carbon or Alloy

Hippy

Regular
Location
Suffolk
Hello.
I am looking for some helpful advise and thoughts on buying a new bike.
i wouldn't say i was new to cycling i have an old Dawes giro that i paid 75 pounds for about 8 years ago as i needed a road bike to complete a challenge i had been set, (cycle from Suffolk to Paris) not wanting to shy away from this challenge and look silly in front of friends i said, Yes of course, A nice intro into road cycling i thing, although parts of my body were not in agreance. a quick stop to buy cycle shorts with padding after the first day. Anyway a few less ridiculous rides later and unfortunately a bit of a break from cycling I feel the need for a new bike to get back into it. I am looking at Ribbles sportive 7005 (an alloy frame) and the sportive racing Di2 carbon frame. My question is, can anyone give advise or help on choosing between the two? having never ridden a carbon bike, how are they in comparison? I am looking to put the ultegra group set on which i believe to be good and a pair of fulcrum wheels, i think this should make for a good bike on either frame?
Hope this wasn't too much for first post? Sorry..
 

Justinslow

Lovely jubbly
Location
Suffolk
Hi I would say try a few alloy and carbon bikes and see what feels best for you, you may prefer one to the other, you may not. Only you can decide.
 

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
Go and try out.

I tried two carbon bikes at Merlin Cycles recently. One was made with "posh" carbon, had Ultegra Di2 on it and Shimano RS81 C24 wheels (the one I tested did, anyway), it was substantially lighter, higher spec and more, er, "modern" (eg flattened seat stays for long distance comfort) than the one that felt right underneath me, which tweaked my bling requirements and responded to my inputs with something approaching character. They were give or take the same price but I am getting the nominally worse bike because it gave me a big grin whereas the other just annoyed me.
 

midlife

Guru
Possibly more to do with size / geometry than material. The expensive carbon Cervelo I tried just didn't feel like it belonged under me. Bought a Basso instead which was cheaper ........ But not by much lol

Shaun
 

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
Possibly more to do with size / geometry than material. The expensive carbon Cervelo I tried just didn't feel like it belonged under me. Bought a Basso instead which was cheaper ........ But not by much lol

Shaun
Absolutely valid, I have no idea exactly why one left me feeling bored and the other, involved in the ride. Things may change down the line but I can't wait to get back on the Sensa.
 

gbb

Legendary Member
Location
Peterborough
To counter that, im 10.5 to 11 stone and have the New Sportive Racing and at my weight, never felt an ounce of flex...which I could in many of my other bikes, one alloy frame i had from a very reputable manufacturer was terrible when I got out the saddle and gave it beans.
Dragos point is good though, but he is a big fella I gather (no offence meant drago).

Again, if you are a big fella, watch the Fulcrums, they have recommended rider weight limits. I have the 5s and love them and on one occasion the front took a hell of a hit down an unexpected drain ...no damage whatsoever.

Comparing the two...alloy against carbon.
If I weighed my 531, alloy and carbon frames, i suspect there's very little difference between them, . However a full carbon fork is exceptionally light.
Ride quality...the carbon Ribble does seem smoother than my old ally Bianchi with full carbon fork.
At the other extreme, my Renolds 531, 1980s technology is supremely smooth, as good as carbon, if I could I'd buy a 531 frame with modern geometry, that'd be something..I think.
 

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
To counter that, im 10.5 to 11 stone and have the New Sportive Racing and at my weight, never felt an ounce of flex...which I could in many of my other bikes, one alloy frame i had from a very reputable manufacturer was terrible when I got out the saddle and gave it beans.
Dragos point is good though, but he is a big fella I gather (no offence meant drago).

Again, if you are a big fella, watch the Fulcrums, they have recommended rider weight limits. I have the 5s and love them and on one occasion the front took a hell of a hit down an unexpected drain ...no damage whatsoever.

Comparing the two...alloy against carbon.
If I weighed my 531, alloy and carbon frames, i suspect there's very little difference between them, . However a full carbon fork is exceptionally light.
Ride quality...the carbon Ribble does seem smoother than my old ally Bianchi with full carbon fork.
At the other extreme, my Renolds 531, 1980s technology is supremely smooth, as good as carbon, if I could I'd buy a 531 frame with modern geometry, that'd be something..I think.

You can, or at least a 631.
 
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Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
4130 shares very close physical characteristics to 531, so the feel isn't unobtainable if you wanted it.
 
OP
H

Hippy

Regular
Location
Suffolk
Thanks all.
I am 14 half stone and someone else has said to be careful with wheels as well. I think i need to take a day and go looking and trying different bikes.
i always thought the carbons were for those that had a bit more money to spend, but looking around now i realize they are not too bad and therefor is more a personnel preference. Shows what I know about bikes really, i just know how not to fall off of them, Well mostly.
 

mrbikerboy73

Über Member
Location
Worthing, UK
I've got an aluminium Giant Defy and a carbon Defy Advanced. I can't feel a huge difference when I ride them tbh. Yes the carbon is a bit lighter but I found a far bigger difference when changing from 23mm to 25mm tyres and dropping the pressures a bit as far as the comfort aspect is concerned.
 
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vickster

Legendary Member
I'm about 14.5 stone too, never had a wheel issue, any stock wheels nor fulcrum 5s

Carbon bikes can be bought for under s grand but won't be the newest frame, the latest r&d etc, or necessarily the newest parts
 

ayceejay

Guru
Location
Rural Quebec
If you are new(ish) to cycling I doubt that you will find any difference between the riding quality of the bikes mentioned. Both Ultegra and Fulcrum are tried and tested items so I see no problem there but pay attention to saddle and tyres and a proper bike fit (not easy if you buy online) as these will effect your comfort more than the frame material, with the exception of carbon forks I guess.
 
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