Chain sets and hydraulic disc brakes on e-bikes?

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I got a cheap e-bike, only cost around £750, but in the main it does what I want, however there are three points I would like to alter.
1) I want a spare battery, 48 volt, but this I have as yet not tried to get, so this may come up latter.

2) I want to move from mechanical disc brakes, I have once failed to keep them adjusted up, not on an e-bike, and found going down Symonds Yat they would slow me down, but however hard I pulled would not stop me until I reached the bottom, lucky met nothing on the way, but realised they can reach end of cam travel if not kept in adjustment, so want hydraulic type which are less reliant on adjustment. But local bike shops say you can't get them with the micro switches needed for an e-bike, however I have seen e-bikes with hydraulic brakes, in fact fitted to my wife's e-bike, so what is the problem?

3) The gearing is to low, at 16 MPH my legs are going silly, I do need the low gears for hill climbing, but I am putting in next to nothing effort at cruising speed as my legs can't move that fast, motor in rear wheel, so can't see the problem, but I get sorry can't change front chain set. I can understand this with wife's bike where the front cog is domed around the motor, but not with mine with motor in rear wheel.

On the canal tow path I just take it easy, and travel slower, but on the road want to get some speed so less likely to be shunted by cars.
 
I have had 4 ebike ( long story) and that all sounds a bit strange

If you have a rear hub motor then the drive system forward of it should just be normal bike stuff - so changing the chinring should be simple

and I have never had a system where I couldn;t change the rear gear system

however - you never know

might help if you can say the make and model - and maybe some pictures - so people can maybe see the problem

but in any case - all my bikes have been set so that at 15 mph I was pedalling happily in about 4th gear - no spinning out in top gear!
 
OP
OP
ericmark

ericmark

Senior Member
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The bike in question.
 

Juan Kog

permanently grumpy
A photo from the other side with a close up of the chain set would help . Sorry other than that no advice , I know nothing about electric bikes .
 

CXRAndy

Guru
Location
Lincs
The gearing I could find for that bike indicates it has these gears
https://doctorscooter.co.uk/product/smlro-mx300-electric-bike-500w-48v

Cassette:Shimano MF-TZ500, 14-28T, 7 speed
Crankset:Accura steel 24-34-42T

Using Bikecalc.com with the wheels and tyres listed for the SMLRO MX300 and a selection of higher gears to indicate cadence and speed.

With your current gearing at 15mph your are pedalling at 65rpm.

If you were to buy and fit a 7 speed 11-28t cassette, you cadence would be 50rpm for the same 15mph.

https://www.chainreactioncycles.com...weG1hvv8XNh1YJWzqJgaAhmhEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
That would be the cheapest way to lower your cadence. In cycling terms these are quite low cadences, but not unusual if you're a casual infrequent rider


gearing ebike.jpg
 
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Not worth spending a lot on, so I would be inclined to fit only a front hydraulic brake.

Should be simple, provided the front brake is a component on its own and the lever is not linked to any other controls.

One complicating factor might be a motor cutout switch, if there is one.

There might be one on the back brake, and in any event they are not regarded as essential.
 

Drago

Legendary Member
By the time you've shelled out on hydros and whatever it takes to resolve the gearing you could have simply bought a bike with hydros and decent gearing. I really wouldn't be inclined to spend any more on it in your position. Probably not what you want to hear, nevertheless...
 

Jameshow

Über Member
Di hydraulic brakes compensate for pad wear?

I presume they do as in car brakes but how?!
 
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CXRAndy

Guru
Location
Lincs
Di hydraulic brakes compensate for pad wear?

I presume they as in car brakes but how?!

Yes, the pistons gradually move outwards as the pads wear. Like cars/motorbikes, brake lever travel will be more pronounced as the pads get thin. I found that Shimano hydraulic brakes had too much lever travel before biting, I devised a method of setting the pad gap and pressurising the system to eliminate this dead spot before pads engage
 
All the Shimano hydraulic disc brakes I've used have had bite point adjustment, or rather you can wind the lever in a bit which means the brake will actuate with a very small movement of the lever.

Not that I've ever felt the need to tinker with it.
 

Jody

Stubborn git
All the Shimano hydraulic disc brakes I've used have had bite point adjustment, or rather you can wind the lever in a bit which means the brake will actuate with a very small movement of the lever.

Not that I've ever felt the need to tinker with it.

Bite point (free stroke) adjust was for the higher end groupsets xt/xtr.

Lower models only have reach adjust.
 

Phaeton

Grumpy Old Barstool
Location
Oop North (ish)
Should be simple, provided the front brake is a component on its own and the lever is not linked to any other controls.
I was going to put that e-bikes have microswitches on the brakes to cut the power to the motor when applied, my wife's step thru hub motored one did, however just been out & looked at my Cube which has Shimano hydraulic brakes & there's no switches, but it's a crank motor not sure if that makes a difference.
 
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