Disc brakes on a road bike

Kevoffthetee

On the road to nowhere
What are the benefits of disc brakes on a road bike and are they worth the extra money on a new bike? I can think of more disadvantages such as cost of parts, cost and availability of replacement/upgrade wheelsets but can they be justified

I'm fancying a Felt Z75 disc and the spec seems good for the money but in thinking of the future in case I fancy an upgraded wheelset at some point
 

BSRU

A Human Being
Location
Swindon
The main benefits are consistency of the excellent braking performance in all weathers and no rim wear.
Wheelsets has been an issue but gradually more and more are available plus if you go for handbuilts it's not an issue.
 

the_mikey

Legendary Member
The only drawback is a lack of any standard among component and bicycle manufacturers, and the problem of the rotors being bent regularly in the workplace bicycle stand. Those will mostly sort themselves out in time, apart from the workplace bicycle stand :angry:
 

ianrauk

Tattooed Beat Messiah
The only drawback is a lack of any standard among component and bicycle manufacturers, and the problem of the rotors being bent regularly in the workplace bicycle stand. Those will mostly sort themselves out in time, apart from the workplace bicycle stand :angry:

How are they bending rotors in the workplace bicycle stand. I haven't managed to bend a rotor in 3 years of using disc brakes and putting the bike in a stand.
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
Disc brakes are better for commuting, winter training and touring. For road racers, they don't offer a whole lot. There is also a danger of injury in a mass pile-up.
The technology/standards is still in development and the big manufacturers are hamstrung by their development model, ie develop for professional sportsmen and trickledown for the amatuer mass-market.

Wheel-bender bike stands should be avoided by all cyclists, disc or no disc.
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
I have hydraulic discs on three bikes - Magura, Tektro and Shimano.

All have been fitted and forgotten faultless.

I don't do enough miles to come up against pad life, but @ianrauk has reported 6,000+ miles on his commute - he's not known to hang about and rides, as I understand it, from Kent into south east London which is bound to be stop/start.

Slight wheel buckles are not the problem they are on rim brakes.

Pads, should you need them, are cheap, and I can't see rotors ever wearing out in normal use.

Braking performance is at least the equal of rims, if not better,

But other than all the above, disc brakes are rubbish.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
Disc brakes are better for commuting, winter training and touring. For road racers, they don't offer a whole lot. There is also a danger of injury in a mass pile-up.
The technology/standards is still in development and the big manufacturers are hamstrung by their development model, ie develop for professional sportsmen and trickledown for the amatuer mass-market.

Wheel-bender bike stands should be avoided by all cyclists, disc or no disc.
Not that nonsense again. The discs are inside the forks and stays, along with the 32 razor sharp spokes we've all been riding for years without problems. And unlike the rings with 53 teeth that are spinning merrily on the outside of the frame without decapitating anyone.

Or maybe you're thinking of those spinning discs on 200mph GP bikes and all the severed limbs they've caused during the last half century? Can't seem to recall any myself, though.
 

oldroadman

Veteran
Location
Ubique
Disc brakes are better for commuting, winter training and touring. For road racers, they don't offer a whole lot. There is also a danger of injury in a mass pile-up.
The technology/standards is still in development and the big manufacturers are hamstrung by their development model, ie develop for professional sportsmen and trickledown for the amatuer mass-market.

Wheel-bender bike stands should be avoided by all cyclists, disc or no disc.
What they do offer is being denied a start, because at present disc brakes are not permitted for road racing.
 

Citius

Guest
Unless you're planning on racing within the next couple of years, it's the way to go.
 
OP
Kevoffthetee

Kevoffthetee

On the road to nowhere
I'm not planning on racing, ever. In the past I've got too competitive at sports and I'm not ruining cycling by going the same way. I'm just trying to weigh up pro's and cons with trade offs on components

Eg felt z75 105 disc vs giant defy 0 ultegra
 

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
From what I understand the difference between ultegra and 105 is largely weight. I'd go for the Felt, not least of which is that the 2015 disc model looks gorgeous and I find Giant bikes a bit meh in the visuals department:evil::laugh:
 

oldroadman

Veteran
Location
Ubique
I'm not planning on racing,[/B] ever. In the past I've got too competitive at sports and I'm not ruining cycling by going the same way. I'm just trying to weigh up pro's and cons with trade offs on components

Eg felt z75 105 disc vs giant defy 0 ultegra
Just like I promised my late dad about 100 years ago, and then it happened, and I'm glad that's one promise I didn't keep - so was he, by the way.
 

PK99

Legendary Member
Location
SW19
Not that nonsense again. The discs are inside the forks and stays, along with the 32 razor sharp spokes we've all been riding for years without problems. And unlike the rings with 53 teeth that are spinning merrily on the outside of the frame without decapitating anyone.

.
I though the potential peloton issue was hot discs in a pile up
 
Top Bottom