Handlebars spin too loosely

S8961

Über Member
I thought it might be a loose headset but after watching some videos I realise that is not the cause as there is no movement when I rock the bike with the front brakes firmly on.

I would like a bit of resistance on turning the handlebars, no much but enough so that the front wheel stays pointing forward when the bike is on a kick stand. Here is a picture of the type of front fork connection. What can I adjust?
W9SnT22.jpg
 

biggs682

Smile a mile bike provider
Location
Northamptonshire
@S8961 are you saying you can turn the bars to the left or right but the wheels stay's still ?
 

mcshroom

Bionic Subsonic
The steering should move freely. My work stand came with an extending stick fitted with rubber straps so that you can secure the bars in position. You would be better looking at something like that, or just tying the bars in position with some string.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
+1 to the above. If the forks don't rock, the headset is tight enough.

To keep the wheel straight on the stand, toe strap the wheel or forks to the down tube. The strap will get mucky if the bike's not clean, though.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
The steering should move freely. My work stand came with an extending stick fitted with rubber straps so that you can secure the bars in position. You would be better looking at something like that, or just tying the bars in position with some string.
I think he wants the wheel straight when he has it supported on its kick stand not a workstand? Why specifically this is an issue I'm not sure
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
An over-tight steerer bearing will make the bike dive from one side of the road to the other in a very disconcerting manner as the steering won't be following the tiny changes in direction that you make unconsciously to keep the wheels immediately under your centre of gravity.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
I think he wants the wheel straight when he has it supported on its kick stand not a workstand? Why specifically this is an issue I'm not sure
Ah, the bike may be flipping if put on its stand while loaded. Loaded bikes should not be put on single prop stands because they're not designed to have that much weight sideways through the attachment point. Even on a centre stand, it's oft debated.

If it's flipping while unloaded, it probably means the prop stand is too short so not enough weight remains on the front wheel to keep it straight.
 

Cycleops

Guru
Location
Accra, Ghana
I guess we won't know until the OP comes back. The problem is likely to be worse on a 'sit up and beg' type bike like a dutch loop due for the slacker head angle. I see a lot of these bikes down here fitted with a damper.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
An over-tight steerer bearing will make the bike dive from one side of the road to the other in a very disconcerting manner as the steering won't be following the tiny changes in direction that you make unconsciously to keep the wheels immediately under your centre of gravity.
I agree. A dangerous thing to do.

Why not just carry a toe strap and loop the rim to the down tube when you park up? Two or more straps can be linked together if one is not long enough. It only takes seconds to put on and remove.
 
OP
S

S8961

Über Member
Thank you all for most helpful comments. I have just bought a steering damper, as a solution.

My kickstand rubbers are wearing. Has anyone a source for angled rubbers that can take the weight of a bike?
 
Top Bottom