I hit a dog yesterday

longers

Veteran
Hairy Jock said:
Try using the command SIT, if it told to sit and does so in good time there should no problem in passing it. If your dog won't sit on command then keep it on a lead. Simple.
Funnily enough that's exactly what I do.
She sits and waits but is thinking about knocking them off.
 

HJ

Cycling in Scotland
Location
Auld Reekie
Noodley said:
Jesus H Christ - this thread has become the Barbara Woodhouse school of cycling etiquette for dogs!
Somebodies got to do it...
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
They are pretty robust animals - seen a few hit by cars and they bounced off and carried on - just lucky you weren't a car then - the owner was lucky you weren't hurt.

Two incidents spring to mind with dogs - One... a large group of us were climbing Long Hill into Buxton, we were on the lower slopes coming out of Whaley Bridge, when a Jack Russel thing ran out at about 15 of us - bikes everywhere - was quite funny really as we all tried to either avoid the dog or getting bitten. Thank goodness there were no cars about, we were all over the place.

The other was climbing Birtles Hill near Monks Heath in Cheshire, a group of us neared the top when a large dog started chasing us along it's property, but we knew it was open at the end...... it was a case of fight or flight - one mate turned round, but I was too far so I pedaled...... I have never ever done 30 mph in a 42 x 19 before (or there abouts) and hope never have to do that again..... I still look out for the blasted thing even now (although though it's probably dead by now)...

Oh what fun ? ;)
 

Arch

Married to Night Train
Location
Salford, UK
When I was about 12 I rode into (it ran out in front of me from a garden) a Rhodesian Ridgeback. Result: me and bike tangled up on floor, dog looking down at us with daft expression, blinking a bit... Like hitting a brick wall!

That was the owner's fault, the mother of the family couldn't control it, and it just ran out to play with the kids outside in the street. It was one of those big dogs owned by a short stout little man, possibly with adequacy issues.
 

wafflycat

New Member
Legally, a dog owner *is* responsible for damage caused by his/her dog (England & Wales, dunno about Scotland). Example - if a dog runs out into the road and you happen to be driving and said dog hits car - the dog owner is liable for any damage to the car. It's why it's a reportable incident. So if you happen to be cycling along the road/cycle path and a dog runs out into your path and you haven't managed to avoid it - the dog owner is legally liable for any damage sustained to you and your bike.

Yesterday I almost had a run-in with a dog. I was cycling along a road and in the middle of it was a woman *barely holding on to* a huge alsatian. The dog was barking and growling at anything and everything. The dog lunged for me and the woman just about managed to hold on to the dog and stop it getting me. I'd have had no qualms about involving the police if I had been bitten. Thing was, just around the corner, at a ford, were some kids playing with a couple of young labradors. Entirely differently behaved dogs. So I had a word with the kids & the adults with them, to tell them about the less than well-controlled alsatian just round the corner. The adults appreciated the heads-up.
 

alecstilleyedye

nothing in moderation
Moderator
fossyant said:
They are pretty robust animals - seen a few hit by cars and they bounced off and carried on - just lucky you weren't a car then - the owner was lucky you weren't hurt.

Two incidents spring to mind with dogs - One... a large group of us were climbing Long Hill into Buxton, we were on the lower slopes coming out of Whaley Bridge, when a Jack Russel thing ran out at about 15 of us - bikes everywhere - was quite funny really as we all tried to either avoid the dog or getting bitten. Thank goodness there were no cars about, we were all over the place.

The other was climbing Birtles Hill near Monks Heath in Cheshire, a group of us neared the top when a large dog started chasing us along it's property, but we knew it was open at the end...... it was a case of fight or flight - one mate turned round, but I was too far so I pedaled...... I have never ever done 30 mph in a 42 x 19 before (or there abouts) and hope never have to do that again..... I still look out for the blasted thing even now (although though it's probably dead by now)...

Oh what fun ? ;)
i've never climbed birtles hill at that speed either :biggrin::ohmy::ohmy:
 

ledley

New Member
wafflycat said:
Legally, a dog owner *is* responsible for damage caused by his/her dog (England & Wales, dunno about Scotland).
Thats really good to know as i've had a few very close shaves recently & had run ins with dog owners after their dog has chased my bike when i've been riding.

I've always stood my ground if it was down to their lack of control over their dog & its good to know i'm right to do so.

Dont know if anyone on here rides around Victoria park in east London where most of my dog incidents have occured but the squirrels there have a death wish too.
 

HJ

Cycling in Scotland
Location
Auld Reekie
ledley said:
Dont know if anyone on here rides around Victoria park in east London where most of my dog incidents have occured but the squirrels there have a death wish too.
You mean like this http://www.flickr.com/photos/bike/29172942/ and this http://www.flickr.com/photos/bike/76039319/?
 

ledley

New Member
Woah yeah exactly like that. They have an urge to dart through your wheel for some reason.

Had it happen a few times now & the best thing to do is to steer towards them so they run the other way from you.
 

Big Bren

New Member
Location
Yorkshire
I hit a dog last night too, right in the mush with the end of my trainer, quite on purpose.

I was out for a run and the owner was 'walking' the dog on one of those leads that extends to about 8 miles; stand on the doorstep, unleash the lead and your dog gets a walk with no effort or exertion required by the owner - super! Not so super though, is that as the lead gets longer, you relinquish more and more control of your dangerous animal.

Anywho, the dog went for my ankle as I ran past so I hoofed it in the gob to disabuse it of any notions of biting me. Owner and dog were both suitably miffed, as would I have been had it managed to sink its gnashers into my sweet man-flesh. Similarly, had I been a small child who, by virtue of being a short-arse, presented my face as a viable target, things could have been much nastier.

Conclusion - I am a cruel bastage, but my ankles are intact. I can live with that.

Bren
 

asterix

Comrade Member
Location
Limoges or York
It ain't the dogs, it's their owners..

My avatar is a dog I met in the Pyrennees near a mountain top. Apparently they use them to look after flocks of sheep which they can do without supervison. When I encountered it, it was ensuring that the last sheep of the flock crossed the road with the rest of the bunch.

It was far too clever to chase cyclists!
 

asterix

Comrade Member
Location
Limoges or York
Big Bren;34905][quote name= said:
It ain't the dogs, it's their owners..
Nope, it was definitely a dog.

Having said that, had the vest-sporting owner had a go at my ankles, he'd have got a kick in the mush aswell.

Bren[/QUOTE]

Nothing to do with choice of lead after all, then?
 
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