Any opinions on these truing stands?

I've had the Tacx one for a few years and although it's a wee bit wobbly at times it does the job of truing wheels well enough. Being able to clamp it a bench/table top was a major selling point for me.

It's good enough for the home DIYer to keep on top of slightly wobbly wheels but doubt it's good enough for a serious wheel builder
 
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Location
Loch side.
I know those stands well. I used to give one away to each student in my wheelbuilding courses. It is definitely better than the one after that - the Rose one. I've worked with several of those (Rose types) under other names but they're all the same.

The Tacx stand has some drawbacks. It requires a table/bench with an overhang on the top and the overhang cannot be a falsely-thick one like for instance on some kitchen tops. It has to be solid or else you will have to cut wooden blocks to even out the underneath of the table.
Secondly, throw away the two blue plastic caps on the truing gauges. You need sound as well as vision when you true wheels and the steel gauges will give you a nice, non-damaging scraping sound that will audibly alert you to out-of-roundness.

It will take all standard axles but not modern through-axles (TAs).

Unlike the expensive Rose stand at the bottom of the page that looks like a PartTool rip-off the Tacx stand doesn't actually clamp the wheel. It is only the springiness in the legs that hold the wheel in place and it is easy to bump the wheel out of position, especially if you're used to the other type.

Of interest to the DIYer, it folds up neatly and can go back into its box without a fuss.

Match it up with a nice Yellow Spokey nipple spanner and dont' be tempted to buy a nipple spanner with lots of sizes built in. 3.3 or 3.4mm is what you want when working with brass 3.2mm nipples and a 3.2mm spanner if you intend to work with (rubbish) aluminium nipples.

Enjoy it, wheelbuilding is one of the most satisfactory things you can do other than make your own pasta and brew beer in the spare bathroom.
 
OP
Custom24

Custom24

Über Member
Location
Oxfordshire
I have the Minoura and it's very good. Allows very fine adjustment and dishing is spot on. To double check, I flip the wheel regular. Built wheels on it and it's great for a quick true up.
That one does look quite well made and takes 12-29 inch wheels. Can you explain what they mean about the Auto Centering System? Does it avoid the need for a dishing gauge? How?
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
Both legs 'float' - each leg moves out the same as the other - so keeps the hub/wheel farly central. It's not a complete replacement for a dishing tool, but if you swap the wheel around you won't need one. You do have to be careful you don't knock it, but it's done me fine so far. You can always check the wheel in frame.

It's blooming good for the cash. The best is Park and a Park dishing tool, but you are looking at mega bucks.

The Minoura is great for very accurate truing, and avoiding egg shaped wheels. PS no stand can replace the careful building, taking out spoke stresses, and re-truing. That's the key to a good wheel. Build straight, take wheel out and press hard on the rim. Ping ping. Turn over and do the same. Put back in jig and re-true, then repeat the de-stress procedure until it stops going out. Once you've done this, you won't be needing to true the wheel in use.
 
Location
Loch side.
That one does look quite well made and takes 12-29 inch wheels. Can you explain what they mean about the Auto Centering System? Does it avoid the need for a dishing gauge? How?
I have not yet come across a stand that is good enough to negate the use of a dishing gauge. When I say good enough, I don't mean one that can't be used in that way, but one that gives you the insight, speed and accuracy of such a tool. Don't assume ParkTool is always the best. Often it is rubbish, like the WAG-5 of their's. I use a WAG-1 from 15 years ago and it is miles better than the "improved" Version 5.0.
If the OP is going to build only one or two wheels, an upturned bike is his friend.
 

Smurfy

Naturist Smurf
I've built wheels without a truing stand. I used an old fork for doing the front wheel, and just put the back wheel in the bike frame without a tyre. Glad I didn't waste the money and acquire yet another item that needs to be stored when not in use.
 
I use the Park one which is very good.

As someone pointed out before Christmas, Planet X are doing a similar stand but a lot cheaper.


http://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TOJWWTS/jobsworth-wheel-truing-workshop-stand
That one looks like a copy of the Park Tools one, I read somewhere that is also quite sturdy. So, it looks like a good buy.

I can feel somebody doesn't like Park Tools.... I own a few Park Tools products and I'm happy with them. I have the Park Tools TS2.2 truing stand and it's very good, it does what it says on the tin. I first bought the WAG-4 for a dishing tool and I didn't like it so much but I managed to get myself a WAG-3 that I think is better.

Park Tools came out with its own copy of their TS.2.2 truing stand for around £100, worth looking at I think.
 

Gravity Aided

Legendary Member
Location
Land of Lincoln
I use a previously made and branded equivalent of the "Zent" stand Rose offers. Seems to do quite a good job, on all sizes of wheels. But if I were buying something new, I would buy the Park. I find their quality best.
 

themosquitoking

Veteran
Location
Spain
[QUOTE="Yellow Saddle, post: 3496783, member: 39857"

Enjoy it, wheelbuilding is one of the most satisfactory things you can do other than make your own pasta and brew beer in the spare bathroom.[/QUOTE]
I have never heard this phrase before.
 
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