Brakes - oops!

EasyPeez

Über Member
"That's making a nasty sound" I thought to myself the other day, "it must have some grit stuck in the pad, I'd better take that off and give it a good scour at the weekend".

Weekend arrived, pad came off....don't think a clean is going to help! Lesson learned, now I know what those little ridges along the top of the pad signify!

With the disc brakes on my new bike, how will I know when the pads need replacing? Just when I can't adjust them in any further? I don't want to leave those ones too long like I did these, and risk damaging my disks.

Cheers,
Andy
 

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Pale Rider

Legendary Member
If you look at the disc pads now when they are new you will be able to see the depth of friction material.

When that's worn flat, the pad needs replacing.

Pads generally last a long time, depending on use.

I've yet to wear any out, but my weekend mileage is divided between three bikes.

I see you are aiming for a lot more than me - 4,000 - @ianrauk has his posted mileage/pad wear figures which I can't recall, but he will.
 

w00hoo_kent

One of the 64K
With the disc brakes on my new bike, how will I know when the pads need replacing? Just when I can't adjust them in any further? I don't want to leave those ones too long like I did these, and risk damaging my disks.
According to my MTBing friend you get a ticking noise from disc brakes as they start to get close to needing replacement, but I'm yet to need to replace mine, so haven't experienced that yet. Keep an eye on the friction material, replace when they are getting dangerously close to the metal is what I intend to do (unless I do eventually hear the clicking noise). I'll probably replace mine before they need it, it's hardly like it'll break the bank for a couple of pads.
 

ianrauk

Tattooed Beat Messiah
Cheers @Pale Rider

When they are worn down to the metal then the retention spring makes an awful noise against the rotor. You will then know they need changing. But you shouldn't let them get that far, like you shouldn't have let your rim brakes pads get that worn.

For gawds sake, you need to get in the habit to check pads periodically for wear. Not only to save your rims damage but because it may also cause you some grief.
It's easy to check pad wear, you can see quite easy how much pad is left.

I am now on 6000+ miles on my disc braked commuter bike I bought last April and have yet to change the pads, but they are not far off. At £5-£6 a pair, it's a bargain.
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
That's nothing! I suggest you set the toe-in a bit better when fitting new ones to even out the wear across the whole pad :tongue:

When I got home from today's 12hr shift I HAD to put replacement pads in my XT disc brakes. They have been getting a bit noisy for a while so I guessed they were ready to be changed but they weren't high on the priorities list. The last couple of days has been accompanied by an intermittent scraping that was getting more and more persistent until today when it was constant and no matter how loud I turned up the volume on my ipod it could still be heard :eek:

Anyhow, these came out....
View attachment 60207

... and have been replaced with genuine Shimano metallic pads. Serenity returns :bicycle:

Next job on the horizon is a chain, cassette and middle chainring swap as the current ones are getting quite tired.
 
OP
EasyPeez

EasyPeez

Über Member
For gawds sake, you need to get in the habit to check pads periodically for wear
I thought I was! I wash my bike once a week and was checking the rubber pads on the old bike then. But it turns out what I thought was plenty of solid rubber left to go at actually was a hollow bit of rubber with an angry lump of metal inside. You live and learn!

I watched a Youtube video on how to change my new Spyre disc pads and gave that a go, so having had them out I know what I'm dealing with this time and how to keep an eye on them. Cheers.
 
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