Feet hitting front wheel

richtea78

New Member
I am looking for a bit of advice please.

I have only recently just started cycling again having had a break of 15 or so years. I brought a Scott Sub 20 after testing out several bikes and was fairly happy with it. However whilst out riding today I caught my foot in the front wheel while turning a corner and it was pretty off putting.

Once I noticed it I tried to replicate it again to make sure it wasnt a freak accident and if I have the pedals at a certain position relative to how the front wheel is turned I catch my feet on the wheel. I dont understand how I didnt notice this while test riding the bike but could anyone tell me if there is any modifications I can make to avoid it or should I take the bike back to the shop and get a different size one?

thanks for your help
 
richtea78 said:
could anyone tell me if there is any modifications I can make to avoid it
You need some smaller feet ;)
 

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Hi richtea78 and welcome...

What you describe is 'Toe-Overlap' and is not uncommon. It's a function of the bike's geometry and size.
Assuming your feet are in the right position on the pedals (ball of foot over pedal spindle) there is nothing you can do about it. Thing is, you soon get used to it and avoiding contact becomes automatic. I have the same on my fixed wheeler and it's not an issue.

You'll soon forget it.
 

slowmotion

Quite dreadful
Location
lost somewhere
What is the position of your foot on the pedals? It is generally a good idea to have the ball of your foot at the centre of the pedal. If you have your heel there, I guess it could be a problem, but I'm just guessing.

Welcome, by the way.

Edit: FF beat me!
 

g00se

Veteran
Location
Norwich
I've got toe overlap on my bike. I understand it's quite common on compact frame bikes like these hybrids. You just get use to pedalling around it. It only tends to happen if you're steering at slow speed.
 

gaz

Cycle Camera TV
Location
South Croydon
Quite common, as others have said it's something you soon learn to live with. Although i do sometimes catch my self out whilst trackstanding.
 
OP
R

richtea78

New Member
Thanks, looks like its something I will have to learn to live with then, although I hope it wont take long!

However now that you mention about feet on pedals I have no idea which part of my feet are where on the pedals as I just put them there automatically, never really thought about it ;) Will give that a try and check.
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
richtea78 said:
However now that you mention about feet on pedals I have no idea which part of my feet are where on the pedals as I just put them there automatically, never really thought about it :blush: Will give that a try and check.
If you are not thinking about it, then you are probably doing what most beginners do naturally which is to put the middle of your feet on the pedals. (If you were wearing heeled shoes, the front of the heels would be hard up against the backs of the pedals.) That would mean that your toes would be sticking out in front of the pedals and you'd have a severe overlap problem.

I'd suggest getting yourself some SPD pedals and shoes. That system holds your feet in the correct position once the cleats (metal clips that sit in recesses in the soles of the shoes) are alligned properly. Once you do that, you'll then need to start a thread saying that you had a problem unclipping your feet and fell off your bike - we all do that! ;)
 

Brahan

Über Member
Location
West Sussex
I have it on my TT bike. You'll learn to ride without it happening soon enough though.
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
I have it on one of my bikes too, it's most likely to happen to me as I'm setting off and turning round, doesn't really happen at other times.
 
I know I have toe overlap on some of my bikes but I forget which one; it isn't really a problem. For a toe strike you've got to be going very slowly to turn the wheel far enough for toe strike. At speed you never turn the wheel that much, its almost impossible (certainly for a rider of my lack of ability).
 

Landslide

Rare Migrant
Generally, toe overlap occurs at low speeds, and whilst disconcerting isn't normally catastrophic.
At higher speeds, you should be cornering with your outside pedal at the bottom of the stroke, this will aid balance and also keep your feet out of the way of the front wheel.
i.e. Turning left, right foot is at bottom of pedal stroke and vice versa
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
My Pug PX10 would have overlap if it had 25mm 700C tyres or 27" HP tyres.
It has 23mm 700C tyres and the clips miss the tyre by about 1mm, phew!
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
Landslide said:
Generally, toe overlap occurs at low speeds, and whilst disconcerting isn't normally catastrophic.
At higher speeds, you should be cornering with your outside pedal at the bottom of the stroke, this will aid balance and also keep your feet out of the way of the front wheel.
i.e. Turning left, right foot is at bottom of pedal stroke and vice versa
Riding along slowly while standing up, turn the steering to allow your shoe's toe to come stiffly jammed onto the front tyre.

This is a 'unexpected braking' incident. Are you still on the bike? ;)
 
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