Handlebars

eskimo

New Member
I have a Ridgeback flight 01 hybrid bike with flat handlebars. I am going on one of my first proper tours of Scotland soon and was wondering if these handlebars would be sore on my wrists over a few days/week of cycling. Are there alternatives to flat bars? Or is it unlikely to be a problem?

Apologies for my ignorance, fairly new to cycling...
 

ASC1951

Guru
Location
Yorkshire
It depends on your riding style. I like the variety of positions that you get with drops, but a lot of people prefer a more upright stance. You can get butterfly bars, which have the advantages (and disadvantages) of both, but your best bet is to go for some long - 75 mile+ - out-and-back days first to see how you get on.

It's a bit of a faff changing bars and if you have to fit different brakes it's an expensive faff.
 

threebikesmcginty

Corn Fed Hick...
Location
...on the slake
As ASC1951 says it's be a pain/expense to change bars without knowing if it's going to be of any benefit. As a cheap method of providing a change of hand position you could probably fit bar ends without having to alter too much else.

Edit: HLaB beat me to it!
 

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Also, there's no reason why you can't use a cheap pair of tr-bars either on a flat-bar bike to give your whole upper body a change of cycle postion. You don't need to be going a zillion mph to find benefit from them.
 
Location
Midlands
raindog said:
+1 to the last two posts - bar ends essential, especially for climbing.
I find the Cane Creek stlyle bar ends give me enough hand positions on straight bars and would not think of not having them as said above particulaly for climbing - they also allow the shoulders to be a little more open - helps with breathing - however I would go out on a day ride and find out
 
OP
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eskimo

New Member
Ok thanks for the replies guys. bar ends seem to be the way forward!
 

Rob3rt

Man or Moose!
Location
Manchester
Fab Foodie said:
Also, there's no reason why you can't use a cheap pair of tr-bars either on a flat-bar bike to give your whole upper body a change of cycle postion. You don't need to be going a zillion mph to find benefit from them.
Yup, I agree with this suggestion, something like the Profile Century bars, they are made more for touring than aero, will allow you to stretch out and get a different possition, excellent for long straight roads, will let you get some extra speed as a by product. Aero bars are very comfy when set up in a relaxed angle.
 
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