Delta trike rebuild - starting with half a Kettwiesel

OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
OK, good idea. I won't count my chickens just yet, but one of the team at ICE now knows what I'm looking for.

I've decided that the simplest way to avoid drilling the Hase main boom is to mount seat and steerer bearing with Stauff-type clamps at right-angles. I can also try out different positions, more forward or back, to judge what would feel best.

Hase ICE interchange.jpg

Whilst there's not much actual progress with the build, the various components needed are turning up - I picked up a new, complete Magura HS33 hydraulic brake set for the front fork last week, for a tenner plus postage. With Julie on the rear rotors, and HS33 on the front rims, the Kett will have the same spec that's on the Lepus I've been riding.
 
OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
I got some "me" time this afternoon, putting it to good use by sorting through the contents of several boxes. Once done, there was enough space to do something useful - the first thing on my list: spreading the forks from 95mm to 100 OLD.

IMG_20191208_180526.jpg

IMG_20191208_180916.jpg

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I've got a nice Deore hub and a black rim to build up, but in the meantime I'll use this no-name silver wheel with a Big Apple on to gauge dimensions.
 
OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
I had to meet with the accountant today, to finalise the books for the year end; that being done, everything to do with work can now be put to bed. Later on, I spent a couple of hours split between sorting out in the shed and the garage, then onto a task completely new to me - using a die and stock to extend the threading on the fork tube.

I think my average for the number of times I watch an online video of "how to" do something before actually going and trying it myself is three. But, I reckon this task may have upped the average, a bit.

Before.jpg
Swarf.jpg
After.jpg


I've still got to seat the crown race, and cut the groove into the fork tube - I'll not cut the tube until the steerer arm and light bracket have been fitted.
 
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OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
Good news - parcel from ICE arrived this week, containing a Sprint seat frame (cosmetic damage only, but I had real difficulty finding any). As per Voyager's suggestion. I'll use an old mesh seat cover from an ICE Q to complete.

Bad news - the newly-threaded fork has a crown seat dimension of 27.2mm, but the headset crown race has i.d. of 26.3mm. Looks like I've successfuly spaced and threaded a JIS fork, only to find I'll need some more precise work to make it fit my ISO headset. :laugh::cry:
 
OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
Forks now with Cycle Clinic in Glemsford, awaiting milling. Hoping that Malcolm can get that done as soon as he's back to work after the holidays.

I've started on the Seat clamp / Boom / Steerer axis by cutting three aluminium plates ready for drilling - they'll lock the pipe clamps into right angles, and also secure the head of the 12mm bolt immediately below the main boom (the 12mm bolt will hold the steerer bearings).

My old ICE Q seat frame (with same dimensions as the new one) is securely held in place on the boom when all the nuts are tightened.

Steerer Axis and clamp.jpg
Steerer bearing and barclamp.jpg
 
OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
Completed drilling the plates for the seat/boom/steerer mount; dremel and small hand files used to cut out the hex shape on plate 2 (which prevents the 12mm bolt head from turning). The dremel proved useful again with a router bit and stand, to remove a hex-shaped recess in the base of the paired stauff-clamps (recess accommodates the remaining height of bolt head above plate 2). Bolt lengths are currently too long.

Seat Boom Steerer clamp parts.jpg


Seat Boom Steerer clamp assembled.jpg


Whilst waiting for the fork, the front wheel can be built up (the new spokes arrived yesterday). :smile:
 
OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
Does anyone else here find wheelbuilding strangely relaxing ? Maybe it's the pattern repetition, maybe it's the fact that you only get to know if you've measured everything correctly right at the very end. So that's another thing crossed off the list - the shiny Deore hub, s/s spokes and black rim match the appearance of the rear two wheels. Tidy !

Components 1.jpg

Completed 1.jpg
 
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OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
I collected the forks from Malcolm at Cycle Clinic in Glemsford early this week, but due to a chesty cold, and feeling knackered after just one day at work, I left them untouched in the garage until this evening.

The milling of the crown race from JIS to ISO needed tidying up, and then I had to work out how to cut two keyways into the threaded section of the steerer.

Two notches in fork.jpg


With very much an improvised set up, I ended up with two straight-ish notches - the result is a steerer tube that will take the light bracket (notch at 180 degrees), and the steering arm (notch at 90 degrees).

Fork with light bracket and steerer arm.jpg


The steerer arm doesn't need to be that big (it's an old heavy-duty light bracket), but metal off is always easier than the alternative .........;)
More tomorrow, I hope.
 
OP
Bad Machine

Bad Machine

In the garage .....
Location
East Anglia
Here's the first attempt at putting both ICE seat frame and steerer assembly onto the Kettwiesel frame. What quickly becomes apparent is like this, the chain line between crank and rear cassette would run straight through the base of the seat, and its support.

Seat and support 13Jan20 1.jpg


More pleasing is seeing the new aluminium MTB handlebar working well with two titanium "uprights" (that were left-overs from the original Hase hand-trike.) Researching the different varieties of Kettwiesel that have been made over the years, single front ring Kett's range from 39T through to 52T, which would result in a slightly different front height for the chain run, depending on what ring I choose. I'll need to provide some leeway for the route in case I need to change the size of the front ring. I'd like to solve the problem by modifying the seat support so the chain (tube) can clear all obstacles, and run unimpeded, rather than having to add an idler wheel.

First thought is to widen the distance between the ICE seat frame supports, and increase the height between them and the top of the boom clamps. The chain could then run through the gap this creates.

Seat and support 13Jan20 2.jpg


I'll mount the bottom bracket and crankset as a next step, then set the boom position to roughly what I'll be needing - some trial and error with the chain in place will reveal what to change with the seat clamps, and also whether the return route for the chain will clear the steerer's handlebar.
 
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Nigelnightmare

Senior Member
On the Hase the seat base frame is in the middle of the main tube.
Also the Hase seat base has a lower/deeper frame to allow clearance for the top chain tube.

It looks like the lower chain-line will also go through the handlebars, if so they will need moving as well!

HTH
Good luck.
Edit
Copied from my reply in "What have you fettled today".
I didn't realise it was on here as well.
 

Nigelnightmare

Senior Member
If you used an Idler it would have to be floating or you'll end up with a compromised chainline as you run through the gears, as the chain run is rather short from the seat mount to the cassette.

Looking forward to see how you resolve this.
The alloy the seat frame is made of doesn't weld easily as it's tempered. Ask ICE.
 
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