Going shopping...new bike :-)

Maizie

Über Member
Location
NE Hertfordshire
I'm going shopping on Saturday. We're going to be in Cambridge as my husband has a specific purchase in mind. So I said last night, "as we'll be in Cambridge, can we go to the bike shop please?" and he said "of course, what are you after? A nice shiny new bike?"

And I just grinned at him.

Well, it's nearly two years since I started this commuting lark. Yes, the snow gave me a bit too much time off, but having got back on the bike I remember what I love about it. So, the 1998 Trek 800 rigid MTB (which was ignored entirely for 9 years, then given slicks to try this commuting lark) may have company soon.

My current commute is all on-road; I'm soon to have a new commute but that will be all on-road too (and a couple of miles longer). So sense tells me that I want a road bike.
I've never ridden drops though, so that's my only concern. But I am sure the bike shop will be able to help me out.

Am looking at something like the Trek 1.2 WSD (as road bike) or 7.5 FX WSD (for wussing out on the drop bars) - or, the equivalent models in any other brand (just Trek's been the easiest to navigate around and work out what's what online, so far!)

And I'm just getting over-excited and felt the need to share :biggrin:
 

Norm

Guest
Most excellent, Maizie.

I'd recommend finding somewhere that allows a good long test ride so you can try drops. Try to get at least an hour on the bike, that will give you a chance to get comfortable and, possibly, uncomfortable again.

I have two bikes with drop bars and I guess I only use the drops about 10% of the time. However, when I do want them, they make a big difference.

If you've already got a flat-barred bike, getting another one won't be adding much to your stable.

IMO, (and what I did was to) get a different bike, to use it for different occasions. Broaden the options with a roadie and keep the current rigid MTB.

Someone here said yesterday, I think, that we have more than one pair of shoes for office, walking, sports etc. If all you owned was a pair of Nike Trainers, you wouldn't go out and get a new pair of Reeboks, you'd be looking at something different. You'll find plenty of benefits in having more than one type of bike.

IMO.
 

threebikesmcginty

Corn Fed Hick...
Location
...on the slake
Ooo how exciting! :sad:

Go along with Norm here - a good range of different bikes is a useful thing to have, don't let anyone tell you anything else.

While you're there buying your new bike just keep an eye open for the next one - n+1 and all that. :biggrin:
 

battered

Über Member
Great stuff! It sounds like you've done it exactly right, started with what you had around, made it work or you, and now 2 years on you can use that knowledge to choose something good. I'd say you can now get something really nice but different from your MTB and enjoy it in summer. Come winter monsoons and salt you can always use the MTB again.

So all that remains is to have as many test rides as possible, get some miles done and buy the one that suits you best. Fab!
 

boylucifer

Well-Known Member
As you metioned the Trek 7.5fx, I'd say if you are not wanting drops this would be an excellent choice. I have just recently gotten one, and have been very impressed with it. Light, quick and decent looking (though I'm not so sure about the colour of the WSD model). Having looked (mainly on the net) at all the similar priced hybrids, it seemed (on the face of it) to be the best components for the cash. Mrs boylucifer got a 7.3fx wsd at the same time and is very happy with it, I think the frame and brakes are the same as the 7.5, with the biggest differences being in the forks, gears, saddle, and wheels.
If you decide you want drops - then you'll never be happy with the fx and would probably be much better served by getting the bike with drops in the first place.
 
OP
Maizie

Maizie

Über Member
Location
NE Hertfordshire
Thanks all - I'm looking forward to trying drops, my brother was astonished that I'd never ridden a bike with drops until I pointed out to him that he was always on a boy's racer and I was always on some girlie pink monstrosity!
I expect I will get on fine, given that drops have so many available options; and also when I'm really flying along I do tend to want to tuck down which is the more usual position for a road bike.

Doubtless the shop will have ideas as well, can't wait to try. Hope they are not too busy as it is a Saturday, if they are I will just have to take a day off work and go back and visit properly :sad:
 

naffets

Well-Known Member
Location
sheffield
+1 on the drops. even without using the drop position you have much more hand positions on the tops/hoods which makes for comfort if on longer rides plus even if your not confident on them the odd time when traffic free/clear road will only boost confidence
enjoy
 
I was so sure i did'nt want drops that i bought a flat bar Cannondale Synapse and then about a year later i bought a bargain priced Ridgeback Panorama touring bike (with drops) and now i rarely ride the Cannondale because the drops are so comfortable

Good luck in your choice and have fun choosing :biggrin:

Simon
 

Fiona N

Veteran
I bought my first drop-barred bike at Ben Haywards (also first bike with a derailleur, before that the hilly ride to school in West Yorkshire was strictly Sturmey Archer 3spd). It was a bit back in the day when I was a student :becool: I'd say that I can recommend them as I remember them being both friendly and helpful without being the least bit patronising but it was a long time ago - but still, if they're still going, they must be doing something right still :laugh:
 
OP
Maizie

Maizie

Über Member
Location
NE Hertfordshire
Yes, Ben Haywards is the most likely candiate. I know Cambridge has other bikes shops, and I have occasionally been in them, but BH as you say have always been helpful and not made me feel like a numpty (not even when I had my mother with me, telling the lady behind the counter "She cycles 10 miles to work you know. 10 miles there AND 10 mles back!" like it was roughly the equivalent of popping up to the top of Everest to pick up a pint of milk)
 

Geordie5

New Member
Location
Aberdeen
Be good to know how you get on at the weekend Maizie, in a similar position myself... 1.5yrs of commuting on MTB, now looking for a more speedier lighter option. At first glance I came to the 7.5 fx wsd as well due to its flat bar - the thought of drops is a scary one! :laugh:
 

Jezston

Über Member
Location
London
I bought a flat bar hybrid after riding an old mountain bike to work for a while - do regret not getting something with drops now as over long distances particularly having the option to change hand position is a must.

You could see if you can find a bike with interrupter brakes i.e. drop handlebars but with brakes on the flat part of the handlebars as well. Bear in mind even with drops you'll probably find yourself riding on the hoods most of the time rather than down on the drops themselves which won't be as different to riding on the flats.
 
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