Best Bike For A 40 Mile Total Day Commute

Discussion in 'Bikes and Buying Advice - What Bike?' started by AhThisFeckinThing, 20 Aug 2012.

  1. AhThisFeckinThing

    AhThisFeckinThing Active Member

    Any advice. 40 miles in total a day. I have been doing 20 Miles per day for a good few years, but may have to change my circumstances and commute 40 :wacko:. I currently commute on a Specialized Secteur Comp 2012, which is lovely, but I don't want to really knacker the thing, as I use it on rides out on my days off. Half rural, half urban journey, possible part trains as well. £1000 limit, cycle to work scheme (But with very limited shops, Halfords and Associated Stores) . Would a hybrid or something with slight suspension at front be a better option?
     
  2. lejogger

    lejogger Über Member

    Location:
    Wirral
    I think on the Halfords scheme you should be looking at something like the Boardman CX Team if you have a mixed terrain route. I assume mixed terrain, or is the rural section on road as well? If so, you definitely don't want suspension. Many on this forum have the Boardman and they are well thought of. You can get your rack, panniers and guards on no problem so a perfect commuter really.

    Obviously there are other CX options available through the Halfords scheme such as one of the Specialized Tricross which seem to be equally as well thought of among these parts, and if you're used to Specialized already it might be a good option.

    The Halfords scheme is much more flexible than it once was. I would suggest finding the bike first and then going through the special order line to see if they can source it for you. This year they've also been allowing the use of LBSs or recommending an LBS that's close to you and stocks what you want rather than sourcing from elsewhere if you really didn't want a Halfords offering.
     
  3. vickster

    vickster Legendary Member

    :laugh: I know the roads are bad in the UK, but usually urban areas have roads (of sorts), so do rural areas, but they also have footpaths and livestock to avoid

    There are some very good LBS which take Hellfrauds vouchers, all a bit depends where you are and what you want

    If a hybrid flatbar is preferred to drops, I'd look at the very lovely Whyte Cambridge at £900 and the Sterling at £1000 if you want to max your spend
     
  4. lejogger

    lejogger Über Member

    Location:
    Wirral
    Oops :blush:
    I'll fix that!
     
  5. Mo1959

    Mo1959 Guru

    Just had a look at the Whyte Cambridge out of curiosity as I hadn't heard of it and Tri UK have them for £675 at the moment. Looks like a bargain.

    http://www.triuk.com/products/whyte/whyte-cambridge-2012
     
  6. MacB

    MacB Lover of things that come in 3's

    I did that length of commute on a lightweight hybrid and a Surly Crosscheck, the latter far heavier with hub gears etc. No need for suspension IMO as long as you can fit decent size tyres and I much preferred the heavier bike for the day in and day out ride. Both bikes were setup with the same cockpit whereas the Xcheck was more of a sit in bike, without being too touristy, and the lightweight one was more a perch on top.

    Towards the end of the week when you're tired the sit in bike becomes a far comfier beast.
     
  7. A motorbike? :tongue::whistle:
     
  8. mcshroom

    mcshroom Bionic Subsonic

    Location:
    Egremont, Cumbria
    If it's low maintenance you want then I'd look for something with hub gears. I'd definitely stay with drops though over that distance.
     
  9. vickster

    vickster Legendary Member

    Whyte do a couple of CX bikes too :smile:
     
  10. biggs682

    biggs682 Smile a mile bike provider

    Location:
    Northamptonshire
    loads of nice bikes at that kind of money , what about the Marin range
     
  11. MacB

    MacB Lover of things that come in 3's

    For regular gears I'd go the Disc Trucker for hub gears the Crosscheck...steel forks....well I sold my expensive carbon ones on my road/cross bike and replaced with Salsa La Cruz steel disc forks. My 29er is fully rigid with Salsa steel forks and my tourer has the Surly LHT disc forks.

    If there is a comfort difference then, IMO, it's more than offset by being able to run big tyres at lower pressures.
     
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