Direct Mount Brakes

Ruary

Senior Member
I'm currently looking at getting a new bike for some TT's and Triathlons this summer and one of the bikes near the top of my list is a Merida Reacto, the only thing putting me off is the direct mount brakes (BR-5810) I don't know anyone who has them and although on a short test ride they feel fine and my LBS assures me they are fine I'm not usually one for going for something so different.
There doesn't seem to be much advice online, I assume that's because they aren't very popular and this in itself puts me off a bit, it's a real shame as apart from the brakes the bike itself felt great.
Anyone got any experience or opinions?
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
What are your concerns about them? If it rides well, has a competitive warranty, and the price is right then get that wallet out.
 
OP
Ruary

Ruary

Senior Member
It's more the positioning of the rear caliper under the bottom bracket, seems a really strange set up and I do wonder if it will pick up more road muck than standard brakes and cause problems in the wet
RMbrake.jpg
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
Why would they pick up more muck? They're a quarter of a turn further on than conventional calipers and shielded behind the stays. It wouldn't be bothering me in them at if the bike was otherwise ok.
 

w00hoo_kent

One of the 64K
I've not used them, I am considering (in a wistful and while I'm dreaming I'd like a pony kind of way) getting them added to the singlespeed in the household to keep it looking clean but mean it has two brakes on it finally.

However, the point, I overheard a couple of TTers discussing the Shiv when I was at Specialized HQ last year. Both were owners and were extolling everything about it, except the brakes (it has direct mount) which they both agreed were uniformly shite. They are there to make it more aerodynamic, which they succeed at, and everyone knows every watt counts in competition, but by all accounts give less braking capability then standard mount calipers so I guess it depends on how much slowing down matters to you.

My feeling would be if you were just doing TT's then it'd be worth the risk, but Tri's always look like they have more technical courses to me and I'd worry more about the brakes than being aero at that point.

(Naturally this advice is worth exactly what you've paid for it :-) )
 
Location
Loch side.
I'm currently looking at getting a new bike for some TT's and Triathlons this summer and one of the bikes near the top of my list is a Merida Reacto, the only thing putting me off is the direct mount brakes (BR-5810) I don't know anyone who has them and although on a short test ride they feel fine and my LBS assures me they are fine I'm not usually one for going for something so different.
There doesn't seem to be much advice online, I assume that's because they aren't very popular and this in itself puts me off a bit, it's a real shame as apart from the brakes the bike itself felt great.
Anyone got any experience or opinions?
There is nothing wrong with direct mount brakes per se, they offer better opportunities for aerodynamic design (I say opportunity, because in themselves I don't think they are more aerodynamic, you require a brake fairing for that) and work fine. However, your concern about the back one is legit. They don't do well in the wet at all and constantly jam, rub, grate and generally irritate you. Cable routing is often not good either, adding to the woes. They pick up much more wash that higher-positioned one and I think are suitable for a pure TT bike only. And then perhaps dry TTs to boot.

Don't compare them to that found on Specialized and Trek TT bikes of three or four years ago. Those were proprietary designs that used a cam to actuate the two arms and were positively rubbish. The Shimano design is infinitely better, but still not optimal.

If all else is the same, go for conventional. If the frame style you want is only available in this style, grin and bear it. If you will be doing any peloton riding with this bike, choose traditional brakes instead. The reason for me saying this is in the peloton you brake a lot whereas in TT you don't even need brakes.
 
OP
Ruary

Ruary

Senior Member
Thanks for your help everyone.
Going for another little test ride on Saturday but if I'm honest I've not got my heart set on the bike and I'm edging away from getting it the more I read about it.
 
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