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Bikes that are good enough for racing.

Discussion in 'Bikes and Buying Advice - What Bike?' started by stevenb, 28 Jan 2008.

  1. stevenb

    stevenb New Member

    Location:
    South Beds.
    I have wondered what bikes are suitable for racing.
    I appreciate that mine for example is pretty cheap at £850...albeit reduced from £1050.

    I see club riders with some pretty darn tasty exotica when I'm out and about.
    Do you reckon they use them for racing too or just training?
    I'm not a club member so I'm not sure.

    I can fully appreciate that a quality rider is the most important aspect but even so there must be a cut off point or a modest standard of bike which is really good enough for competition.

    Tour De France riders have a range of bikes for the different stages.
    is there a bike that is within financial reach that is a good all rounder.....I'm not including time trial as I think the frame geometry on these is different and not a run of the mill bike.
    A bike that can climb, sprint, be lightweight but strong and nimble....affordable and good enough to race.:girl:

    I look forward to hearing your thoughts and opinions.

    Steve
     
  2. yenrod

    yenrod Guest

    My bike cost 450 - i could easily race it !

    The problem wiht roady bikes Steve is that on most if not the majority the head tube is far too long thus jutting the position 'high up'.

    Someone could make a few bob from those who know bikes (the buyer-established cyclist) and the angles/positions by making a bike with a sloping TT AND and short head-tube.

    Equals - a bike for all disciplines ! :girl:

    BTW - if you know of any frames like this let me know :girl:

    [​IMG]

    Though the wheels, stem/bars/r.deraileur/crankset+BB & tyres have changed.

     
  3. walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    What sort of racing are you looking at Steve? and I take it you are going in at cat 4? I've seen many different bikes at races ranging from a cheapie Halford's Carrera's all the way up to Scott Addict's and pinerello Prince's but these are generally around Cat 1-2 and up.
    TdF rider's don't really have different bike's for different stages as the constant changing from one frame to another would be a disadvantage rather than an advantage, although different rider's have ther own prefernece's on what bike and components they prefer.
    What bike are you riding? I started out with a £700 Giant and took that along to races only upgrading the wheels.

    If you feel you could hold your own in a pack and can do a steady 22mph on your own, you can do 25mph in a pack.

    Go along, see what it's like and compare your self rather than your bike.
     
  4. walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    If your up to it Steve, the Hillingdon Winter series is still on, if you want to try it out pop along on Saturday and Let me know who you are and we can go round together
     
  5. yenrod

    yenrod Guest

    I dont understand you saying 'walker' that a prince is the bike for 1-2nd cat races..not true at all.

    I could easily ride my bike in a big race.

    Thats why american manufacturers went away from shimano as they where saying you need so and so group.set for a certain bike (when mtbing was getting established) yet its obvious that at the end of the day a gearset is a g.set whatever its application...for example.
     
  6. walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    Yenners, I don't think you read my post correctly. You can race any bike you like in any cat you like, but your more likely to find The like's of a Pin Prince etc, around cat 1 and 2, Meaning you don't need something flash now to start racing. Yer get me?
     
  7. yenrod

    yenrod Guest

    Walker: I always shop with the intention of cheap & lite.

    The most expensive INST always the best - but yes, its usually that.
     
  8. walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    You've gone totally off topic there Yenners:smile:

    The question was about is his bike good enough to race, I was just saying yes it is as you see really cheapy Cheapo's all the way up to the ridiculously expensive. Are you swigging a bottle of gin as you read these? :smile:
     
  9. RedBike

    RedBike New Member

    Location:
    Beside the road
    If you're good enough then you'll win on near enough any old bike. However, if you're like me then you'll want every advantage available.

    I would avoid bikes with Shimano Sora levers, because they've very difficult to use while on the drops; and you'll want a reasonable frame with a good close clearance geometry. I suppose you're talking about bikes upwards of approximately £400. In terms of must have parts, light wheels (perhaps semi areo) seem to help the most.
     
  10. Tynan

    Tynan Veteran

    Location:
    e4
    to quote the immortal chuck yeager

    'remember, its the man, not the machine'

    I shot my brother down once using a spitfire against his phantom
     
  11. stevenb

    stevenb New Member

    Location:
    South Beds.
    Thanks for your thoughts guys.
    I wasn't asking if my bike was good enough for racing.
    I was generalising about the level of bikes that are used in races...beit sportives etc etc.
    I can appreciate that any good rider can do well on a bike with adequate technology but there must be a point at which regular club riders and regular race entrants choose a more exotic machine?

    I know with a quality set of wheels and a chainset upgrade I'll be pleased with my bike and I reckon it'll be almost sub 17lb in weight too.....not that light.....but light enough I suppose.
    :evil:
     
  12. yenrod

    yenrod Guest

    Very rarely do i drink alcohol! ;)
     
  13. walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    you've pretty much hit the nail on the head there steve. weight plays a big part in the sport now, th lighter the bike, the easier it is to get it up a hill.
     
  14. stevenb

    stevenb New Member

    Location:
    South Beds.
    Done the math....the wheelset/tyres/tubes and cassette are lighter than the ones I was going to originally get so after these items are added at a cost of approx £510 I'm hoping for 16.75lbs.
    So that means for £1360 (the bits above plus £850 for my bike) I've got a pretty light bike.
    When my mechs wear out I'll replace them with Dura Ace ones.
    I'm prolly going to buy a new saddle too as mine hurts my ***** after a while...so more weight saving there.

    So I guess I've answered my question now.;)
     
  15. walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    HAHA, Steve the lighter the saddle the more it hurts, there isn't that much padding on the lighter ones, the lighest being just plain carbon. Although that depends what saddle you have. Go for it steve, but don't get cut up on weight saving on everything as the lighter parts arn't so durable