Dual Carriageways

Whats everyones opinions on cycling on dual carriageways?

Im considering cycling to work more often but my route involves a few dual carriageways.

Would you personally cycle on a Dual Carriageway or do you think it is too dangerous?
 

classic33

Legendary Member
Cycle on them all the time, including two elevated ones.

Don't let them put you off cycling, like everything else it takes time to get used to them. Try & find an alternate route you can use before you find out you don't feel safe on them. This will at least allow you to continue cycling to work.
 
Liamblink182 said:
Whats everyones opinions on cycling on dual carriageways?

Im considering cycling to work more often but my route involves a few dual carriageways.

Would you personally cycle on a Dual Carriageway or do you think it is too dangerous?
It depends on the dual carriageway as with everything. I cycle along a few urban ones, the sort of 30, 40 or 50 mph limit ones where traffic is actually only ever going 25 mph at most during rush hour. That seems safe enough but I wouldn't consider the A3 up to Petersfield that seems like suicide to me.
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
There are only a handful of dual carriageways I won't cycle on either because they are restricted or they are that bad. Most dual carriageways are fine and actually more pleasant. One does get more honking of horns and aggro from motorists on dual carriageways though who seem angered greatly that they have to use the overtaking lane.
 

TWBNK

Well-Known Member
Location
Wirral
I cycle occasionally along this road, it is a short stretch of national speed limit dual carriageway, I have had no problems so far but I need to be assertive in my road positioning because the road here curves and rises over a bridge.

Although I usually travel quite slowly up here I always take an assertive position in the left hand lane before the curve and up to the crest of the hill so that people see me early. The last thing I want is for a lorry and van to be making a third lane with me squished into the kerb.
 

wafflycat

New Member
I've done dual carriageway sections of A11 and A47, amongst others - and has already been stated - you use your local knowledge of whether you think it's ok to cycle any given stretch of road. Dual carriageways can be fine - smooth surface, overtaking traffic in another lane... but you do have to keep you wits about you and use your local knowledge
 

Norm

Guest
automatic_jon said:
It depends on the dual carriageway as with everything.
+1

The A332 between Windsor and Slough feels a death trap for cyclists. Cars ver seldom even move to the right hand side of lane 1, and I've never had one move into lane 2 to pass, even at the quietest times.

Strangely, because it is a continuation of the above road, I have never had a problem on the A308 Goslar Way in Windsor.
 

al78

Guru
Location
Horsham
Rural dual carriageways where you intend to go straight on or turn left at junctions are fine.

Urban dual carriageways where the traffic speeds are comparable to a fast cyclist are fine.

Rural dual carriageways where you will need to use lane 2 to turn right or go straight on are the ones I have a problem with.

Dual carriageways with grade separated junctions are probably best avoided.
 

iamanidiot

New Member
Here's what I think about dual carriageways, and it's just my opinion. The main dual carriageway sections I see are on the A9 between Perth and Inverness, everything else is motorway. Whenever I see a cyclist on these I wonder why they are on it. There is an excellent network of cycle tracks (most of them on the old A9 with excellent road surface) that they could be using. One or two cyclists is generally not a problem though, where I really question sanity is when you see cycle clubs out. Now I know, it's a better road surface, and one has every right to be there. But the long large pack, taking up a lane, and moving at 30mph does not really mix with the car drivers who just want to get past that articulated lorry. Surely a better route could be found? It seems designed to wind car drivers up (not me, i'm chilled, but I can see why they might).
 

iamanidiot

New Member
The above isn't necessarily relevant to the OP by the way, it's just some thoughts. If I was commuting, I would probably try to devise a route that avoids dual carriageways (though only if the limit is 70mph), but if there is no alternative route I would use it/them.
 
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