Confused over which bike to get

Simba1off

Active Member
Hi
I've got to loose the weight, I'm 47 and over 18st, the doctor has told me to get rid of it. I'm not built for jogging but as a kid I use to ride a bike alot and was fitter for it. I wish to join a riding club in my home town can't make my mind up as to wether I get a Sports type of bike or a touring Audax one. Can one keep up if I go for the touring type option with a sports bike on a club run out? Since my days as youth using a cheap "Racer" bike I use to cover miles cycling one my own. But in a club I would imagine that most members would have a sports type of bike. Any body got some advice? I've been invited to visit the club and intend on doing so to talk with the members. However looking at the pics on their web site it seems that they do cater more for the sports road bikes. I have only got around £700 to spend on a bike, so I do need to spend it wisely and it would be sometime before I could afford another.
Mark
 

numbnuts

Legendary Member
Location
Home
When was the last time you rode a bike ??
Most cycle clubs would expect you to average 13-14 + mph, unless they have slower groups you will not be able to keep up, and it would put you off cycling.
If I were you I would buy a bike that you can ride and not buying one that fits with the image on fast cycling groups.I don’t know what your fitness level is, so I can’t comment, but buy a bike and then see how you get on riding on your own first and then join a club. Good luck
 

accountantpete

Brexiteer
If you are serious about losing weight and cycling then the once a week club rides will not be sufficient.

Ideally you should be looking at getting out 3-4 times a week in conjunction with a reasonable diet.

Personally I'd advise getting a cheap second hand bike with triple chainrings to help you up the hills and then if you like it graduate to something better.
 

g00se

Veteran
Location
Norwich
Hi, Good luck with the endeavour. Just as another option, check to see if the CTC operate rides in your area. They tend to be a bit more inclusive and relaxed than some road clubs and might be a good way to start off and see how you want to develop your riding.
 

Banjo

Fuelled with Jelly Babies
Location
South Wales
Welcome to the forums

,I was in a similar position to you and used cycling as a way to lose weight and get fit.Without starving myself but cutting down on fatty foods biscuits etc I lost 4 stone in about 9 months and have kept it off for another 9 months so far.

Most cyclists have more than one bike eventually. Rather than go straight in for a roadracer you could do what i did and get a hybrid bike to start with,It wont be wasted even if you later want a racer as the hybrid can be rigged with panniers etc and be used as a daily workhorse.

You could get a decent Hybrid for under 4 or£500 easilly.I have a Trek hybrid which i use for commuting to work ,shopping etc etc.the beauty of it at your stage is that the versatility encourages you to do lots of shorter rides burning off calories and strengthening your leg muscles as you go along.

Hybrids arent confined to short trips, I did a 100 mile charity ride on mine once and people have used them as tourers.

If your still keen on a racer in 6 months time you will be fitter and more knowledgeable about the type of bike you want.

Do a google on Evans or Tredz bikes. They have hundreds of bikes on their websites to get an idea.

Good Luck
 
OP
S

Simba1off

Active Member
Welcome to the forums

,I was in a similar position to you and used cycling as a way to lose weight and get fit.Without starving myself but cutting down on fatty foods biscuits etc I lost 4 stone in about 9 months and have kept it off for another 9 months so far.

Most cyclists have more than one bike eventually. Rather than go straight in for a roadracer you could do what i did and get a hybrid bike to start with,It wont be wasted even if you later want a racer as the hybrid can be rigged with panniers etc and be used as a daily workhorse.

You could get a decent Hybrid for under 4 or£500 easilly.I have a Trek hybrid which i use for commuting to work ,shopping etc etc.the beauty of it at your stage is that the versatility encourages you to do lots of shorter rides burning off calories and strengthening your leg muscles as you go along.

Hybrids arent confined to short trips, I did a 100 mile charity ride on mine once and people have used them as tourers.

If your still keen on a racer in 6 months time you will be fitter and more knowledgeable about the type of bike you want.

Do a google on Evans or Tredz bikes. They have hundreds of bikes on their websites to get an idea.

Good Luck
Hi
Thanks for the reply & advice.
I'm looking forward to getting a bike and I'm totally amazed at the number of makes on the market. I just didn't expect their would be so many too choose from.
Regards
Mark
 

Martok

Klingon on a bike
Location
Watford
I started with a Trek 7200 hybrid (costing £400) but I'm about to move to a Specialised Secteur Elite. I liked the Trek to start with but I find it a bit on the heavy side. If you're thinking of joining a cycling club you may find a heavier bike to be a disadvantage, plus it's likely that many in the club will be road bikes with drops and you'd have a hybrid with straights.

If you want to consider a more sporty type of bike but don't want an out-and-out racer, then one to consider would be the Specialized Secteur Sport. At £650 it's within your budget, it's light at 21lb (compared to my hybrid at 39lb). The ride position is a bit more upright than a standard road bike which may suit you (one of the reasons I'm going for the Secteur Elite, the next model up from the Sport).

It's worth thinking about this, if you get it right now for your £700 budget then it'll have you paying out more in 6 months time in upgrading to another bike.
 

HJ

Cycling in Scotland
Location
Auld Reekie
If you are spending £500 - £700 you should be able to get a good bike which will last you for years, I would suggest a hybrid rather than a road (racing) bike. The best thing is to find a good local bike shop (LBS) and try test riding as many as you can (if they would let to test ride the bikes, walk away and don't go back), then buy the one that feels best.
 

mcshroom

Bionic Subsonic
As you used to have a racer, you may feel better on a drop bar bike than a flat bar hybrid, but it would be best to try things out at a shop before parting with any cash.


The answer to what bike really depends on exactly what you want to do with it. If you want to blast around the lanes at break neck speed (eventually) with little in the way of luggage then a road bike is probably best. If you go for one of these consider whether you want to be able to add things like mudguards, as not all road bikes have them.mean any

If (like me) you want to do long distances with a bit of kit or generally carry stuff to and from work for instance, then a tourer may be a good bet. They are a bit heavier than road bikes but the gearing is a bit lower usually so climbing should be a little easier.

A tougher bike that is quick but can handle an off-road excursion or two then cyclocross bikes like the specilized tricross and Edinburgh Bicycles' Revolution Cross series may be suitable. A bit heavier than a road bike but not quite a tourer.

'Hybrid' can mean anything from a flat bar racer like the Specialized Sirrus to a slicked up mountain bike like the Carrera Subway.


I know that probably hinders rather than helps, but the main advice would be to go and try some out in a local shop and see which one you like the feel of. Outside of the local shops and national chains, Edinburgh Bicycle Cooperative and Decathlon have some good bikes to look at too. If you find a properly fitting and bike that you like to ride you will go out on it more though and so it's a better bike than a higher spec bike you don't ride
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These are of course all my own opinions, and someone will come along in a minute and rubbish them suggest something different.
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HJ

Cycling in Scotland
Location
Auld Reekie
I would be weary of recommending a road bike to someone who hasn't cycled for 30 years and who is "over 18st", maybe in a years time he may want to get into serious road riding, but for someone who is just starting out a more upright bike makes more sense. There is nothing wrong with getting a flat barred bike, which is comfortable to ride and practical for going to the shops and for use as regular transport, as part of a health life style.

The bicycle market in the UK has for year been fixated with cycling as a leisure activity hence the preponderance of road bikes and mountain bikes. There is nothing wrong with that if you only interest is sport, but if you looking at cycling as a means of transport as part of a health life style, and cross over to the Continent where this is seen as a normal, you find the more upright bike are more common. Of course once you have gotten into cycling, you soon realist that the idea number of bikes is i=n+1.

If you start out with a flat barred bike and find that you enjoy riding it, you will always find a use for it, if you start off with sporty looking bike because that is what is fashionable, you may find that having you arse in the air is not for you and quickly give up, but then I don't work for Halfords and I am not trying to sell you a bike... ;)
 

BenScoobert

Senior Member
Location
Halifax
I would be weary of recommending a road bike to someone who hasn't cycled for 30 years and who is "over 18st", maybe in a years time he may want to get into serious road riding, but for someone who is just starting out a more upright bike makes more sense. There is nothing wrong with getting a flat barred bike, which is comfortable to ride and practical for going to the shops and for use as regular transport, as part of a health life style.

The bicycle market in the UK has for year been fixated with cycling as a leisure activity hence the preponderance of road bikes and mountain bikes. There is nothing wrong with that if you only interest is sport, but if you looking at cycling as a means of transport as part of a health life style, and cross over to the Continent where this is seen as a normal, you find the more upright bike are more common. Of course once you have gotten into cycling, you soon realist that the idea number of bikes is i=n+1.

If you start out with a flat barred bike and find that you enjoy riding it, you will always find a use for it, if you start off with sporty looking bike because that is what is fashionable, you may find that having you arse in the air is not for you and quickly give up, but then I don't work for Halfords and I am not trying to sell you a bike... ;)
Depends on your build, I'm 17.5 stone and feel quite comfy on a drop handle road bike and if you were to guess my weight youd probably say I was 14-15 stone.
I have a friend at 15 stone and he's twice my waist size, just depends on your frame.

My best advice is go to your LBS and try a few out, I didn't know what I wanted until I rode a few. Youll know what feels right.
I've got a crois de fer coming tomorrow, I'll post after my 1st ride and let you know, although it is £1k and over your budget.
 
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