Changing forks ,

ozboz

Veteran
Location
Richmond ,Surrey
I may need to change the forks on my GFs Spec Rockhopper , its got rock shox on it now but we need to get the bike to a lighter weight for a bikepacking jaunt over quite a long distance , would a normal set just fit in ? It is also a bit heavy on the back end , any tips on how to shave some weight off there also .
 

Salty seadog

Space Cadet...(3rd Class...)
You would need to get suspension adjusted forks if you were thinking of fitting a ridged set. You have to account for the travel to keep the geometry the same or it would be like riding it now with the suspension permanently at full compression....

Given the changes you intend (no suggestions for the rear) maybe a bike built for the task.
 

SkipdiverJohn

Deplorable Brexiteer
Location
London
Why bugger about engineering a suspension bodge up? Just use a factory-built fully rigid bike. For less than you'd spend messing around replacing parts, you could pick up useable rigid secondhand if you keep your eyes open. A quick bit of precautionary maintenance attention from a pot of grease and an oil can it'll be ready to go.
 

12boy

Veteran
Location
Casper WY USA
Many feel mtn bikes with road or cyclecross tires make nice touring bikes. Most mtn bikes have brazeons for panniers, relaxed geometry and apart from the tires and suspension don't weigh more than touring bikes. Surly bikes sells separate forks, too. If the bike fits your GF well that is important as well. If it doesn't and can't be made comfortable a new bike might be better.
 

ChrisEyles

Veteran
Location
Devon
As above, measure the axle to crown distance and aim for something similar or a little shorter to account for suspension sag.

I did this some years ago, swapping a 455mm rubbish Sus fork for a 420mm rigid cromo fork on my 90s Marin and if anything it improved the handling.

The Kona P2 forks do look good and come in a range of sizes, so I'd start by setting if there's anything suitable on flea bay.
 

ChrisEyles

Veteran
Location
Devon
Shaving weight off the back... Can only really think of a lighter tyre here. By the time you've bought a new rear wheel plus fork you may as well buy a nice 90s rigid MTB as @SkipdiverJohn suggests.
 
OP
OP
ozboz

ozboz

Veteran
Location
Richmond ,Surrey
Will not be buying another bike, invested to much on this Rockhopper, and she likes it to much ! , I’ll have a look round and see what I can get my hands on , I’ve got a set of 26” wheels that are perhaps a better lighter option but I would have to get forks with the disc mount on , also tinkering with the 1x option and 11-42 on the back ,
 

SkipdiverJohn

Deplorable Brexiteer
Location
London
Will not be buying another bike, invested to much on this Rockhopper, and she likes it to much ! , I’ll have a look round and see what I can get my hands on , I’ve got a set of 26” wheels that are perhaps a better lighter option but I would have to get forks with the disc mount on , also tinkering with the 1x option and 11-42 on the back ,

The most I've ever paid for a secondhand 26" MTB is £20, and the best condition one of those has probably never done even a hundred miles at the most, because everything on it is still like new after 25 years!. No kind of tinkering with your existing hardtail bike, no matter how trivial, is going to work out cheaper than getting a used rigid that's already fit for purpose as it comes. Fitting 26" wheels into a frame designed around a larger size will introduce unwanted side effects such as reduced ground clearance, and the weight saving is not going to amount to more than a few ounces.
 
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