have i got the right bike

Cycle power

New Member
Hi all.
I have just bought my Wife and i a new bike. They are Dawes heritage collection for me a Consulate other half a Duchess.
I bought them because i commute to work and my Wife wanted to take up cycling. The thing is she has really taken up cycling and we often go on 30 mile trips on our days off My point is i have only been use to road commuting but these bike rides we have been going on often takes you on bridal ways or canal paths which although not exactly off roading but can be a bit bumpy.
I have e-mailed Dawes to see if our bikes can withstand this sort of terrain but have had no reply so i was wandering if any readers to this forum have a Dawes heritage bike and used it on bridal ways etc and if they have noticed any ill effects.

Thanks all
 

shrew

New Member
Location
St Neots , Cambs
I cant see any reason why not, most bikes can handle a bit of rough ground and doesnt sound like your doing anything harsh, just avoid harsh jolts, like tree roots where you can. keep an eye out on bits working loose (such as spokes) and look after them, should be fine.

I popped a suspension fork on my hybrid commuter bike and took it on the duel slalom and 4X down hill courses at Chicksands bike park and it was fine and dandy, Although, i wouldnt recommend it.

http://www.chicksandsbikepark.co.uk/trail_guide/dual_slalom/
 
OP
C

Cycle power

New Member
I cant see any reason why not, most bikes can handle a bit of rough ground and doesnt sound like your doing anything harsh, just avoid harsh jolts, like tree roots where you can. keep an eye out on bits working loose (such as spokes) and look after them, should be fine.
Thanks Shrew. We do try and avoid such things. But you know how it is your going over a bit of rough ground then all of a sudden you hit a bit of a big divit.
Just wanted some reassurance i suppose as we do want to look after them as they are really nice bikes.
Regards.
 
OP
C

Cycle power

New Member
LOL i know exactly what a windy miller type bike your Wife refers to.
The reason for my question is now that i have bought the two bikes at £250 each which was quite a lot for my budget I'm now looking to keep them for quite a few years looking after them, regular servicing etc. I just did not think we would have to ride down old tracks disused railway lines etc. Don't get me wrong we both love it. I have been going to work on my bike for over 20 years now so i have just used them for work and not leisure.Now Im using it for both.I just hope it will not damage the bikes with the occasional rough terrain. And i a years time I'm off back to the bike shop for two more.

Regards
 

Alan Whicker

Senior Member
I can't imagine a bit of gentle 'off road' would do serious damage your bikes, though you might get buckled wheels if you overdo it. As a London rider I'm always encountering bumps and potholes worse than a lot of things I've encountered on towpaths and even bridleways, and my bikes have always coped. The Rough Stuff Fellowship were taking 'ordinary' bikes seriously off road back in the 50s.
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
To re-itterate Alan. Before MTBs. Even before BMX, this was the type of bike a young rogue would strip down and install 'cow-horns' for 'tracking' round the woods and riding down hillside paths.

All I can say in caution if you're going over rough stuff is.... keep checking the rims for true running, and learn to use a spoke key.
 

swee'pea99

Legendary Member
As long as you're comfortable using 'em, you're fine. The bikes certainly won't suffer - though as others have said, look out for nuts & screws working loose. Decent bikes can take a hellluva lot of abuse - and Dawes are decent bikes. 
 

g00se

Veteran
Location
Norwich
I reckon you have made a decent choice for what you want. At that budget, any bike with suspension is not going to be great. With the sit-up-and-beg position, I'd be less worried about the ride being too rough on your arms as on your backside. If it's a bit too uncomfortable, you can get a cheap seat-post with suspension for a few quid that will smooth things out.

As the others have said, keep an eye on the tightness of the nuts/quick-release-skewers holding the wheels onto the forks and rear drop-outs. Almost came a cropper from not doing this myself after going over a load of cobbles.

What could suffer is the wheel rims - if they ever do fail at any point, get some decent ones to take the knocks. Also, regularly check the tension of the spokes - make sure they are all taught. If any are loose, the wheel will fail very quickly.
 

taxing

Well-Known Member
Lovely bikes!
 

raymondox

New Member
Hi all.
I have just bought my Wife and i a new bike. They are Dawes heritage collection for me a Consulate other half a Duchess.
I bought them because i commute to work and my Wife wanted to take up cycling. The thing is she has really taken up cycling and we often go on 30 mile trips on our days off My point is i have only been use to road commuting but these bike rides we have been going on often takes you on bridal ways or canal paths which although not exactly off roading but can be a bit bumpy.
I have e-mailed Dawes to see if our bikes can withstand this sort of terrain but have had no reply so i was wandering if any readers to this forum have a Dawes heritage bike and used it on bridal ways etc and if they have noticed any ill effects.

Thanks all
The clue is in the tyres. 35c tyres indicate hybrid capability. Canal paths and bridal ways should be no problem, but I'd keep clear of bridalways after a storm, hoof prints will bring anyone off. It shouldn't hurt your bike though.
 
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