified.
 
This puzzles me too - how could anyone check whether you were riding with assistance or not? - and why bother? If you were riding at 20mph for example, the sort of speed it is quite reasonable to attain on a bike under leg power alone.
Yup - the only way they can check is by confiscating the bike and sending it off to an 'expert' for testing. Although I have no idea who the expert would be.
I was wondering about this the other day. According to the regulations they should have a plate on them that states power, cutoff speed (or something) but there are alternatives like the motor giving its make etc - seems a bit wolly
The plate thingy sound like the sort of the a police officer would be able to look at and settle the matter - in theory
BUT
a) who it to say you have not lobbed a bigger motor in or chipped the controller and not changed the plate
b) in any case - although my 10 year old Powacycle has a plate - my wife's new carrera folder doesn't - I asked Halfords about it and, after several days wait, they just said it complies with the regs.. i don't think they could really answer so it was just customer-service-legal-techy-answer-number 17.
I also had a look at a few in the LBS and Halfords - none had a plate

I guess they would only go as far as a check if there was a serious accident and the ebiker was potentially at fault - or if the ebiker seriously annoyed the police by being a prat.

Oh - and as far as the speed goes - according to Endomondo - I exceed 20 mph quite a lot on bike rides - and I am sure the motor cuts out legally! (I'm 59 and overweight - if I can do it anyone can!!!)
 

Mart44

Senior Member
Location
South of England
The speedometer on my Scott e-bike (Brose motor) gives a reading of 16 MPH before the motor cuts out. The trouble is that this speed is soon got used to and doesn't seem fast enough. I thought about overcoming the restriction but decided against it. I have some third-party insurance and I expect this would be void if I caused an accident and the bike was found to have been modified.

Another thing I found recently is just how much harder work it is to keep up a constant 16 MPH on an ordinary pedal bike. If ever that 16 MPH doesn't seem fast enough, try going back to pure pedal power for a while. It made me appreciate just how much assistance the motor on the e-bike is giving and also made 16 MPH seem quite fast. :smile:
 

Phil Fouracre

Über Member
Exactly what I found, soon get used to it, and don’t realise how much assistance you are getting. Interesting, you’ve got a Scott ebike, we’ve ordered two, but, they will have Shimano Steps units, looking forward to seeing how they perform. Just as an aside, did deristrict two retrofit kits years ago, and very pleasantly surprised how they felt with a bit of ‘extra’
 
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