I went to a talk.

longers

Veteran
Last night on dry stonewalling. A great 2 hours that I didn't want to end. The bloke was fascinating and got me really enthused. I've always appreciated the skill and art of it, I grew up admiring the great lengths of stones which climb improbable gradients in Cumbria (quite a few built by Italian POWs).

I've got loads of inspiration for new rides to places mentioned in the talk and recognised nearly all the local slides from having cycled past. Twas a good night :blush:.


Next time out on the bike in daylight I'll probably ride into a stationary object while admiring a fine cheekend or a lovely smoot. :tongue:
 
I've often caught myself perving on a "fine cheekend or a lovely smoot"
 

Pete

Guest
I have great respect for dry stone walls, they are an important part of the landscape and perform an essential function in some parts of the country, and if you do need to climb over one take great care (I remember once spending half an hour frantically re-building after my clumsy efforts demolished part of one :tongue: ).

However I must admit that, many years ago, one such wall was nearly my nemesis - had I hit it hard I would certainly have become an ex-Pete and you would not have had me to trouble you on this forum :blush: . Admittedly I was descending Holme Moss at great speed - after dark - without adequate lights! :biggrin::sad:. I escaped with a few scratches.
 

rich p

ridiculous old lush
Location
Brighton
My mate bought a cottage in the peak park a few years ago and after some advice we built a section of wall round his garden of about 6 metres - it was great fun and not a bad job. He got a pro in to do a tricky section with gates and lots of corners and he was a delight to watch. He was alot quicker than 1 metre a day though. He also, unlike us, had no compunction about chopping bits off the stones to make them fit better.
 

rich p

ridiculous old lush
Location
Brighton
My mate bought a cottage in the peak park a few years ago and after some advice we built a section of wall round his garden of about 6 metres - it was great fun and not a bad job. He got a pro in to do a tricky section with gates and lots of corners and he was a delight to watch. He was alot quicker than 1 metre a day though. He also, unlike us, had no compunction about chopping bits off the stones to make them fit better.
 

Fnaar

Smutmaster General
Location
Thumberland
Kirstie said:
Apparently it takes 1 person 1 day to do 1 metre of it.
I did this in a maths lesson at school...it takes half a person half a day to build half a wall, or something....:blush:
I thought about doing a course in walling.... nuff respec' to the builders and maintainers!
 

Fnaar

Smutmaster General
Location
Thumberland
Kirstie said:
Apparently it takes 1 person 1 day to do 1 metre of it.
I did this in a maths lesson at school...it takes half a person half a day to build half a wall, or something....;)
I thought about doing a course in walling.... nuff respec' to the builders and maintainers!
 

BigAndyH

Über Member
Location
Bournemouth
When I lived in Sheffield a mate of a mate managed to get on a "YTS" course or its equivalent in dry stone walling the year after graduation. The main attraction seemed to be that it allowed him to maintain his student lifetsyle - they would not start work outdoors until it "warmed up" and had to finish before dark, which meant about 5 hour working days in Winter. If there was a hard frost or snow they didn't go out at all - just turn up in the morning to register, then go home, which in Sheffield in the 80s meant 6 weeks off over the Winter. Lost touch with the guy now, but don't think he had any intention of pursuing it as an occupation - after all he had a degree in Chemical Engineering.
 

BigAndyH

Über Member
Location
Bournemouth
When I lived in Sheffield a mate of a mate managed to get on a "YTS" course or its equivalent in dry stone walling the year after graduation. The main attraction seemed to be that it allowed him to maintain his student lifetsyle - they would not start work outdoors until it "warmed up" and had to finish before dark, which meant about 5 hour working days in Winter. If there was a hard frost or snow they didn't go out at all - just turn up in the morning to register, then go home, which in Sheffield in the 80s meant 6 weeks off over the Winter. Lost touch with the guy now, but don't think he had any intention of pursuing it as an occupation - after all he had a degree in Chemical Engineering.
 

Cab

New Member
Location
Cambridge
You should be able to do some volountary walling if you contact the BTCV. Well worth it, its a fascinating and most rewarding thing to do.
 

Cab

New Member
Location
Cambridge
You should be able to do some volountary walling if you contact the BTCV. Well worth it, its a fascinating and most rewarding thing to do.
 
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