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Chain splitting

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by Night Train, 15 Jun 2008.

  1. Night Train

    Night Train Guest

    I need to get a new chain splitting tool, what would you recommend. Currently looking at this one.

    Also, am I correct in thinking that I can split a chain anywhere or is there a master link somewhere I have to use. Last time I split a chain I was a kid and the chain had a removable link in it.

    Thank you.
     
  2. Night Train

    Night Train Guest

    Also, are there different sizes of chain and how do I tell which I should be using please.
    Thanks.
     
  3. yenrod

    yenrod Guest

    Im using a KMC with a POWERLINK - you shorten it to the length you require and off you go !

    The 'PL' can split open so as to clean it etc...

    So, technically, no need for achain tool/extractor.

    Get any SRAM, Shimano, Campy, KMC, etc...
     
  4. piedwagtail91

    piedwagtail91 Über Member

    count the number of sprockets on the back hub to find the type of chain 7,8,9,or 10. then join with a powerlink as mentioned above.i'm using kmc on one bike and sram chain on another.you'll get the joining link if you buy sram or kmc, but you can buy them seperately.
    i use a park chain tool.
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Categories.aspx?CategoryID=148
     
  5. Mr Pig

    Mr Pig New Member

    Location:
    North Lanarkshire
    Most of these tools are pretty much the same and all do the job. Just check it'll go down to the size of chain you're using, most do.

    As has been said, get a Power Link rather than join the chain with a tool. It's never happened to me but I've seen a couple of people's chains snap where they joined it with a tool so I guess you can get it wrong. A Power Link is not only simple to fit but lets you take your chain off really easily to clean it, which is great as you can give it a real good wash out.

    Even if you do buy a Power Link, still buy the tool. I always carry one, and a spare Power Link. You never know.
     
  6. Joe24

    Joe24 More serious cyclist than Bonj

    Location:
    Nottingham
    I have a ParkTools chain splitter. Cant remember the code of it. Its the mini one with a triangle bit at the back for a handle. Its a nice tool. It is also ment to be able to do any derailier(crap spelling) chain.
    I just split the chain anywhere, but when i split them a new chain goes on. I can never be arsed to mess around with the powerlinks so i just pick a link and split it. When i put the new chain on i do use a powerlink so I dont get a weak link.
     
  7. swee'pea99

    swee'pea99 Legendary Member

    I use one of these.
    Easy peasy, never had any problems with it. Never used a powerlink, just split the chain anywhere & rejoin it when I'm done. I suppose you *can* screw it up if you're an eejit, but it's really easy not to. (If this model's the same as the one I use, which I think it is, you just screw it as far as you can, and that takes the pin to just the right position - ie, far enough to disengage the barrel, with a little wiggle, but still firmly gripped by the link, ready for screwing back in.)
     
  8. Night Train

    Night Train Guest

    Ahhh, so the powerlink is like the removable link I found on kids bikes in the 70's. That makes it easy then.

    With chain size is it just dependent on the number of sprockets on the rear wheel? More sprockets = thiner chain? and everything else is the same?

    I am going to be using a combination of parts from all sources to mock up the transmission of my recumbent/HPV. Is there a direction/brand/type I should tend towards in terms of matching components or should I just get whatever I think I need?

    Thank you.