Di2 Battery holder stuck in seat post (Giant TCR/Liv Langma)

jfh777

New Member
**Full disclosure; I'm not a cyclist, and don't know a great deal about performance road bikes, just trying to help the GF**

Hi all,

I’m wondering if I can get some advice. Recently the GF’s Liv Langma (I’m told the male equivalent is a Giant TCR) has started playing up with the Di2 battery suddenly going flat overnight, or worse depleting part way through a ride.

I’ve had the seat post out and can see the battery holder. There’s some evidence that at least one of the cell’s has leaked. The problem is the battery holder seems completely wedged into the post and all attempts to persuade it out have failed. I’ve undone the small Allen screw in the rubber section above the battery but can’t see that there’s anything else that would be holding it up. I’m presuming that the leaking battery hasn’t helped and might have had the effect of welding it in place.

My other suspicion is that the battery pack should have never been inserted this far into the post, it leaves absolutely nothing to grip on/work with when it comes to getting it out, apart from the plastic shroud of the terminal, which if I put any amount of pulling force on is just going to mangle/crush.

The only option I see is to very carefully cut the carbon fibre post down 2 cm to reveal enough of the battery holder that it can be pulled out. The trick will in cutting each side of the post only to go through the carbon fibre and not the battery holder.

Including some pics, I’d be keen to hear if anyone has any better advice or alternatives.

Cheers
 

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I don't have a definite answer and have no experience of Ui2/Di2., but can you not take the saddle off and push something down the seat tube to ease it out?
 

the_mikey

Legendary Member
If it's any help, the part on the side of the battery is a retaining wedge, is there anything like a hex key or something that will release the tension in the wedge and release the battery? It needs to turn to release the pressure on the battery (would imagine you need to turn anticlockwise, but you need to check), do not cut the seatpost!


Wedge example.png
 
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Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
If it's a retaining wedge as the mikey says, then if it doesn't shift when the bolt is undone pulling it will only wedge it in further. If all else fails then a counter-intuitive push might be enough to release tension on the wedge.
 

silva

Well-Known Member
Location
Belgium
Maybe hold the bike upside down and use a rubber hammer to help gravity?
That's what Popeye did and it only costs some spinach. How much is the spinach there?
 

cheys03

Senior Member
Don't take my word for it as I've no direct experience. The wedge pic above from @the_mikey suggests it might be similar to a older wedge stem. Try turning the Allen bolt that's been removed back in so that the threads only meet for a couple of turns, then whack the bolt head with something like a screwdriver or punch and a hammer. Not too hard, but more than a tap. This might undo the wedge as @Drago described and allow the battery to be drawn out.
 
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silva

Well-Known Member
Location
Belgium
The battery is not in the seat tube, @silva : see images - so no amount of hammering or spinach will help. An allen key might, though.
'Self-generated" :laugh:
I don't get it, the topics question says "battery holder stuck in seatpost" and on the 2 pics I see a raindrop shaped cross section tube with height marks with a seat on its end.
So what it is now?

That wedge shaped mounting system appears very similar to the one of the handlebars.
 

JhnBssll

Veteran
Location
Suffolk
The wedge in question is a bit of a nuisance to be honest - the lower section is rubber and fairly soft. If the battery was installed as per instructions there will also be a self adhesive rubber pad stuck on the upper metal half of the wedge or on the battery itself to keep it in place.

Pulling on the battery by the connector end while its still wedged in will probably just have the effect of pulling the end cap off and exposing the cell and electronics, you dont want that. I would suggest you remove the Allen bolt completely and wind a wood screw or similar in to the rubber bottom wedge part and pull it out - that should free the whole lot up enough to pull the battery out. When assembled its not a super snug fit so you should be able to get it out with some perseverance. I wpuld avoid knocking things up for now as once you've made that move theres no easy way back :laugh:
 
OP
J

jfh777

New Member
Neither do I, but it doesn't look too far in, can you not get a set of pointed nosed pliers & grip the centre plug to give it a pull?
Thanks everyone, really helpful. This worked, I was previously trying with some fatter pliers trying to grip the whole of the plastic plug/terminal which would slip. Some pointed nose ones allowed me to grab just a small bit, but really grip it hard. Have to say though, the amount of force required was on the limit of what I was prepared to use for fear of doing some damage.

I did inspect the top of the seat post to see if there was any option for pushing it out from up top, but there's no way in.
 

JhnBssll

Veteran
Location
Suffolk
Thanks everyone, really helpful. This worked, I was previously trying with some fatter pliers trying to grip the whole of the plastic plug/terminal which would slip. Some pointed nose ones allowed me to grab just a small bit, but really grip it hard. Have to say though, the amount of force required was on the limit of what I was prepared to use for fear of doing some damage.

I did inspect the top of the seat post to see if there was any option for pushing it out from up top, but there's no way in.
Great work, well done :okay: I've dealt with a battery stuck in seatpost incident and in that case I pulled the end cap out of the battery accidentally hence the warning :laugh: Glad you were able to sort it 😊 when replacing, note there are two types of internal battery. The latest is the DN-110 and this is needed for a few of the latest functions such as synchro shift. You'll also need this one if the bike has a wireless unit, otherwise you can probably pick up the older BTR2 slightly cheaper.
 
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