Found, Surly LHT, Repair Help.

OctoberKing

New Member
Location
Louisiana
Hello,

I recently uncovered an old Surly LHT that was in an old flooded outbuilding. I live in southeast Louisiana and back in 2016 we had some terrible flooding here.

So after getting the bike home I realized that I was going to need to replace the Crankset, Cassette, derailleur and Bottom Bracket . The cranks spin easily as well as the cassette, I was surprised that they were not frozen solid but the Chainrings were destroyed.

I've decided to replace the drive-train with a Sram NX Eagle Dub Groupset and a Sram Dub English Bottom Bracket, I hope I haven't jumped the gun here, without knowing much about any of this. I plan on using the bike for just local rides and pleasure, so no need in a high end touring drive-train.

My question is this, the bolts that hold on the crankarms are rusted like you could imagine and I'm concerned I won't be able to remove them without ruining the 8mm hex, any ideas on how to go about this?
Also will I need a special tool to remove the bottom bracket?

Thanks!
 

Ajax Bay

Veteran
Location
East Devon
If the cranks "spin easily" why do you feel the need to change the bottom bracket.
The bolts may look rusty but hopefully the threads into the square taper spindle ends will break out OK. Get a higher quality hex key.
I've decided to replace the drive-train with a Sram NX Eagle Dub Groupset and a Sram Dub English Bottom Bracket, I hope I haven't jumped the gun here, without knowing much about any of this. . . I plan on using the bike for just local rides and pleasure, so no need in a high end touring drive-train.
The crankset alone of this groupset casts £100 odd in UK, so I assume you have stuff 'lying around'. Otherwise "local rides" so "[not] high end drive train" don't really square with a $300 SRAM NX Eagle groupset.
 
OP
OctoberKing

OctoberKing

New Member
Location
Louisiana
If the cranks "spin easily" why do you feel the need to change the bottom bracket.
The bolts may look rusty but hopefully the threads into the square taper spindle ends will break out OK. Get a higher quality hex key.

The crankset alone of this groupset casts £100 odd in UK, so I assume you have stuff 'lying around'. Otherwise "local rides" so "[not] high end drive train" don't really square with a $300 SRAM NX Eagle groupset.
I don't have anything "lying around" I found an old LHT that had been underwater for a week or so, then it was buried under ruined furniture and carpet and left for three years until it was given to me. Seemed reasonable to replace the bottom bracket after all it had been through and since I have to replace the entire drive-train I'm installing a new bottom bracket. Another thing, I don't know much at all about bicycles, and hadn't ever heard of Surly or their LHT until I got the bike home I discovered that the LHT was a well respected bike and seemed worthy of getting quality components, after shopping for components I settled the Sram NX Eagle Dub Groupset which I believe is their lowest price in their range.

After a long soak with penetrating oil I was able to remove the two crank arm bolts. Will I need a special tool to remove the crank arms from the square taper spindle?
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
I'd be worried about the state of the frame on the inside, being left for so long after being submerged.

It might be at the point of terminal corrosion, especially around the bottom bracket area where water could have been trapped for months or years.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
There is a special tool to remove the cranks from the square taper spindle but if you're replacing them with a new group set you can just drift the old ones off with a hammer and length of wood.
As @I like Skol says you need to check the state of the frame. The bb is likely to be terminal but you should have a replacement in the new group set. Is it square taper? I suspect not.
Another problem might be the seat post being corroded and stuck in the frame. Before you go any further check this out.
Good luck
 
OP
OctoberKing

OctoberKing

New Member
Location
Louisiana
Y'all are right about corrosion. Removing the seat post was a bear. Once it was removed I sprayed oil down the tube, removed all the fasteners that held the water bottle cages and sprayed oil in any opening I could find. I was able to remove the crank bolts but I'm waiting on a crank removal tool as well as a bottom bracket tool so no idea the condition of the frame until I dissemble. But no signs of corrosion on the exterior. The spindle is a square taper but the Sram replacement isn't. I'm out of my element here, so hoping for the best.

Thanks
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
You know what I would do? I'd strip the frame then pour ethanol or methanol or isopropanol into the tubes to wash out any water then leave the frame in the hot sun for a day to drive out the alcohol. Then I'd spray inside with a light oil like WD40.
 
OP
OctoberKing

OctoberKing

New Member
Location
Louisiana
You know what I would do? I'd strip the frame then pour ethanol or methanol or isopropanol into the tubes to wash out any water then leave the frame in the hot sun for a day to drive out the alcohol. Then I'd spray inside with a light oil like WD40.
Great advice, I'll do that once I get everything stripped from the frame. I have high hopes I've uncovered a gem, if not I'll have most of the components to build another bike.
 

Gravity Aided

Legendary Member
Location
Land of Lincoln
You've uncovered a gem, all right. A truly great touring bike. Whereabouts are you in Louisiana? There may be a bicycle co-op nearby, where you can get parts and such to fix this up, or maybe Craigslist could help. But this bike and frame are quite a good thing to find. Put a bit of effort into it, and it'll be far better than anything else coming down the pike. You might check and see that the steerer stem can be removed as well. Once you get past the seatpost and steerer stem, you know you can make the frame work for you. Provided it fits.
 
OP
OctoberKing

OctoberKing

New Member
Location
Louisiana
Hey a quick update and a question.

Finally had the opportunity pull the old bottom bracket after getting the proper tools and had a pleasant surprise, no damage to the frame, no rust inside the frame at the bottom tube. I've installed the new bottom bracket, cranks, rear derailleur and cassette. I'm now waiting to purchase a Derailleur Hanger Tool and a chain tool. I have a motorcycle chain tool but it's too large to use on the bicycle.

Unfortunately I discovered the front fork is bent pretty badly, one of the blades is slightly twisted and bent back. No doubt this happened when they threw an old sofa on top of the bike. The wheels for whatever reason were hanging from a nail in the barn so they seem to be without damage. I've looked online for forks and found a set for $100 usd. Question is how much would it change the ride of the bike by putting on a set of straight forks as opposed to curved ones that are on the bike? Best I can tell straight forks would shorten the wheelbase a cm or so. I'm leaning hard on just getting forks from Surly but I've found other 700c, 1 1/8" steering tube for for clincher brakes for half as much. Any suggestions?

Thanks!
 

CXRAndy

Guru
Location
Lincs
Depends whether you want to keep the bike authentic or just a run about. Shortening the wheelbase will make the handling more lively-by how much you wont know unless you have an original Surly with same tyres and setup
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
Question is how much would it change the ride of the bike by putting on a set of straight forks as opposed to curved ones that are on the bike? Best I can tell straight forks would shorten the wheelbase a cm or so.
Straight Vs curved forks will not necessarily affect the wheelbase, as straight forks can have more/less offset than curved forks depending on how much rake is built in at the crown. The main difference between running a straight bladed fork compared to a curved fork is that the straight fork might feel more harsh due to the lack of flex. A curved fork should induce an element of give in the blade that damps some of the road buzz. This doesn't mean a good curved fork will feel woolly or give less precise handling, but the curved fork is likely to be more comfortable if you are spending long days in the saddle on imperfect road surfaces.
 

Gravity Aided

Legendary Member
Location
Land of Lincoln
If you want to carry a front load, on racks in front, it may help to have some curve to the forks, or so they used to think, that longer fork trail was better for front end loading. This has been disputed in later years, and many people use short trail forks for touring now. It makes the bike more maneuverable, that's for sure, all things being equal. I have owned both the Raleigh Grand Prix(long trail fork) and Super Grand Prix(short trail fork). Other than alloy components and short trail forks, there is little difference between these bikes, beside the GP has 27" wheels and the SGP has has 700c. I find the SGP a bit more lively, but still capable as a tourer, although I don't do much front loading with it.
 
Top Bottom