Cycling wearing out knees?

Discussion in 'Training, Fitness and Health' started by confusedcyclist, 11 Feb 2019.

  1. confusedcyclist

    confusedcyclist Über Member

    I was chatting to a fellow dog walker this morning, my lengthy commute came up, the other fellow, presumably non-cyclist claimed that cycling 20miles a day, day in day out will bugger my knees. I've never heard of this, yet, nor have I spoken to any 80 year olds that cycled that sort of distance their entire working lives.

    4 years in, no signs of knee trouble, if anything my legs are stronger than ever. Is there any merit in the claim?
     
  2. Threevok

    Threevok Junior Member (Trainee)

    Location:
    South Wales
    My knees were buggered before I took up cycling :laugh:
     
  3. Drago

    Drago Soiler of Y fronts

    My knees actually caught fire through cycling very fast, so it can cause damage. I once saw a fellows knees explode as he honked up a steep hill.
     
  4. raleighnut

    raleighnut Guru

    Location:
    On 3 Wheels
    It will knacker yer knees if the saddle is too low.
     
  5. screenman

    screenman Legendary Member

    Cycling stops my knees getting worse.
     
  6. vickster

    vickster Legendary Member

    My knee was buggered coming off a bike but cycling is benecial to stopping it being even more rapidly buggered. It’s key to get the set up right, including cleats/foot position. You can of course have strong legs but muscle imbalance which could lead to knee issues
     
  7. dave r

    dave r Dunking Diddy Dave Pedalling Pensioner

    Location:
    Holbrooks Coventry
    I've been cycling for over 50 years and my knee's are fine, its the rest of me that's knackered.
     
  8. tom73

    tom73 Über Member

    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Well who knows I’ve one that’s on the way to being totally mashed. But that’s more down to it having been subjected to multi dislocations. For the adding of some hard core metal work down the middle of my tib.
     
  9. Slioch

    Slioch Veteran

    Location:
    York
    I personally wouldn't believe anything a dog walker told me, however if it had been a random bloke down the pub saying that then it would obviously be true.
    ^_^
     
  10. Reiver

    Reiver Ribbit Ribbit

    if cycling hurts your knees then continuing to cycle could well bugger your knees. But if it doesnt then it will probably be doing more good than harm, movement is good for joints.
     
    HLaB likes this.
  11. ColinJ

    ColinJ It's a puzzle ...

    Cycling almost certainly puts less strain on the knees than dog walking!

    (Assuming that you aren't trying to do steep hill repeats in a 100 inch fixed gear, or something equally daft.)
     
    HLaB, Cranky Knee Girl and raleighnut like this.
  12. Make sure your bike is well fitted, and don’t strain your knees, and cycling is one of the lowest impact / best for your body activities you can do.
     
    raleighnut likes this.
  13. screenman

    screenman Legendary Member

    I think swimming beats it, cycling only gets me fit for cycling, unfortunately.
     
  14. Fab Foodie

    Fab Foodie hanging-on in quiet desperation ...

    If you can find some evidence, let us know. It’s bollocks. How many ex-pros are in wheelchairs?
     
    dave r and Andy in Germany like this.
  15. I've been to the doc's with a slightly iffy knee and was told I should keep cycling because that's the best thing I can do for it.

    We still have my Grandfather's cycling logbooks from the 1920's & 30's: he cycled very respectable distances around Sheffield and Manchester, sometimes riding over the Pennines while the rest of the family took the train to Manchester (and beating them) on an 'all steel Raleigh' single speed. He was walking well right up to the end: it was dementia that stopped him, sadly, not knees.

    On the other hand, look at all the health problems caused by using a car all the time, to say nothing of the danger you cause yourself and others.
     
    Last edited: 12 Feb 2019
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