Changing pedals often an issue?

Mralexrides

Active Member
Assuming I correctly remove pedals and put new ones on correctly, does it matter or risk damaging the threads changing pedals often? I will be changing flat to clipless and back to flats. Have you any tips for removing or knowing which pedal is left or right? If its not indicated on the pedal? Thanks
 

iluvmybike

Über Member
Not if you do it correctly! On clipless pedals it will be obvious which are R or L. On flats it is usually marked either ono the end of the axle or on the spanner flats
 

T4tomo

Guru
look out for L and R marked on them, remember L is reverse thread, apply a bit of lithium grease to the threads, and don't cross thread them - start them off gently by hand making sure your are square onto the pedal
 
start them off gently by hand making sure your are square onto the pedal
This is my favourite golden rule - I've no doubt it has saved me many expensive mistakes. You CANNOT put them on wrong this way!
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Having said that ... I think repeated assemble/disassembly has drawbacks, so I'd disrecommend it. But if the poster is happy with those drawbacks, carry on - I just think (s)he may be underestimating the hassle.

On the plus side, they should never be seized on when you REALLY need to take them off!
 
Start the thread off by hand in the reverse direction. When you hear it click you can start rotating by hand in the correct direction.
You need the tighten pedals quite firmly.
You might wear out the thread your soft and expensive aluminium cranks.
 

Jody

Guru
I swap pedals all the time depending on what riding i'm doing. You'll be fine as long as you follow the advice above
 
OP
Mralexrides

Mralexrides

Active Member
You can get pedals with SPD (MTB version) one side and flat on the other. Much more convenient than swapping pedals. I use them on bikes used for both tootling round town and longer rides.

https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/shimano-xt-t780-spd-trekking-clipless-mtb-pedals/rp-prod67250

There are cheaper versions.
Thats ideal mate thanks!
 

boydj

Guru
Location
Paisley
Start the thread off by hand in the reverse direction. When you hear it click you can start rotating by hand in the correct direction.
You need the tighten pedals quite firmly.
You might wear out the thread your soft and expensive aluminium cranks.
Pedals don't need to be all that tight. Finger-tight and just a little more is plenty, especially if you are changing them frequently.
 

cougie uk

Über Member
Those shoes say they're for indoor cycling. Never heard of the make. I'd get a known brand from a proper bike shop. Comfort is key.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Found this on amazon pretty light and with the spd cleat:

View: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B08SJR69G4/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=AG2KIIGJS9SEP&psc=1


is it too good to be true? so i can pedal in normal shoes or use spd if I'm inclined. Would they work with these shoes

View: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B091GRTM2T/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A24X97WGA4NT1J&psc=1
You won’t want to walk on those shoes on a small slippery metal cleat standing proud of the shoe. Get some mtb or touring shoes with a properly recessed cleat if you value your neck!
something like this

View: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shimano-Unisexs-BMT301L43-Parts-Standard/dp/B07FGLPXVR/ref=sr_1_10?crid=15LMBKZVHRFP3&dchild=1&keywords=shimano+mountain+bike+shoes&qid=1623360622&sprefix=Shimano+mountain%2Caps%2C168&sr=8-10
 
OP
Mralexrides

Mralexrides

Active Member
I don't mind a normal cycling clip in shoe if I got the option of the flat pedal. I guess a mountain bike shoe would make sense but I love the look of those shoes in particular
 
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